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Woman's Hour podcast

Woman's Hour

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

 

#300

Hillary Rodham Clinton and Louise Penny, HPV kits, Aspire to adventure

The former presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton has a new book out, “State of Terror”, a political thriller written with the award winning author Louise Penny. The two women were already friends before deciding to pen the novel which features a President who “smells of meat” and appears to resemble Donald Trump and a British Prime Minister who’s “a twit” and seems to have a more than a passing resemblance to Boris Johnson. Anita Rani talks to the duo about their collaboration and some of the uncanny parallels between “State of Terror” and global politics today. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common virus – Cancer Research UK estimates around 8 out of 10 people will be infected at some point in their lives. HPV spreads through sexual activity. In most people, it doesn’t cause any problems and goes away on its own, but HPV can increase a woman’s chance of developing cervical cancer. Gynaecological charity The Eve Appeal have found a ‘worrying’ trend in HPV kits being sold online by private companies, advertised alongside misleading information. Tracie Miles is a gynaecologist cancer specialist nurse at The Eve Appeal. Mercedes Gleeson is someone who has been open about her own experience with HPV. Anita is joined by two guests who are trying to encourage women to get outside and go on adventures. Army Officer Preet Chandi is preparing for a solo, unsupported trek across Antarctica to the South Pole in November. She will be the first Asian woman to do this. Dr Geeta Ludhra set up a walking group in the Chilterns to encourage women from diverse backgrounds to get out on smaller scale adventures in the UK to connect with nature and feel the health benefits. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucinda Montefiore ... Read more

22 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:33

22 Oct 2021


#299

Singer Ella Eyre; Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah; Sofie Hagen; Neonatal deaths & stillbirth disparities;...

Over the summer it's been tempting to think that the pandemic is almost over. But last night, Health Secretary Savid Javid insisted that "life is not back to normal". 49,000 people tested positive for Covid-19 yesterday - levels we haven't seen since the end of last year - and he warned that they could hit 100,000 a day over winter. But despite all this, the government has decided not to implement its so-called Plan B - which would include mandatory mask wearing, working from home and vaccine passports. Instead its encouraging people to get their booster jabs, and advising people to make their own decisions on mask wearing and socialising more outside. But will the public, who've already seen one Christmas fall into oblivion, be willing to change their behaviour for a second winter? Campaigner Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah is raising awareness of asthma and the health problems that can be caused by air pollution. Last year her daughter, Ella, became the first person in Britain to have air pollution listed as the cause of death after an inquest. She died in 2013 aged nine. Now Rosamund is calling on Boris Johnson to “set an example for the whole world” with ambitious clear air goals. The Environment Bill was debated in the House of Commons yesterday (Wednesday). Rosamund discusses her work and the changes she wants to see. Lockdowns and working from home have changed how we dress but 'fat people don't have the luxury of wearing the dressed down look'. That's according to the activist and stand-up comedian Sofie Hagen who says that society dictates that people who are over-weight have to look like they are trying. She and Emma discuss the pressures she believes exist. Mortality rates remain exceptionally high for babies from ethnically diverse backgrounds despite overall rates of stillbirth and neonatal death rates having fallen. Neonatal death rates are 73% higher than those living in the least deprived areas. With Asian babies 60% higher than white babies, and 43% greater for babies of Black ethnicity. Emma is joined by Clea Harmer, Chief Executive of SANDS, and Professor of Perinatal & Paediatric Epidemiology, Elizabeth Draper part of the MBRRACE team who collect and analyse the numbers and rates of baby deaths in the UK. After undergoing vocal chord surgery, MOBO and Brit award-winning singer songwriter Ella Eyre is back on her first headline tour in six years. She reveals how she's had to learn how to sing again - and how the experience has inspired a new musical direction. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Harriet Baldwin Interviewed Guest: Professor Stephen Reicher Interviewed Guest: Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah Interviewed Guest: Sofie Hagen Interviewed Guest: Clea Harmer Interviewed Guest: Professor Elizabeth Draper Interviewed Guest: Ella Eyre ... Read more

21 Oct 2021

56 MINS

56:45

21 Oct 2021


#298

Baroness Ruth Davidson; The science of knitting; Spiking by injection

Former Scottish Conservative leader – the recently ennobled Baroness Davidson of Lundin Links - will be giving her maiden speech in the House of Lords on Friday as part of a debate on assisted dying. She used to be against amending the law on assisted dying but had a change of heart last year. She explains why to Emma. The Home Secretary Priti Patel has requested an urgent update from the police following a spate of recent cases where women's drinks have been spiked. With multiple reports also emerging of women being spiked by injection in clubs in Glasgow and Nottingham, journalist and author Lucy Ward last night shared texts from her student daughter on Twitter- Lucy speaks to Emma. Are you a keen knitter? Have you ever considered that patterns for knitting your jumpers, hats or gloves could be seen as having parallels to computer coding? Do we undervalue the scientific aspects of some female-dominated skills? Emma speaks to Shetland knitter and pattern writer Hazel Tindall - aka World's Fastest Knitter - and to Sue Montgomery, who went viral in 2019 for knitting data into a shawl. Women Talk Back, a feminist society at Bristol University is filing a legal case today against Bristol Students' Union, after they say they were sanctioned by the union for running women-only meetings. This issue came to a head last March when they refused admission at one of their events to a trans woman. Raquel Rosario Sanchez is the President of the group and joins Emma. A company that speed-grows coral in the Bahamas is among the winners of the inaugural Earthshot Prize – the new annual awards created by the Duke of Cambridge to reward people trying to save the planet. There were five winners announced at the star-studded ceremony in London on Sunday, each receiving £1m. Alannah Vellacott is Coral Vita's Coral Restoration Specialist and takes Emma through the process and why it's so important. ... Read more

20 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:40

20 Oct 2021


#297

Dame Eileen Atkins; Equal pay; Harassment in Parliament; Composer Charlotte Bray

In our final discussion to mark our 75th anniversary we look at the issue of equal pay. This was identified as the area women most want to see change in their daily lives and 70% of those asked said they had experienced inequality in this area. Emma Barnett talks to Baroness Kishwer Falkner who’s head of the Equality and Human Rights Commission which regulates the Equality Act and also to Emma Satyamurti a lawyer leading a group action for equal pay by female staff working in Morrisons. Dame Eileen Atkins joins Emma to talk about the journey from being Tottenham's answer to Shirley Temple to hugely respected actor for stage, screen and TV. Her memoir is called 'Will She Do?' Today MPs are going to debate new government plans that would mean members who are suspended for sexual harassment or bullying could face a by-election. Labour want the measure to apply retrospectively - so that it would include the Conservative MP Rob Roberts who was suspended from Parliament for six weeks in May after an independent panel found he had sexually harassed a former employee. He did not face a petition to trigger a by-election due to a loophole in parliamentary procedure - because the panel that handed down his suspension doesn't have those powers. BBC political correspondent, Chris Mason, explains. Composer Charlotte Bray has composed new song cycle called Crossing Faultlines. Believed to be the first of its kind to address the topic of women in the workplace, the song cycle explores themes of mentorship, discrimination and ambition. The piece was commissioned as part of a new recital programme dream.risk.sing: elevating women’s voices, an initiative conceived to express women’s stories through song. Emma is joined by Charlotte Bray, Samantha Crawford and Lana Bode. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Anna Lacey Interviewed Guest: Baroness Kishwer Falkner Interviewed Guest: Emma Satyamurti Interviewed Guest: Eileen Atkins Interviewed Guest: Charlotte Bray Interviewed Guest: Samantha Crawford Interviewed Guest: Lana Bode ... Read more

19 Oct 2021

56 MINS

56:29

19 Oct 2021


#296

Women pig farmers and mental health. Modern slavery. The cave woman rebuilding her business after Co...

According to a new survey on mental wellbeing in agriculture, 58% of women in farming experience anxiety compared to 44% of men. What's the reason behind it? How much impact has Brexit and the pandemic had on the problem? We discuss with Alicia Chivers, Chief Executive of the Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution, and East Yorkshire pig farmer Kate Moore. Conservative MP Sir David Ames, who was killed on Friday had been in Parliament since 1983 . Issues raised by the people he represented were top of his agenda. When a woman called Carla came and told him about how her life was blighted by endometriosis, he took up the cause. We hear from the former Labour MP for Dewsbury, who he worked with on this issue while she was in the House, despite them being politically poles apart. We've been following the work of the Salvation Army who have the Home Office contract to support all victims of modern slavery in England and Wales and have been given exclusive access to their annual report which shows that demand for their services is soaring. Young Albanian women make up the largest group of survivors who escape from their traffickers after being sexually exploited. Many of these women are waiting to hear if the Home Secretary will appeal against what's described as a landmark High Court ruling last week. It was brought by a Vietnamese woman who was trafficked to the UK and if upheld will affect hundreds of others like her. We hear from Ahmed Aydeed from law firm Duncan Lewis the woman's solicitor. Plus reporter Carolyn Atkinson talks to a survivor and to Kathy Betteridge, Major Director of Anti Trafficking and Modern Slavery at the Salvation Army. Plus Emma the Yorkshire woman who spent over a hundred hours in a cave. Lisa Bowerman owns Stump Cross Caverns, She runs the caves as a family business and they'll usually a big attraction for tourists. She explains why she hopes the stunt will give the business a lift post-covid.. Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell ... Read more

18 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:46

18 Oct 2021


#295

Cush Jumbo, Predatory marriage, Equality in 2021, Tall women and dating, Sexual assault, consent and...

Cush Jumbo, star of The Good Wife and The Good Fight on her latest role playing Hamlet. Predatory marriage involves a vulnerable adult being led into a marriage, which financially benefits their new spouse. We hear from Daphne Franks, who believes that her mother was a victim of a predatory marriage. Your responses to our poll on equality in 2021. What's it like for tall women when it comes to dating? Comedian Andrea Hubert, and Sarah Ivens, author of Get Real discuss. In her new book Rough, Rachel Thompson looks at how violence has found its way into the bedroom. A study released this summer set out to gauge the extent of violence against women. One shocking finding revealed that half of respondents had "woken up to their male partner having sex with them or performing sex acts on them whilst they are asleep." Rachel Thompson and Dr Jessica Taylor, co author: Understanding the Scale of Violence Committed Against Women in the UK Since Birth. Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Dianne McGregor ... Read more

16 Oct 2021

44 MINS

44:38

16 Oct 2021


#294

Tall women and dating, Vicky Featherstone on Maryland, Blackfishing, Equality in housework, Keisha t...

The average height of a female in the UK is 5ft 3in. What is life like for women at the other end of the spectrum, especially when it comes to dating? Jessica Creighton is joined by the author of Get Real, Sarah Ivens, who at 6ft would be introduced to dates as 'Queen Kong' or 'Miss Stretchy', and married at 6 ft 3 in in a pair of diamanté heels; and Andrea Hubert, 6ft 1in whose creative comebacks about her height paved the way to her becoming a comedian. Normally it would take a playwright like Lucy Kirkwood two years to write a play and get it onto the stage. However the relentless news of violence against women and the abuse of police powers in recent weeks compelled her to script a thirty minute piece called Maryland in just a few days and send it to the Royal Court Theatre in London. That was three weeks ago...two weeks ago it opened on stage. The Royal Court’s Artistic Director, Vicky Featherstone joins Jessica Creighton to explain why. After struggling with her mental health whilst part of girl-band Little Mix and then quitting late last year, Jesy Nelson has just launched her solo career with a video for her single 'Boyz' that's been criticised for 'blackfishing'. So what is that and why is it problematic? Jess is joined by Leah Mahon, journalist at the Voice online. The Woman’s Hour poll to mark our 75th anniversary found the place where women feel most unequal is in the home - specifically in terms of housework. 75% of the women said the division of chores wasn’t fair but interestingly it was only named as the fifth most important area in which to achieve equality. Jessica talks to Professor Ann Oakley whose seminal book The Sociology of Housework looked at these issues way back in the seventies and also by Professor Rosie Cox who has written a number of books on gender roles. In 2005 the story of Keisha the Sket started being shared by young people on a now defunct early internet platform. The story is told in energetic street slang. Keisha, 17, lives in Hackney, London. She's lively and funny - she is also preyed upon. She wants and enjoys sex and is looking for love but she is sexualised by the men and boys around her. Her lack of control of her life gets her into dangerous situations and the word 'sket' - promiscuous girl or woman - follows her around. It's been called a classic of Black British culture and is now being published for the first time in book form. Jade LB began writing Keisha's story when she was only 13 and joins Jessica to talk about her creation and the mixed feelings she has had about it over the years. ... Read more

15 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:25

15 Oct 2021


#293

Singer, Sophie Ellis-Bextor; Breast reconstruction delays; Urban hermits; Predatory marriage;

Sophie Ellis-Bextor has seven albums, five children, a podcast and her Live Kitchen Discos during lockdown were a means of virtual escapism for many, and became weekly moments of united sequined catharsis. She joins Emma to discuss her memoir Spinning Plates: Music, Men, Motherhood and Me. Claudia Webbe, a former Labour MP for Leicester East, who now sits as an independent, was found yesterday guilty of one charge of harassment and is awaiting sentencing. She has vowed to remain an MP while she appeals against the conviction but the Labour party has called for her to resign, strongly condemning her actions. Those actions include threatening a woman with sending naked photos of her to her family and that she would throw acid in her face. We hear from solicitor Ayesha Nayyar, who has acted for a number of acid attack victims and campaigns for better support for survivors. Surgeons say women are being refused reconstructive breast surgery on the NHS, even though there are now ways of performing the operation more quickly. The confederation of British surgery say the procedure can be reduced from the traditional 8-12 hours down to 2-3, and hospital stays from 7 days to just 72 hours. Yet surgeons say many NHS Trusts still deem breast reconstruction as ‘cosmetic’, and are performing less than two-thirds of the amount of reconstructions they were pre-Covid. There are an estimated 1000 hermits living in Italy - and the majority of them are women. The history of female hermits goes back hundreds of years, with many choosing to remove themselves from a life of marriage and domesticity to a world of study, devotion and freedom from the expectations of society. But what is it like to be a hermit living in the modern world? Emma speaks to urban hermit Julia Bolton-Holloway about the misconceptions people have about the eremitical life, her journey from university lecturer to Anglican nun and now Catholic hermit - and how she balances a life of poverty, chastity and obedience with a dedication to actively helping those most in need. Predatory marriage involves a vulnerable adult being led into a marriage which financially benefits their new spouse. We discuss with Daphne Franks, who believes that her mother was a victim of a predatory marriage; and Dr Rachael Clawson, Associate Professor in Social Work at the University of Nottingham. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Ayesha Nayyar Interviewed Guest: Nicola Johnston Interviewed Guest: Dhalia Masud Interviewed Guest: Julia Bolton-Holloway Interviewed Guest: Daphne Franks Interviewed Guest: Dr Rachael Clawson Interviewed Guest: Sophie Ellis-Bextor Photographer: Laura Lewis ... Read more

14 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:44

14 Oct 2021


#292

Lucy Mangan, Girls & Education in Afghanistan, Sexual Assault, Consent & 'Grey Areas'

Who does what in your home? Sourcing school shoes? Calling the plumber? Sorting the threadworms? In her debut novel 'Are We Having Fun Yet?' author and columnist Lucy Mangan reveals the comic diary of Liz who is 'outwardly mute, inwardly mutinous' as she does her best to keep the domestic show on the road. In her new book Rough, Rachel Thompson looks at how violence has found its way into the bedroom. A study released this summer set out to gauge the extent of violence against women. One shocking finding revealed that half of respondents had "woken up to their male partner having sex with them or performing sex acts on them whilst they are asleep." Emma discusses these findings and the impact on women with Rachel and Dr. Jessica Taylor, co author: Understanding the Scale of Violence Committed Against Women in the UK Since Birth. For 26 days teenage girls in Afghanistan haven't been able to go to school. The Taliban has banned them from secondary schools. If girls don't go to secondary school, that means they're unlikely to go to further education or university. Under their new government, Taliban officials said that women will be allowed to study and work in accordance with the group's interpretation of Islamic religious law. Emma discusses the current situation with Yalda Hakim, presenter on BBC World; and a teacher in Afghanistan. Presented by Emma Barnett ... Read more

13 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:15

13 Oct 2021


#291

Cush Jumbo on playing Hamlet; Reaction to our equality poll; Day of the Scientist

Radio DJ Emma Wilson believes that the policeman Wayne Couzens who kidnapped, raped and murdered Sarah Everard exposed himself to her in an alleyway some 13 years ago. Emma reported it to the police at the time – no action was taken, but she has decided to speak out now because when she did report it she was not happy with the response. One of the key findings of our equality poll to mark our 75th anniversary has been the extent to which women don’t feel equal when it comes to issues of sexual abuse and exploitation. Almost 70% of the women we asked said it was a concern and the issue is currently front and centre of the news agenda following the murders of Sarah Everard and Sabina Nessa to name just two women. Emma Barnett talks to the writer Joan Smith and the former Victims Commissioner the Conservative Peer Baroness Newlove who is unimpressed by Boris Johnson’s unwillingness to recognise misogyny as a hate crime and is trying to change the law on the issue. Probably best known to most for her television role as lawyer Lucca Quinn in The Good Wife and then the follow-up series The Good Fight, Cush Jumbo is currently playing Hamlet at the Young Vic in London. Delayed for a year by the pandemic, the play sold out months before opening. As the first woman of colour to play the part in a major production on a British stage she joins a list that goes back to 1741 of UK female actors playing the Prince of Denmark. Cush joins Emma. On Radio 4's Day of the Scientist, we looks at women's trust in science. The latest Public Attitudes to Science survey found that women are less likely to feel connected to science in their everyday lives; less likely to actively engage with science; and were less trusting of scientists and media reporting of scientific issues. What's going on to put women's faith in science on such shaky ground? Emma speaks to Megan Halpern, assistant professor in the history, philosophy and sociology of science at Michigan State University, and Dr Emily Dawson from University College London, who researches how people learn about and engage with science – and why so many women are being put off. Image: Cush Jumbo in Hamlet at the Young Vic Credit: Helen Murray ... Read more

12 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:32

12 Oct 2021


#290

As we mark our 75th anniversary, how do you feel about equality in 2021? Your chance to have your sa...

To mark our 75th anniversary last week we commissioned a poll to explore how you feel about equality in 2021 and how much progress you believe women have made since the first episode of Woman’s Hour was broadcast in 1949 Over two thirds of the women we spoke to said it was down to experiences of sexual exploitation and abuse while three while three quarters put it down to inequality within their homes because of the unfair division of housework.. What your reality? At the heart of our Poll the gap between the equality the law says we should have as women and the reality of our lives. How's your life compare to that of your mother or grand mother? How do you think we can achieve equality both in the home and in the workplace... What would help? Is more flexibility in the workplace and the same rewards as your male colleagues the answer. Or is the lack of childcare or help with older relatives that you care for the thing that's holding you back? What change or changes would you most like to see over the next 75 years? Lines are open at 8am on Monday morning. Text us on 84844 . On social media it’s @BBCwomanshour or you can email us via our website . Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell ... Read more

11 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:57

11 Oct 2021


#289

Weekend Woman's Hour: 75th Birthday, Mina Smallman, Celibacy, Professor Anita Hill

Baroness Brenda Hale is a former judge who served as the first female president of the Supreme Court. She has written a book, Spider Woman, that spans her life and work. We hear from Professor Anita Hill who thirty years ago faced an all-male, all-white Senate Judiciary Committee—led by the then, Senator Joe Biden—to testify that her boss, Supreme Court Justice nominee Clarence Thomas, had sexually harassed her. It was a landmark moment for these issues and inspired countless women to come forward with their stories, to file complaints, and even to run for office; creating an unintentional trail blazer. Abi Sampa describes herself as a "weird warbling electric Veena player". She trained as a dentist and then appeared on The Voice in 2013, where she wowed the judges with her unique style of as a fusion of western pop and Indian classical music. Over the last few years, the figures around celibacy have generally been on the rise - particular amongst young women. What’s to be gained from making this life choice? Anita speaks to sex therapist Danielle Bennett, and two women who have experience with celibacy. Laura Kennedy is in her 30’s and was celibate for six years. Shirley Yanez is in her 60's and became celibate as part of a conscious change in lifestyle. Mina Smallman, the mother of Nicole Smallman and Bibaa Henry, the sisters who were murdered in a North London park last year, speaks to us about her grief and women's safety. Joan Diana Gayford nee Wilson joined the BBC as a talks producer shortly after the Second World War. Not long after a new programme hit the airwaves. 75 years later, you can hear Emma talking to Diana Gayford who was working on Woman’s Hour when it first came to air at 2pm on 7th October 1946. ... Read more

09 Oct 2021

54 MINS

54:53

09 Oct 2021


#288

Musician & singer, Abi Sampa; Celibacy; Chinaza Onyechi; Femicide

Over the last few years, the figures around celibacy have generally been on the rise - particular amongst young women. What’s to be gained from making this life choice? And what should one know before deciding to become celibate? Anita speaks to sex therapist Danielle Bennett, and two women who have experience with celibacy. Laura Kennedy is in her 30’s and was celibate for six years. Shirley Yanez is in her 60s and became celibate as part of a conscious change in lifestyle. Chinaza Onyechi has always dreamed of becoming a film maker but she says like other children from a Nigerian background she was encouraged to take up a more traditional career like law, medicine or engineering. But she is now one step closer to that film-making dream, after being awarded the MetFilm School's first Black Student of Talent scholarship. The scholarship covers full tuition fees for a year and could be worth around £50,000 depending on the course. Susan Ogilvy rediscovered learning in her seventies. As a botanical artist from Somerset, she started a journey into painting nests she serendipitously found. This was the start of an ornithological education, specifically into birds nests. Ogilvy has since painted more than fifty bird nests from life, each time marvelling at its ingenious construction. They have been collated in her new book, Nests. The first in a genre that has been dominated by male authors with very little focus on birds nests. Do gender-neutral terms, such as "homicide" and "murder," systematically ignore targeted violence against women? Should femicide be seen as a separate category? If women are being killed specifically because they're women, does that matter? Do motives matter? Anita is joined by Karen Ingala Smith, co-founder of Femicide Census and Chief Exec of Nia, a charity that runs services for women and girls who have been subjected to sexual and domestic violence and abuse. Abi Sampa describes herself as a "weird warbling electric Veena player". She trained as a dentist and then appeared on The Voice in 2013, where she wowed the judges with her unique style of as a fusion of western pop and Indian classical music. She joins Anita to explain how she plays the electric Veena and to describe her performances with the orchestral Qawwalli Project, reviving old Sufi poems and putting their own spin on them musically with a western orchestral style. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Danielle Bennett Interviewed Guest: Laura Kennedy Interviewed Guest: Shirley Yanez Interviewed Guest: Chinaza Onyechi Interviewed Guest: Susan Ogilvy Interviewed Guest: Karen Ingala Smith Interviewed Guest: Abi Sampa ... Read more

08 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:23

08 Oct 2021


#287

Woman's Hour turns 75 today

Our specially commissioned poll to celebrate Woman’s Hour at 75 looks at women and equality in the UK today. It finds the place that women feel the most unequal is in the home, at work in terms of pay and benefits and in terms of safety due to their experience of sexual exploitation and abuse. Emma Barnett talks about the issues raised with our panel including the author Jeanette Winterson, the commentator Inaya Floarin Iman and the founder of the Everyday Sexism Project Laura Bates. Joan Diana Gayford nee Wilson joined the BBC as a talks producer shortly after the Second World War. Not long after a new programme hit the airwaves. 75 years later, to the day, you can hear Emma talking to Diana Gayford who was working on Woman’s Hour when it first came to air at 2pm on 7th October 1946. Brenda Hale, Baroness Hale of Richmond joins Emma on this anniversary programme. She is a former judge who served as the first female president of the Supreme Court. In 2019 she made headlines announcing the Supreme Court’s judgement that the prorogation of Parliament was ‘unlawful, void and of no effect’. She has written a book, Spider Woman, that spans her life and work. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore ... Read more

07 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:39

07 Oct 2021


#286

Mina Smallman, Pauline Campbell, FASD

Mina Smallman, the mother of Nicole Smallman and Bibaa Henry, the sisters who were murdered in a North London park last year, speaks to us about her grief and women's safety. She also talks about wanting to reach out to Sarah Everard’s mother because of the particular type of grief they share. She also reminds us of the type of people her daughters were. We get the latest from the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester with the BBC's Political Correspondent, Chris Mason. We hear from Pauline Campbell who's written a book called Rice and Peas and Fish and Chips. It's part social & political commentary, part memoir and explores what it means to be British. Pauline grew up in 1970s London as a first generation, immigrant child of Caribbean parents. She left school with virtually no qualifications after being told she wasn't clever enough for University. But at 23, when she was working as a housing benefits officer, she got a place at university to study law. Even though she was ‘black, old and a woman’ - her words - she kept going and qualified as a lawyer when she was 41. Now she's an award-winning local government lawyer. FASD stands for Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. They're a range of lifelong disabilities caused by a mother drinking alcohol during pregnancy. They include physical, mental, behavioural and learning problems. A new study by The University of Salford says that between 600 and 1,300 children across Greater Manchester may have developed the condition every year. Based on those figures, the National Organisation for FASD believes that 1.2 to 2.4 million people in the UK may have had FASD in 2020. So what are the reasons for this increase and why is FASD so often misdiagnosed? ... Read more

06 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:47

06 Oct 2021


#285

Anita Hill on her book Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence.

We hear from Professor Anita Hill who thirty years ago faced an all-male, all-white Senate Judiciary Committee—led by the then, Senator Joe Biden—to testify that her boss, Supreme Court Justice nominee Clarence Thomas, had sexually harassed her. It was a landmark moment for these issues and inspired countless women to come forward with their stories, to file complaints, and even to run for office; creating an unintentional trail blazer. Now an advocate, educator and author she talks to Emma Barnett about her new book Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence. Research suggests that talking to people we don't know can be good for us. Why don’t we do it more often? How has the pandemic impacted our desire to talk to people we don’t know? Dr Gillian Sandstrom, senior lecturer in psychology at the University of Essex, tells us the benefits of making small talk and gives us some tips on how to do it. How can we best discuss the issues of safety without making girls and young women terrified to leave the house? I am joined now by parenting expert, Sue Atkins and Lorraine Candy - mother of three daughters and author of 'Mum, What's Wrong with You?': 101 Things Only Mothers of Teenage Girls Know. Plus ahead tonight’s 2021 Gramophones, Awards, the classical music version of the Grammys which will be streaming live this evening we talk to Fatma Said. Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell Photo credit; Celeste Sloman ... Read more

05 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:45

05 Oct 2021


#284

Institutional Misogyny, Bullying in Parliament, Women Magicians

Is the Police institutionally misogynistic? It's the question that's been raised now that a police WhatsApp group has come to light which Wayne Couzens was part of. It contained offensive messages. We also know that another police officer called PC David Carrick has been charged with rape. Plus there have been reports of 26 Metropolitan police officers committing sex crimes since 2016. Janet Hills, who's just retired as the Chair of the Metropolitan Black Police Association joins us to discuss, and we go to the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester to speak to MP Laura Farris.  We hear from Jenny McCullough who used to work as a clerk in The House of Commons. It was her dream job but she made complaints about Keith Vaz who used to be the Chair of Home Affairs Select Committee. Feeling bullied and undermined, she eventually resigned from her job but a fortnight ago a House of Common's Independent Expert Panel upheld her complaints. She explains why that's significant, both personally and for the culture of Parliament. The Magic Circle appointed its first female president last week: the first in its 116 year history. But who are the women who paved the way? Academic and magician Dr Naomi Paxton shares the stories of female magicians throughout history and reflects on the challenges facing them today. ... Read more

04 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:40

04 Oct 2021


#283

Sarah Everard; Intergenerational friendships, 007 Lashana Lynch; 'Late life lesbians'. Married to an...

Zoe Billingham, one of the top inspectors at Her Majesty’s of Constabulary, and Dame Vera Baird, the Victims' Commissioner for England and Wales on the reaction to further details about Sarah Everard's murder and the subsequent life prison sentence handed down to the former Met Police officer Wayne Couzens. Intergenational friendships, how is it different from being friends with someone your own age? Best friends 60 year old Sue and 33 year old Emily discuss. The actor Lashana Lynch on making Bond history as the first black female 007 in 'No Time to Die'. The woman whose husband of 15 years became a covid conspiracy theorist. Flick Bayliss on her experience as a 'late life lesbian;, and writing lesbian erotica. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor ... Read more

02 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:22

02 Oct 2021


#282

Intergenerational friendships; Victims' Commissioner Vera Baird; Nikita Gill and Gnarly; Liz Fraser

Are you in an intergenerational friendship? Anita speaks to Emily who’s 33 and her best friend Sue who’s 60 about the unique benefits of friendships across the ages. The Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick has admitted that trust in the police force has been "shaken" by the murder of Sarah Everard. So where do we go from here? And what support is there for the bereaved families who have lost loved ones to male violence? Anita speaks to Dame Vera, the Victims' Commissioner for England and Wales. Irish Indian poet and writer, Nikita Gill and British Sri-Lankan producer and live performer Gnarly will appear together for two nights at the Southbank Centre in London tonight and next week. Poems written by Nikita are transformed into songs by Gnarly, merging traditional and digital art and creating, what they say is something no one has seen before. They join Anita in the studio for a chat and a bit of a performance. Writer and broadcaster Liz Fraser has written a memoir about being in a relationship with a man she loves, the father of her child who is also an alcoholic. For a time, she failed to realise how serious his addiction was and she also kept the often shocking truth of what was going on entirely to herself, trying in vain to help her partner find a path to sobriety. Finally she herself broke from the trauma and started to speak out. She joins Anita to talk about her experiences described in her book, Coming Clean: A true story of love, addiction and recovery. ... Read more

01 Oct 2021

57 MINS

57:58

01 Oct 2021


#281

Sarah Everard; Zoë Billingham, Her Majesty’s Inspector of Constabulary; Pepsi & Shirlie; The ethics ...

Sarah Everard's killer Wayne Couzens was sentenced today. The court heard that Sarah Everard was handcuffed by her murderer - a Metropolitan Police officer - as he pretended to arrest her for breaching Covid guidelines, as she walked home from a friend's house in Clapham on 3 March. Couzens showed his warrant card before restraining her and putting her in his hire car and driving away. Emma gets reaction from listener and journalist Kat Brown, and reads from Sarah's mother Susan Everard's victim impact statement. She also speaks to Zoë Billingham, who is standing down today after 12 years in her role at Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary. Zoë has taken a lead on domestic abuse inspections, and this month published a damning report into the way an ‘epidemic’ of violence against women and girls is being handled – and calling for the prevention of these crimes to be taken as seriously by police and Government as counterterrorism. The report was commissioned by the Home Secretary Priti Patel in the wake of Sarah Everard’s murder in March. After many years as members of Wham!, Pepsi & Shirlie broke out to conquer the charts as a pop duo. They discuss the challenges of making it in the male-dominated 1980s music industry, juggling pop careers with motherhood and reinventing themselves. Surrogacy in England and Wales has quadrupled over the past decade and enjoys a much higher profile thanks to celebrity parents such as Elton John, Kim Kardashian and Tom Daley. But despite it becoming an increasingly accepted option for those wishing to have a family, the laws regulating surrogacy and the rights of those involved haven't changed in the UK since the mid-1980s. The Law Commission is now in the process of reviewing those laws for the modern day. Bioethicist Dr Herjeet Marway from the University of Birmingham and lawyer Dr Claire Fenton-Glynn from the University of Cambridge discuss the many sticking points in surrogacy's evolving legal and ethical picture. Image credit: Family Handout/CPS/PA Wire. Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Editor: Karen Dalziel ... Read more

30 Sep 2021

58 MINS

58:03

30 Sep 2021