Radiolab podcast

Radiolab

Radiolab is on a curiosity bender. We ask deep questions and use investigative journalism to get the answers. A given episode might whirl you through science, legal history, and into the home of someone halfway across the world. The show is known for innovative sound design, smashing information into music. It is hosted by Lulu Miller and Latif Nasser.

Radiolab is on a curiosity bender. We ask deep questions and use investigative journalism to get the answers. A given episode might whirl you through science, legal history, and into the home of someone halfway across the world. The show is known for innovative sound design, smashing information into music. It is hosted by Lulu Miller and Latif Nasser.

 

#150

How to Save a Life

We get it… the world feels too bleak and too big for you to make a difference. But there is one thing - one simple tangible thing - you can do to make all the difference in the world to someone, possibly even a loved one, at arguably the worst moment of their life. Statistics show that 1 out of every 5 people on earth will die of heart failure. Cardiac arrests can happen anywhere, anytime - in your bed, on the street, on your honeymoon. And every minute that passes after your heart stops beating, your chances of surviving drop dramatically. For all the strides modern medicine has made in treating heart conditions, the ambulance still doesn’t always make it in time. The only person who can keep you alive during those crucial first few minutes is a stranger, a neighbor, your partner, anyone nearby willing to perform CPR. Yet most of us don’t do anything. Join Radiolab host Latif Nasser, ER doctor and Radiolab contributor Avir Mitra, and TikTok stars Dr. and Lady Glaucomflecken, as we discover the fascinating science of cardiac arrest, hear a true and harrowing story of a near-death experience, and hunt down the best place to die (hint… it’s not a hospital). Plus, with the help of the American Red Cross and the Bee Gees, you, yes you, will learn how to do hands-only CPR! Special thanks to Will and Kristin Flannery of course..Check out the Glaucomflekens own podcast “Knock Knock, Hi!” (LINK), the Greene Space here at WNYC’s home in NYC… first of all Jennifer Sendrow, who really made it happened and helped us make it work at basically every stage of the process .. and the rest of the Greene Space crew: Carlos Cruz Figueroa, Chase Culpon, Ricardo Fernández, Jessica Lowery, Skye Pallo Ross, Eric Weber, Ryan Andrew Wilde, and Andrew Yanchyshyn. Also, thank you to the Red Cross for helping us make this happen and providing the CPR dummies, and all the people we had there doing the training: Ashley London, Jeanette Nicosia, Charlene Yung, Jacob Stebel, Tye Morales, Anna Stacy.  Aditya Shekhar. We have some exciting news! In the “ [Zoozve] (https://radiolab.org/podcast/zoozve) ” episode, Radiolab named its first-ever quasi-moon, and now it's your turn! Radiolab has teamed up with The International Astronomical Union to launch a global naming contest for one of Earth’s quasi-moons. This is your chance to make your mark on the heavens. Submit your name ideas now through September, or vote on your favorites starting in November: [https://radiolab.org/moon] (https://radiolab.org/moon) EPISODE CREDITS: Reported by - Avir Mitrawith mixing help from - Jeremy BloomAnd Fact-checking by - Natalie Middleton CITATIONS: Please put any supporting materials you think our audience would find interesting or useful below in the appropriate broad categories. Videos:Check out the whole show in its full glory at the website for WNYC’s Greene Space: [https://www.thegreenespace.org/] (https://www.thegreenespace.org/) Will Flannery’s Youtube channel, Dr. Glaucomflecken: [https://www.youtube.com/@DGlaucomflecken] (https://www.youtube.com/@DGlaucomflecken) Music:The [perfect playlist for a CPR Emergency] (https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6pg2iW0GU9UROprqk9Nawi?si=be45b3d0808a4260) Classes:If you’d like to sign up to learn CPR, and get certified, the Red Cross provides classes all across the country and online, just go to [https://www.redcross.org/take-a-class] (https://www.redcross.org/take-a-class) , to learn more Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

12 Jul 2024

47 MINS

47:52

12 Jul 2024


#149

Happy Birthday, Good Dr. Sacks

First aired back in 2013, we originally released this episode to celebrate the 80th birthday of one of our favorite human beings, Oliver Sacks. To celebrate, his good friend, and our former co-host Rober Krulwich, asks the good doctor to look back, and explain how thousands of worms and a motorbike accident led to a brilliant writing career. We have some exciting news! In the “ [Zoozve] (https://radiolab.org/podcast/zoozve) ” episode, Radiolab named its first-ever quasi-moon, and now it's your turn! Radiolab has teamed up with The International Astronomical Union to launch a global naming contest for one of Earth’s quasi-moons. This is your chance to make your mark on the heavens. Submit your name ideas now through September, or vote on your favorites starting in November: [https://radiolab.org/moon.] (https://radiolab.org/moon) Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

05 Jul 2024

23 MINS

23:58

05 Jul 2024


#148

The Alford Plea

In 1995, a tragic fire in Pittsburgh set off a decades-long investigation that sent Greg Brown Jr. to prison. But, after a series of remarkable twists, Brown found himself contemplating a path to freedom that involved a paradoxical plea deal—one that peels back the curtain on the criminal justice system and reveals it doesn’t work the way we think it does.  Special thanks to John Lentini, Amanda Gillooly, Fred Buckner, Debbie Steinmeyer, Marissa Bluestine, Jason Hazlewood, Meredith Kennedy, Kristen Vermilya, Joshua Ceballos and Lauren Cooperman.We have some exciting news! In the “ [Zoozve] (https://radiolab.org/podcast/zoozve) ” episode, Radiolab named its first-ever quasi-moon, and now it's your turn! Radiolab has teamed up with The International Astronomical Union to launch a global naming contest for one of Earth’s quasi-moons. This is your chance to make your mark on the heavens. Submit your name ideas now through September, or vote on your favorites starting in November: [https://radiolab.org/moon] (https://radiolab.org/moon) EPISODE CREDITS: Reported by - Peter Smith and Matt Kielty Produced by - Matt Kielty Original music and sound design contributed by - contributed by Matt Kieltywith mixing help from - Arianne WackFact-checking by - Emily Kriegerand Edited by  - Becca BresslerEPISODE CITATIONS:Magazine Articles -More work by [Peter Andrey Smith] (https://undark.org/undark-author/peter-andrey-smith/) ( [https://zpr.io/wXfYn5GMM7dN] (https://zpr.io/wXfYn5GMM7dN) ) for Undark Magazine  [The Sniff Test] (https://www.science.org/content/article/should-dog-s-sniff-be-enough-convict-person-murder) ( [https://zpr.io/xkDzHsrrpFeR] (https://zpr.io/xkDzHsrrpFeR) ) for Science by Peter Andrey Smith Books - ["Why the Innocent Plead Guilty and the Guilty Go Free"] (https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374289997/whytheinnocentpleadguiltyandtheguiltygofree) ( [https://zpr.io/wF8KtSFKTmwi] (https://zpr.io/wF8KtSFKTmwi) ), by Judge Jed S Rakoff [“Smoke but No Fire”] (https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520385801/smoke-but-no-fire) ( [https://zpr.io/C3NceBFmhJk4] (https://zpr.io/C3NceBFmhJk4) ) by Jessica S. Henry [“Punishment Without Trial”] (https://clcjbooks.rutgers.edu/books/punishment-without-trial-why-plea-bargaining-is-a-bad-deal/) ( [https://zpr.io/AbqT5u5eqSy5] (https://zpr.io/AbqT5u5eqSy5) ) by Carissa Byrne Hessick  ** The transcript of Greg Brown Jr.’s plea from 2022 has yet to be made public.  Signup for the Radiolab Newsletter!! It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [X] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) (formerly Twitter) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

28 Jun 2024

53 MINS

53:49

28 Jun 2024


#147

Birdie in the Cage

People have been doing the square dance since before the Declaration of Independence. But does that mean it should be THE American folk dance? That question took us on a journey from Appalachian front porches, to dance classes across our nation, to the halls of Congress, and finally a Kansas City convention center. And along the way, we uncovered a secret history of square dancing that made us see how much of our national identity we could stuff into that square, and what it means for a dance to be of the people, by the people, and for the people. Special thanks to Jim Mayo, Claude Fowler, Paul Gifford, Jim Maczko, Jim Davis, Paul Moore, Jack Pladdys, Mary Jane Wegener, Kinsey Brooke and Connie Keener.We have some exciting news! In this “Zoozve” episode, Radiolab named its first-ever quasi-moon, and now it's your turn! Radiolab has teamed up with The International Astronomical Union to launch a global naming contest for one of Earth’s quasi-moons. This is your chance to make your mark on the heavens. Submit your name ideas now through September, or vote on your favorites starting in November: [https://radiolab.org/moon] (https://radiolab.org/moon) Subscribe to our newsletter!! It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

21 Jun 2024

44 MINS

44:18

21 Jun 2024


#146

Aphantasia

Close your eyes and imagine a red apple. What do you see? Turns out there’s a whole spectrum of answers to that question and Producer Sindhu Gnanasambandan is on one far end. In this episode, she explores what it means to see – and not see – in your mind. Special thanks to Kim Nederveen Pieterse, Nathan Peereboom, Lizzie Peabody, Kristin Lin, Jo Eidman, Mark Nakhla, Andrew Leland, Brian Radcliffe, Adam Zeman, John Green, Craig Venter, Dustin Grinnell, and Soraya Shockley.We have some exciting news! In this “Zoozve” episode, Radiolab named its first-ever quasi-moon, and now it's your turn! Radiolab has teamed up with The International Astronomical Union to launch a global naming contest for one of Earth’s quasi-moons. This is your chance to make your mark on the heavens. Submit your name ideas now through September, or vote on your favorites starting in November: [https://radiolab.org/moon] (https://radiolab.org/moon) EPISODE CREDITS:  Reported by - Sindhu GnanasambandanProduced by - Sindhu Gnanasambandanwith help from - Annie McEwenOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Dylan Keefewith mixing help from - Jeremy Bloom and Arianne WackFact-checking by - Natalie Middletonand Edited by - Pat Walters Sign up for our newsletter!! It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

14 Jun 2024

34 MINS

34:43

14 Jun 2024


#145

Argentine Invasion

From a suburban sidewalk in southern California, Jad and Robert witness the carnage of a gruesome turf war. Though the tiny warriors doing battle clock in at just a fraction of an inch, they have evolved a surprising, successful, and rather unsettling strategy of ironclad loyalty, absolute intolerance, and brutal violence. David Holway, an ecologist and evolutionary biologist from UC San Diego, takes us to a driveway in Escondido, California where a grisly battle rages. In this quiet suburban spot, two groups of ants are putting on a chilling display of dismemberment and death. According to David, this battle line marks the edge of an enormous super-colony of Argentine ants. Think of that anthill in your backyard, and stretch it out across five continents. Argentine ants are not good neighbors. When they meet ants from another colony, any other colony, they fight to the death, and tear the other ants to pieces. While other kinds of ants sometimes take slaves or even have sex with ants from different colonies, the Argentine ants don’t fool around. If you’re not part of the colony, you’re dead. According to evolutionary biologist Neil Tsutsui and ecologist Mark Moffett, the flood plains of northern Argentina offer a clue as to how these ants came to dominate the planet. Because of the frequent flooding, the homeland of Linepithema humile is basically a bootcamp for badass ants. One day, a couple ants from one of these families of Argentine ants made their way onto a boat and landed in New Orleans in the late 1800s. Over the last century, these Argentine ants wreaked havoc across the southern U.S. and a significant chunk of coastal California. In fact, Melissa Thomas, an Australian entomologist, reveals that these Argentine ants are even more well-heeled than we expected - they've made to every continent except Antarctica. No matter how many thousands of miles separate individual ants, when researchers place two of them together - whether they're plucked from Australia, Japan, Hawaii ... even Easter Island - they recognize each other as belonging to the same super-colony. But the really mind-blowing thing about these little guys is the surprising success of their us-versus-them death-dealing. Jad and Robert wrestle with what to make of this ant regime, whether it will last, and what, if anything, it might mean for other warlike organisms with global ambitions.We have some exciting news! In this “Zoozve” episode, Radiolab named its first-ever quasi-moon, and now it's your turn! Radiolab has teamed up with The International Astronomical Union to launch a global naming contest for one of Earth’s quasi-moons. This is your chance to make your mark on the heavens. Submit your name ideas now through September, or vote on your favorites starting in November: [https://radiolab.org/moon] (https://radiolab.org/moon) Sign up for our newsletter. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on  [Instagram, ] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) , and, [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab)  @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org.] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

31 May 2024

21 MINS

21:54

31 May 2024


#144

Mixtapes to the Moon

They promised to change you. They ended up changing all of us.   On July 20, 1969 humanity watched as Neil Armstrong stepped foot on the moon. It was the dazzling culmination of a decade of teamwork, a collective global experience unlike anything before or since, a singular moment in which every human being was invited to feel part of something larger than themself. There was however, one man who was left out.    This week on Radiolab we explore what it means to be together and - of course - the cassette tapes that changed it.  Special thanks to WBUR and the team at City Space for having us and recording this event, all the other folks and venues that hosted us on tour, Sarah Rose Leonard and Lance Gardner at KQED for developing this show with us and Alex Overington for musically bringing it to life.  EPISODE CREDITS:Reported by - Simon AdlerProduced by - Simon AdlerOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Alex OveringtonFact-checking by - Emily Kriegerand Edited by  - Soren Wheeler EPISODE CITATIONS: Videos -  Check out Zack Taylor’s beautiful documentary [CASSETTE: A Documentary Mixtape] (https://vimeo.com/127216590) (https://vimeo.com/127216590)Mall videos referenced in the episode - https://youtu.be/bPrZOk1DgGY?si=l8dE8_GUxHznuqHL Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , X ( [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) ) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) .Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

24 May 2024

37 MINS

37:38

24 May 2024


#143

Lucy

Chimps. Bonobos. Humans. We're all great apes, but that doesn’t mean we’re one happy family.This episode, a mashup of content stretching all the way back to 2010, asks the question, is cross-species co-habitation an utterly stupid idea? Or might it be our one last hope as more and more humans fill up the planet? A chimp named Lucy teaches us the ups and downs of growing up human, and a visit to The Great Ape Trust in Des Moines, Iowa highlights some of the basics of bonobo culture (be careful, they bite). EPISODE CITATIONS - Photos: [Photo of Lucy and Janis hugging.] (https://www.irishmirror.ie/tv/channel-4s-lucy-human-chimp-23922107)   ( [https://zpr.io/U7qRdYDqxbGj] (https://zpr.io/U7qRdYDqxbGj) ) Videos: [Lucy throughout the years (https://vimeo.com/9377513] (https://vimeo.com/9377513) )Slideshow produced by Sharon Shattuck. Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

17 May 2024

57 MINS

57:24

17 May 2024


#142

Selected Shorts

A selection of short flights of fact and fancy performed live on stage.Usually we tell true stories at this show, but earlier this spring we were invited to guest host a live show called Selected Shorts, a New York City institution that presents short fiction performed on stage by great actors (you’ll often find Tony, Emmy and Oscars winners on their stage). We treated the evening a bit like a Radiolab episode, selecting a theme, and choosing several stories related to that theme. The stories we picked were all about “flight” in one way or another, and came from great writers like Brian Doyle, Miranda July, Don Shea and Margaret Atwood. As we traveled from the flight of a hummingbird, to an airplane seat beside a celebrity, to the mind of a bat, we found these stories pushing us past the edge of what we thought we could know, in the way that all truly great writing does. Special thanks to Abubakr Ali, Becca Blackwell, Molly Bernard, Zach Grenier, Drew Richardson, Jennifer Brennan and the whole team at Selected Shorts and Symphony Space. EPISODE CREDITS:  Produced by - Maria Paz GutierrezFact-checking by - Natalie Middletonand Edited by  - Pat Walters Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

10 May 2024

48 MINS

48:26

10 May 2024


#141

Memory and Forgetting

Remembering is a tricky, unstable business. This hour: a look behind the curtain of how memories are made...and forgotten.     The act of recalling in our minds something that happened in the past is an unstable and profoundly unreliable process--it’s easy come, easy go as we learn how true memories can be obliterated, and false ones added. Then, Oliver Sacks joins us to tell the story of an amnesiac whose love for his wife and music transcend his 7-second memory. Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

26 Apr 2024

57 MINS

57:38

26 Apr 2024


#140

Small Potatoes

An ode to the small, the banal, the overlooked things that make up the fabric of our lives.Most of our stories are about the big stuff: Important or dramatic events, big ideas that transform the world around us or inspire conflict and struggle and change. But most of our lives, day by day or hour by hour, are made up of … not that stuff. Most of our lives are what we sometimes dismissively call “small potatoes.” This week on Radiolab, Heather Radke challenges to focus on the small, the overlook, the everyday … and find out what happens when you take a good hard look at the things we all usually overlook. Special thanks to Moeko Fujii, Kelley Conway, Robin Kelley, Jason Isaacs, and Andrew Semans EPISODE CREDITS:  Reported by - Heather Radke, Rachael Cusick, and Matt Kieltywith help from - Erica HeilmanProduced by - Annie McEwen and Matt KieltyOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Annie McEwen, Matt Kielty, and Jeremy BloomFact-checking by - Emily Krieger and Diane Kellyand Edited by  - Alex Neason EPISODE CITATIONS: Audio -Check out Ian Chillag’s podcast, [ Everything is Alive] (https://www.everythingisalive.com) , from Radiotopia. Museums -Learn more about The Museum of Everyday Life, located in Glover, Vermont, [here] (https://museumofeverydaylife.org) . Newsletter - Heather Radke has a newsletter all about small potatoes. It’s called Petite Patate and you can subscribe at [HeatherRadke.substack.com] (http://heatherradke.substack.com) . Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

19 Apr 2024

59 MINS

59:09

19 Apr 2024


#139

The Distance of the Moon

In an episode we last featured on our [Radiolab for Kids Feed] (https://radiolab.org/radiolab-kids) back in 2020, and in honor of its blocking out the Sun for a bit of us for a bit last week, in this episode, we’re gonna talk more about the moon. According to one theory, (psst listen to [The Moon Itself] (https://radiolab.org/podcast/the-moon-itself) if you want to know more) the moon formed when a Mars-sized chunk of rock collided with Earth, the moon coalesced out of the debris from that impact. And it was MUCH closer to Earth than it is today. This idea is taken to its fanciful limit in Italo Calvino's story "The Distance of the Moon" (from his collection Cosmicomics, translated by William Weaver). Read by Liev Schreiber, the story is narrated by a character with the impossible-to-pronounce name Qfwfq, and tells of a strange crew who jump between Earth and moon, and sometimes hover in the nether reaches of gravity between the two. This reading was part of a live event hosted by Radiolab and Selected Shorts, and it originally aired on WNYC’s and [PRI’s SELECTED SHORTS] (https://www.symphonyspace.org/selected-shorts) , hosted by BD Wong and paired with a Ray Bradbury classic, “All Summer in a Day,” read by musical theater star Michael Cerveris. Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

12 Apr 2024

40 MINS

40:47

12 Apr 2024


#138

The Moon Itself

There’s a total solar eclipse coming. On Monday, April 8, for a large swath of North America, the sun will disappear, in the middle of the day. Everywhere you look, people are talking about it. What will it feel like when the sun goes away? What will the blocked-out sun look like? But all this talk of the sun got us thinking: wait, what about the moon? The only reason this whole solar eclipse thing is happening is because the moon is stepping in front of the sun. So in today’s episode, we stop treating the moon like a bit player in this epic cosmic event, and place it centerstage. We get to know the moon, itself — from birth, to middle age, to … death. This episode was reported by Molly Webster, Pat Walters, Becca Bressler, Alan Goffinski, Maria Paz Guttierez, Sarah Qari, Simon Adler and Alex Neason, and produced by Matt Kielty, Becca Bressler, Pat Walters, Maria Paz Guttierrez, Alan Goffinski and Simon Adler.  It was edited by Becca Bressler and Pat Walters. Fact-checked by Diane Kelly and Natalie A Middleton. Original Music and sound design by Matt Kielty, Jeremy Bloom, and Simon Adler. Mixing help from Arianne Wack. Special thanks to Rebecca Boyle, Patrick Leverone and Daryl Pitts at the Maine Gem and Mineral Museum in Bethel Maine, Renee Weber, Paul M. Sutter, Matt Siegler, Sarah Noble, and Chucky P. EPISODE CREDITS:  Reported by - Molly Webster, Pat Walters, Becca Bressler, Alan Goffinski, Maria Paz Guttierez, Sarah Qari, Simon Adler and Alex NeasonProduced by -Matt Kielty, Becca Bressler, Pat Walters, Maria Paz Guttierrez, Alan Goffinski and Simon AdlerOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Matt Kielty, Jeremy Bloom and Simon Adlerwith mixing help from  - Arianne WackFact-checking by - Natalie Middleton and Diane Kelleyand Edited by  - Pat Walters and Becca Bressler EPISODE CITATIONS: Books - Rebecca Boyle’s book, [Our Moon: How the Earth’s Celestial Companion Transformed the Planet, Guided Evolution and Made Us Who We Are.] (https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/611468/our-moon-by-rebecca-boyle/) [PEOPLE IN NORTH AMERICA, HERE'S HOW TO RECYCLE YOUR USED ECLIPSE GLASSES (] (https://www.space.com/how-to-recycle-solar-eclipse-glasses) [https://zpr.io/D6wB7dA4Sb3m)] (https://zpr.io/D6wB7dA4Sb3m) *unless you want to hold onto them till the next one on August 23rd, 2044 Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

05 Apr 2024

49 MINS

49:13

05 Apr 2024


#137

Short Cuts: Drawn Onward

As a treat for the first palindrome date of the calendar year 2024, 4/2/24, (for those who use U.S. formatting of dates anyway), we are releasing a special audio palindrome. A piece that plays the same forward and backward. It’s called “Drawn Onward” and it comes from the producers Alan Goffinski and Sarita Bhatt. It originally aired on the wonderful BBC show [Short Cuts] (https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m001r82f) which curates fresh, experimental, adventurous audio journeys.  Special thanks to Alan Goffinski, Sarita Bhatt, Josie Long, Eleanor McDowall, BBC Short Cuts EPISODE CREDITS:  Reported by - Alan Goffinski, Sarita BhattProduced by - Axel Kacoutiéwith help from - Alan Goffinski, Sarita BhattOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Alan GoffinskiMixed by - Axel Kacoutié EPISODE CITATIONS: Articles - BBC Short Cuts full episode: [Meeting Myself Coming Back] (https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m001r82f) Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

02 Apr 2024

13 MINS

13:33

02 Apr 2024


#136

Finding Emilie

This is a segment we first aired back in 2011. In it, we hear a story of a very different kind of lost and found. Alan Lundgard, a college art student, fell in love with a fellow art student, Emilie Gossiaux. Nine months after Alan and Emilie made it official, Emilie's mom, Susan Gossiaux, received a terrible phone call from Alan. Together, Susan and Alan tell Jad and Robert about the devastating fork in the road that left Emilie lost in a netherworld, and how Alan found her again. Then, at the end of the episode, and a full decade later, we catch up with Emilie and talk about her art, her heart, a dog named London, and the movie The Fifth Element.  EPISODE CITATIONS - Exhibitions: [Emilie L. Gossiaux - Other-Worlding] (https://queensmuseum.org/exhibition/other-worlding/) (https://queensmuseum.org/exhibition/other-worlding/) at the Queen’s County Museum, through April, 7th, 2024.  Video: [A video of Emilie Gossiaux painting with the BrainPort] (https://youtu.be/1xYi9oZMVWI?si=kDBtRlVE62g9AI0V) (https://youtu.be/1xYi9oZMVWI?si=kDBtRlVE62g9AI0V)   Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. Sign up (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of The Lab (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing radiolab@wnyc.org. Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

22 Mar 2024

38 MINS

38:35

22 Mar 2024


#135

Throughline: Dare to Dissent

On today’s show, we’re excited to share an episode from our friends at the podcast [Throughline] (https://www.npr.org/podcasts/510333/throughline) .  Sometimes, the most dangerous and powerful thing a person can do is to stand up not against their enemies, but against their friends. As the United States heads into what will likely be another bitter and divided election year, there will be more and more pressure to stand with our in-groups rather than our consciences. So the Throughline team decided to tell some of the stories of people who have stood up to that kind of pressure. Some are names we know; others we likely never will. What those people did, what it cost them, and why they did it anyway. Check out the full version of “Dare to Dissent” here:  [https://www.npr.org/2023/11/30/1198908264/dare-to-dissent] (https://www.npr.org/2023/11/30/1198908264/dare-to-dissent)   EPISODE CITATIONS: Books - [Defying Hitler: the White Rose Pamphlet] (https://zpr.io/wAXJuTzqFBvw) ( [https://zpr.io/wAXJuTzqFBvw] (https://zpr.io/wAXJuTzqFBvw) ), by Alexandra Lloyd, fellow by special election in German at the University of Oxford. [King: A Life] (https://zpr.io/iGAEggJJnFNE) ( [https://zpr.io/iGAEggJJnFNE] (https://zpr.io/iGAEggJJnFNE) ), by Johnathan Eig.  Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) ( [https://radiolab.org/newsletter] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) )! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) ( [https://members.radiolab.org/] (https://members.radiolab.org/) ) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

15 Mar 2024

41 MINS

41:02

15 Mar 2024


#134

Staph Retreat

What happens when you combine an axe-wielding microbiologist and a disease-obsessed historian? A strange brew that's hard to resist, even for a modern day microbe. In the war on devilish microbes, our weapons are starting to fail us.  The antibiotics we once wielded like miraculous flaming swords seem more like lukewarm butter knives. But today we follow an odd couple to a storied land of elves and dragons. There, they uncover a 1000-year-old secret that makes us reconsider our most basic assumptions about human progress and wonder: What if the only way forward is backward? Reported by Latif Nasser. Produced by Matt Kielty and Soren Wheeler. Special thanks to Steve Diggle, Professor Roberta Frank, Alexandra Reider and Justin Park (our Old English readers), Gene Murrow from Gotham Early Music Scene, Marcia Young for her performance on the medieval harp and Collin Monro of Tadcaster and the rest of the Barony of Iron Bog. Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) ( [https://radiolab.org/newsletter] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) )! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) ( [https://members.radiolab.org/] (https://members.radiolab.org/) ) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

08 Mar 2024

31 MINS

31:03

08 Mar 2024


#133

Hold On

Two years ago, the United States did something amazing. In response to the mental health crisis the federal government launched 988 - a nationwide, easy to remember phone number that anyone can call anytime and talk to a counselor. It was 911 but for mental health and they hoped that it would save lives. However, if you call 988 today the first thing you hear isn’t a sympathetic counselor. What you hear is hold music. Today, the story of the highest stakes hold music in the universe, the three men who created suicide prevention and the two women trying to fix it.  Special thanks to Dr. Matt Wray, Sherbert Willows, Dani Bennett & Monica Johnson, Shari Sinwelski & the folks at Didi Hirsch, David Green, Jay Kennedy S. Carey & JagJaguwar Records,  and George Colt for sharing his cassette taped interviews of Ed Schneidman with us. EPISODE CREDITS:  Reported by - Simon Adler Produced by - Simon Adler Fact-checking by - Natalie Middleton and Edited by  - Pat Walters Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

01 Mar 2024

47 MINS

47:35

01 Mar 2024


#132

G: The World's Smartest Animal

This episode begins with a rant. This rant, in particular, comes from Dan Engber - a science writer who loves animals but despises animal intelligence research. Dan told us that so much of the way we study animals involves tests that we think show a human is smart ... not the animals we intend to study.  Dan’s rant got us thinking: What is the smartest animal in the world? And if we threw out our human intelligence rubric, is there a fair way to figure it out? Obviously, there is. And it’s a live game show, judged by Jad, Robert … and a dog. The last episode of G, our series on intelligence, was recorded as a live show back in May 2019 at the Greene Space in New York City and now we’re sharing that game show with you, again. Two science writers, Dan Engber and Laurel Braitman, and two comedians, Tracy Clayton and Jordan Mendoza, compete against one another to find the world’s smartest animal. They treated us to a series of funny, delightful stories about unexpectedly smart animals and helped us shift the way we think about intelligence across all the animals - including us. Special thanks to Bill Berloni and Macy (the dog) and everyone at The Greene Space. EPISODE CITATIONS: Podcasts:If you want to listen to more of the RADIOLAB G SERIES, [CLICK HERE] (https://radiolab.org/series/radiolab-presents-g) ( [https://radiolab.org/series/radiolab-presents-g] (https://radiolab.org/series/radiolab-presents-g) ).  Videos: Check out the video of our live event [here!] (https://fb.watch/qczu3n1ooA/) (https://fb.watch/qczu3n1ooA/) Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

16 Feb 2024

50 MINS

50:20

16 Feb 2024


#131

Cheating Death

In this episode, Maria Paz Gutiérrez does battle against the one absolute truth of human existence and all life… death. After getting a team of scientists to stand in for death (the grim reaper wasn’t available), we parry and thrust our way through the myriad ways that death comes for us - from falling pianos to evolution’s disinterest in longevity. In the process, we see if we can find a satisfying answer to the question “why do we have to die” and find ourselves face to face with the bitter end of everything that ever existed.Special thanks to Wayne Coyne of the Flaming Lips, Steven Nadler, Beth Jarosz, Anjana Badrinarayanan, Shaon Chakrabarti, Bob Horvitz, John K. Davis, Jessica Brand, Chandan K. Sen, Cole Imperi, Carl Bergstrom, Erin Gentry -Lam, and Jared Silvia.  This episode was made in loving memory of Dali Rodriguez. EPISODE CREDITS - Reported by - Maria Paz GutiérrezProduced by - Maria Paz Gutiérrezwith help from - Alyssa Jeong Perry and Timmy BroderickOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Maria Paz Gutiérrez and Jeremy Bloomwith mixing help from - Arianne WackFact-checking by - Emily Krieger Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

09 Feb 2024

41 MINS

41:49

09 Feb 2024


#130

G: Relative Genius

Albert Einstein asked that when he died, his body be cremated and his ashes be scattered in a secret location. He didn’t want his grave, or his body, becoming a shrine to his genius. When he passed away in the early morning hours of April, 18, 1955, his family knew his wishes. There was only one problem: the pathologist who did the autopsy had different plans. In the third episode of “G”, Radiolab’s miniseries on intelligence, first aired back in 2019 we go on one of the strangest scavenger hunts for genius the world has ever seen. We follow Einstein’s stolen brain from that Princeton autopsy table, to a cider box in Wichita, Kansas, to labs all across the country. And eventually, beyond the brain itself entirely. All the while wondering, where exactly is the genius of a man who changed the way we view the world?  Special thanks to: Elanor Taylor, Claudia Kalb, Dustin O’Halloran, Deborah Lee and Tim Huson. If you want to listen to more of BLINDSPOT: THE PLAGUE IN THE SHADOWS, [SUBSCRIBE HERE] (https://link.chtbl.com/blindspotpodcast?sid=radiolab) (https://link.chtbl.com/blindspotpodcast?sid=radiolab). New episodes come out on Thursdays. EPISODE CITATIONSPodcasts:If you want to listen to more of the RADIOLAB G SERIES, [CLICK HERE] (https://radiolab.org/series/radiolab-presents-g) ( [https://radiolab.org/series/radiolab-presents-g] (https://radiolab.org/series/radiolab-presents-g) ).  Websites: [The Einstein Papers Project] (https://www.einstein.caltech.edu/) : https://www.einstein.caltech.edu/ Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

02 Feb 2024

1 HR 14 MINS

1:14:39

02 Feb 2024


#129

Zoozve

As co-host Latif Nasser was putting his kid to bed one night, he noticed something weird on a solar system poster up on the wall: Venus had a moon called … Zoozve.  But when he called NASA to ask them about it, they had never heard of Zoozve, and besides that, they insisted that Venus doesn’t have any moons.  So begins a tiny mystery that leads to a newly discovered kind of object in our solar system, one that is simultaneously a moon, but also not a moon, and one that waltzes its way into asking one of the most profound questions about our universe:  How predictable is it, really? And what does that mean for our place in it?We have some exciting news! In this “Zoozve” episode, Radiolab named its first-ever quasi-moon, and now it's your turn! Radiolab has teamed up with @The International Astronomical Union to launch a global naming contest for one of Earth’s quasi-moons. This is your chance to make your mark on the heavens. Submit your name ideas now through September, or vote on your favorites starting in November: [https://radiolab.org/moon] (https://radiolab.org/moon)  (edited) Special Thanks to Larry Wasserman and everyone else at the Lowell Observatory, Rich Kremer and Marcelo Gleiser of Dartmouth College, Benjamin Sharkey at the University of Maryland. Thanks to the IAU and their Working Group for Small Bodies Nomenclature, as well as to the Bamboo Forest class of kindergarteners and first graders.  EPISODE CREDITS -Reported by - Latif Nasserwith help from - Ekedi Fausther-Keeys and Alyssa Jeong PerryProduced by - Sarah Qariwith help from - Alyssa Jeong PerryOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Sarah Qari and Jeremy Bloomwith mixing help from - Arianne WackFact-checking by - Diane Kellyand Edited by  - Becca BresslerEPISODE CITATIONS -  Articles: Check out the paper by Seppo Mikkola, Paul Wiegert (whose voices are in the episode) along with colleagues Kimmo Innanen and Ramon Brasser describing this new type of object [here] (https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/351/3/L63/1055809) ( [https://zpr.io/Ci4B3sGWZ3xi] (https://zpr.io/Ci4B3sGWZ3xi) ). The Official Rules and Guidelines for Naming Non-Cometary Small Solar-System Bodies from the IAU Working Group on Small Body Nomenclature can be found [here] (https://www.wgsbn-iau.org/documentation/NamesAndCitations.pdf) ( [https://zpr.io/kuBJYQAiCy7s] (https://zpr.io/kuBJYQAiCy7s) ). All the specs on our strange friend can be found [here] (https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/tools/sbdb_lookup.html#/?sstr=2002VE68) ( [https://zpr.io/Tzg2sHhAp2kb] (https://zpr.io/Tzg2sHhAp2kb) ). Check out Liz Landau’s work at [NASA's Curious Universe podcast ] (https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/atlkC9rykpU20RzjUoENbq?domain=nasa.gov/) [https://zpr.io/QRbgZbMU2gWW] (https://zpr.io/QRbgZbMU2gWW) ) [ ] (https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/atlkC9rykpU20RzjUoENbq?domain=nasa.gov/) as well as [lizlandau.com] (https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/bcxrC0RmW2SmxJkzuD4MOz?domain=lizlandau.com) Videos: Fascinating little animation of [a horseshoe orbit] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horseshoe_orbit#/media/File:Animation_of_(419624)_2010_SO16_orbit.gif) ( [https://zpr.io/A9y6qHhzZtpA] (https://zpr.io/A9y6qHhzZtpA) ), [a tadpole orbit] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horseshoe_orbit#/media/File:Animation_of_2010_TK7.gif) ( [https://zpr.io/4qBDbgumhLf2] (https://zpr.io/4qBDbgumhLf2) ), and [a quasi-moon orbit] (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/transcoded/5/59/Asteroid2016HO3-SunEarthOrbit.webm/Asteroid2016HO3-SunEarthOrbit.webm.480p.vp9.webm) ( [https://zpr.io/xtLhwQFGZ4Eh] (https://zpr.io/xtLhwQFGZ4Eh) ).  Posters: If you’d like to buy (or even just look at) Alex Foster’s Solar System poster (featuring Zoozve of course), check it out [here] (https://www.alex-foster.com/shop/p/solar-system-map-illustrated-art-print) ( [https://zpr.io/dcqVEgHP43SJ] (https://zpr.io/dcqVEgHP43SJ) ). First 75 new annual sign-ups to our membership program The Lab get one free, autographed by Alex! Existing members of The Lab, look out for a discount code! Sign-up for our newsletter. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) .Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

26 Jan 2024

54 MINS

54:52

26 Jan 2024


#128

The Living Room

We're thrilled to present a piece from one of our favorite podcasts, Love + Radio (Nick van der Kolk and Brendan Baker).  Producer Briana Breen brings us the story: Diane’s new neighbors across the way never shut their curtains, and that was the beginning of an intimate, but very one-sided relationship. Please listen to [as much of Love + Radio as you can] (http://loveandradio.org/) (loveandradio.org). And, if you are in Seattle Area, or plan to be on Feb 15th, 2024 come check out [Radiolab Live! and in person] (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/radiolab-live-how-the-cassette-tape-changed-us-tickets-727065130377?aff=oddtdtcreator) (https://zpr.io/fCDUTEYju76h).  Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)!Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today.Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

19 Jan 2024

25 MINS

25:46

19 Jan 2024


#127

Our Little Stupid Bodies

Sometimes a seemingly silly question gets stuck in your craw and you can’t shake the feeling that something big lies behind it. We are constantly collecting these kinds of questions from our listeners, not to mention piling up a storehouse of our own “stupid” questions, as we lovingly call them. And a little while back, we noticed a little cluster of questions that seemed to have a shared edgy energy, and all led us to the same place: Our own bodies. So, today on Radiolab, we go down our throats and get under our skin, we take on evolution and anatomy and molecular cosmetics, to discover some very not-stupid answers to our seemingly stupid questions.  Special thanks to Mark Krasnow, Sachi Mulkey, Kari Leibowitz, Andrea Evers, Dr. Mona Amin, Benjamin Ungar, Praby Singh, Brye and Rachel Adler EPISODE CREDITS:  Reported by - Molly Webster, Becca Bressler, Latif Nasser, and Alan Goffinskiwith help from Ekedi Fausther-KeeysProduced by - Sindhu Gnanasambandan, Becca Bressler, Alyssa Jeong Perry, Molly Webster with help from - Matt KieltyOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Jeremy Bloom with mixing help from - Arianne WackFact-checking by - Diane Kelley, Emily Kriegerand edited by  - Pat Walters and Alex Neason   Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.   ... Read more

12 Jan 2024

55 MINS

55:39

12 Jan 2024


#126

Stochasticity

First aired way back in 2009, this episode is all about a wonderfully slippery and smarty-pants word for randomness, Stochasticity, and how it may be at the very foundation of our lives. Along the way, we talk to a woman suddenly consumed by a frenzied gambling addiction, hear from two friends whose meeting seems to defy pure chance, and take a close look at some very noisy bacteria. EPISODE CITATIONS: Videos - [Stochasticity Music Video] (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OHbW0pGQWY) ( [https://zpr.io/uZiH9j9ZU6be] (https://zpr.io/uZiH9j9ZU6be) ) Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) .   Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

05 Jan 2024

51 MINS

51:47

05 Jan 2024


#125

Zeroworld

Karim Ani dedicated his life to math. He studied it in school, got a degree in math education, even founded [Citizen Math] (http://www.citizenmath.com) to teach it to kids in a whole new way. But, this whole time, his whole life, almost, he had this question nagging at him. The question came in the form of a rule in math, NEVER divide by zero. But, why not? Cornell mathematician, and friend of the show, Steve Strogatz, chimes in with the historical context, citing examples of previous provocateurs looking to break the rules of math. And he offers Karim a warning, “In math we have creative freedom, we can do anything we want, as long as it’s logical.”Listen along as Karim’s thought exercise becomes an existential quest, taking us with him, as he delves deeper, and deeper, into Zeroworld. EPISODE CREDITS: Reported by - Lulu MillerProduced by - Matthew Kieltywith help from - Ekedi Fausther-Keeys, Alyssa Jeong PerryOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Matthew Kieltywith mixing help from - Arianne WackFact-checking by - Diane Kellyand Edited by - Pat Walters Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) ! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing radiolab@wnyc.org.   Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

29 Dec 2023

33 MINS

33:47

29 Dec 2023


#124

Numbers

First aired back in 2009, this episode is all about one thing, or rather a collection of things. Whether you love 'em or hate 'em, chances are you rely on numbers every day of your life. Where do they come from, and what do they really do for us? This hour: stories of how numbers confuse us, connect us, and even reveal secrets about us. ... Read more

22 Dec 2023

59 MINS

59:59

22 Dec 2023


#123

Death Interrupted

As a lifeguard, a paramedic, and then an ER doctor, Blair Bigham found his calling: saving lives. But when he started to work in the ICU, he slowly realized that sometimes keeping people (and their hopes) alive just prolongs the suffering. He wrote a book arguing that a too-late death is just as bad as a too-early one, and that physicians and the public alike need to get better at accepting the inevitability of death sooner.  As the book hit the bestseller list, Blair’s own father got diagnosed with a deadly case of pancreatic cancer. Blair’s every impulse was in direct contradiction of the book he just wrote. What should he do? And how can any of us know when to stop fighting death and when to start making peace with it?Special thanks to Lucie Howell and Heather Haley.EPISODE CREDITS:  Reported by - Latif NasserProduced by - Simon Adlerwith help from - Alyssa Jeong PerryOriginal music and sound design contributed by - Simon Adlerwith mixing help from - Arianne WackFact-checking by - Natalie Middletonand edited by - Pat Walters EPISODE CITATIONS: Books:  Blair Bigham, [Death Interrupted: How Modern Medicine is Complicating the Way We Die] (https://store.walrusmagazine.com/products/death-interrupted) (https://zpr.io/a33mEMW64X5h)   Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [X] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

15 Dec 2023

24 MINS

24:05

15 Dec 2023


#122

A 4-Track Mind

In this short episode that first aired in 2011, a neurologist issues a dare to a ragtime piano player and a famous conductor. When the two men face off in an fMRI machine, the challenge is so unimaginably difficult that one man instantly gives up. But the other achieves a musical feat that ought to be impossible. Reporter Jessica Benko went to Michigan to visit Bob Milne, one of the best ragtime piano players in the world, and a preternaturally talented musician. Usually, Bob sticks to playing piano for small groups of ragtime enthusiasts, but he recently caught the attention of Penn State neuroscientist Kerstin Bettermann, who had heard that Bob had a rare talent: He can play technically challenging pieces of music on demand while carrying on a conversation and cracking jokes. According to Kerstin, our brains just aren't wired for that. So she decided to investigate Bob's brain, and along the way she discovered that Bob has an even more amazing ability—one that we could hardly believe and science can't explain. Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up ] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (https://members.radiolab.org/) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing radiolab@wnyc.org. Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

08 Dec 2023

21 MINS

21:05

08 Dec 2023


#121

Boy Man

Could puberty get any more awkward? Turns out, yes. Writer Patrick Burleigh started going through puberty as a toddler. He had pubic hair before he was two years old and a mustache by middle school. All of this was thanks to a rare genetic mutation that causes testotoxicosis, also known as precocious puberty. From the moment he was born, abnormally high levels of testosterone coursed through his body, just as it had in his father’s body, his grandfather’s body, and his great-grandfather’s body. On this week’s episode, Patrick’s premature coming of age story helps us understand just why puberty is so awkward for all of us, and whether and how it helps forge us into the adults we all become. Special thanks to Craig Cox, Nick Burleigh, and Alyssa Voss at the NIH. EPISODE CREDITS: Reported by - Latif Nasserwith help from - Kelsey Padgett, Ekedi Fausther-Keeys, and Alyssa Jeong PerryProduced by - Pat Walters, Alex Neason, and Alyssa Jeong Perry with help from - Ekedi Fausther-Keyes and Matt Kieltywith mixing help from - Arianne WackFact-checking by - Diane A. Kellyand Edited by  - Pat Walters   EPISODE CITATIONS:Music -  " [The Light] (https://catelebon.bandcamp.com/track/the-light-2) " by Cate Le Bon & Group Listening. Articles - To read Patrick’s own writing about his experience with precocious puberty and to see photos of him as a child, check out his article in The Cut, [“A 4-Year-Old Trapped in a Teenager’s Body”] (https://www.thecut.com/2019/01/precocious-puberty-patrick-burleigh.html)  ( [https://zpr.io/athKVQmtfzaN] (https://zpr.io/athKVQmtfzaN) ) In her spare time, our fact checker Diane Kelly is also a comparative anatomist, and you can hear her TEDMED talk, “ [What We Didn’t Know about Penis Anatomy] (https://www.ted.com/talks/diane_kelly_what_we_didn_t_know_about_penis_anatomy/) ” ( [https://zpr.io/MWHFTYBdubHj] (https://zpr.io/MWHFTYBdubHj) )  Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. [Sign up] (https://radiolab.org/newsletter) (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of [The Lab] (http://members.radiolab.org) (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on [Instagram] (http://instagram.com/radiolab) , [Twitter] (http://twitter.com/radiolab) and [Facebook] (http://facebook.com/radiolab) @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing [radiolab@wnyc.org] (mailto:radiolab@wnyc.org) . Leadership support for Radiolab’s science programming is provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation Initiative, and the John Templeton Foundation. Foundational support for Radiolab was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... Read more

01 Dec 2023

53 MINS

53:15

01 Dec 2023