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The Intelligence from The Economist podcast

The Intelligence from The Economist

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

 

#701

Meeting them where they are: a British MP’s murder

Sir David Amess was killed doing what he loved: speaking directly with voters. We examine the dangers inherent in the “ [constituency surgeries] (https://www.economist.com/britain/2021/10/16/the-murder-of-sir-david-amess-will-change-the-nature-of-british-democracy?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) ” that British politicians cherish. The fight against tuberculosis is made harder by mutations that confer drug resistance; we look at [research] (https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/2021/10/19/most-resistance-causing-mutations-in-tb-have-now-been-identified?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) that has traced nearly every one of them. And why Andy Warhol is big in Iran, again. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

19 Oct 2021

20 MINS

20:46

19 Oct 2021


#700

Chinese draggin’: growth slows

A paltry GDP rise is down to the pandemic, power and property. We ask what growing pains President Xi Jinping will endure in the name of economic reforms. Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, will probably end up in the second round of next year’s election; who will stand against him is [ever more unpredictable] (https://www.economist.com/europe/eric-zemmour-the-anti-immigrant-radical-who-could-supplant-marine-le-pen/21805511?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . And fixing meeting inefficiency with [an 850-year-old idea] (https://www.economist.com/business/2021/10/16/how-to-run-better-meetings?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

18 Oct 2021

19 MINS

19:49

18 Oct 2021


#699

Port, and a storm: sectarian violence in Lebanon

The effort to [investigate] (https://www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/a-year-after-the-beirut-blast-still-no-bottom-to-lebanons-crisis/21803288?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) last year’s port explosion in Beirut has fired up political and religious tensions—resulting in Lebanon’s worst violence in years. We speak with Dmitry Muratov, a Russian journalist who shared this year’s Nobel peace prize, about what the award [means to him] (https://www.economist.com/international/2021/10/14/a-russian-editor-says-he-won-the-nobel-because-his-slain-colleagues-could-not?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) , and to press freedom. And why autocratic regimes like to [snap up] (https://www.economist.com/the-economist-explains/2021/10/08/why-do-authoritarian-regimes-like-to-buy-english-football-clubs?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) English football clubs. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

15 Oct 2021

23 MINS

23:22

15 Oct 2021


#698

For watt it’s worth: energy markets’ squeeze

A fossil-fuel scramble reveals energy markets in [desperate need] (https://www.economist.com/business/2021/10/16/dont-expect-big-oil-to-fix-the-energy-crunch?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) of a redesign. We examine what must be done to secure a renewable future. Throngs of Hong Kong residents fleeing China’s tightening hand are [settling in Britain] (https://www.economist.com/britain/2021/09/23/britains-newest-immigrant-group-is-unlike-any-that-came-before?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) ; our correspondent finds an immigrant group unlike any that came before. And the boom in [“femtech” entrepreneurs] (https://espresso.economist.com/1b984659debd729d742b0035a987f069?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) at last focusing on women’s health. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

14 Oct 2021

22 MINS

22:52

14 Oct 2021


#697

Keep your friends close: Pakistan’s shifting role

As the Taliban’s closest ally, the country bears a big responsibility for Afghanistan’s fate. We examine its diplomatic [risks and opportunities] (https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/10/07/pakistan-got-its-way-in-afghanistan-now-what?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . Mastercard is pressing porn purveyors this week; we look at how financial companies are reluctantly [stepping up] (https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/credit-card-firms-are-becoming-reluctant-regulators-of-the-web/21805450?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) as the internet’s police. And a timely social-inequality take drives South Korea’s “ [Squid Game] (https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/10/09/south-koreans-are-bemused-by-the-global-success-of-squid-game?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) ” to the top of Netflix's charts worldwide. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

13 Oct 2021

21 MINS

21:01

13 Oct 2021


#696

Exit Poles? A bold challenge to the EU

After a court ruling in Poland that is [an affront] (https://www.economist.com/europe/2021/10/10/governments-fall-as-the-eu-battles-corruption?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) to a core European Union principle, Poles hit the streets—fearing a “Pol-exit” they do not want. Who will back down? Hydrogen has been touted for decades as a fuel with green credentials. At last its time [has come] (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2021/10/09/hydrogens-moment-is-here-at-last?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . And the [herd of unicorns] (https://www.economist.com/business/2021/10/09/mexico-is-finally-seeing-a-startup-bonanza?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) popping up in Mexico. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

12 Oct 2021

20 MINS

20:01

12 Oct 2021


#695

Zero-to-some game: Asia-Pacific covid-19 plans crack

Where governments enacted zero-tolerance coronavirus strategies, numbers indeed stayed low. That was before the Delta variant. We ask how countries can now [wind back] (https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/10/09/asian-countries-are-at-last-abandoning-zero-covid-strategies?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) those policies. A [shocking report] (https://www.economist.com/europe/2021/10/09/the-french-catholic-church-acknowledges-a-staggering-pattern-of-sexual-abuse?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) of sexual abuse within France’s Catholic church further threatens the institution’s connection with society. And countering the notion that the “ [standard English] (https://www.economist.com/books-and-arts/2021/10/02/dont-ditch-standard-english-teach-it-better?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) ” taught the world over is the only proper one. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

11 Oct 2021

21 MINS

21:15

11 Oct 2021


#694

Strait of tension: Chinese jets test Taiwan

China has sent more than 100 planes to probe Taiwan’s air-defence zone. We explain why Beijing has chosen this moment to send a message across the strait. The WHO has approved a vaccine against malaria—a turning-point in fighting a disease that kills 260,000 African children a year. And if you want a Nobel prize, it helps to be lauded by a laureate. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

08 Oct 2021

22 MINS

22:05

08 Oct 2021


#693

How to lose friends and alienate people: Ethiopia’s civil war

Abiy Ahmed is sworn in again as prime minister, even as continuing strife increases the country’s isolation. Our correspondent witnesses the gruesome aftermath of a telling battle. China once encouraged, even forced abortions. Now, as it frets about declining birth rates, it’s discouraging them. And we report on India’s “godmen” and “godwomen”, their moneyspinning schemes and their fanatical followers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

07 Oct 2021

20 MINS

20:00

07 Oct 2021


#692

Ticker shock: London’s wheezing stockmarket

A global financial centre must move with the times, and—so far—London has not. Our correspondent lays out the causes of the malaise, and [how to fix it] (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2021/10/02/how-to-revive-britains-stockmarket?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . For many years compulsory military service was on the decline; we ask why so many countries are [bringing it back] (https://www.economist.com/international/2021/10/02/the-military-draft-is-making-a-comeback?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . And why Europe is the destination for a growing class of [digital nomads] (https://www.economist.com/europe/2021/10/02/why-europe-is-a-great-place-for-digital-nomads?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

06 Oct 2021

23 MINS

23:34

06 Oct 2021


#691

When it goes dark: Facebook’s terrible week

Yesterday’s global outage is not even the worst of it: today’s congressional testimony will examine a whistleblower’s [allegations] (https://espresso.economist.com/4f372ad0cb173caf4691d83696b3b08a?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) that the company knows its products cause widespread harm. The modern food-industrial complex is great for eaters but appalling for the planet; we examine technological [fixes] (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2021/10/02/new-ways-to-make-food-are-coming-but-will-consumers-bite?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) , and whether consumers will bite. And how Afghanistan's embassies abroad are— [or aren’t] (https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/10/02/afghan-embassies-dont-recognise-the-taliban?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) —dealing with the Taliban. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

05 Oct 2021

21 MINS

21:05

05 Oct 2021


#690

Docket launch: a new term for America’s Supreme Court

The court will be [tackling] (https://www.economist.com/united-states/2021/10/02/the-new-supreme-court-term-is-about-to-begin?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) just about every judicial and social flashpoint in the country during the term that starts today; our correspondent lays out the considerable stakes. A vast and costly die-off of Britain’s trees could have been averted simply and cheaply: just let them stay put. And why hotels are such [ideal backdrops] (https://www.economist.com/books-and-arts/2021/09/24/why-do-hotels-make-for-such-good-drama?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) for filmmakers and scriptwriters. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

04 Oct 2021

21 MINS

21:54

04 Oct 2021


#689

The courage of two convictions: Nicolas Sarkozy

The [first conviction] (https://www.economist.com/europe/2021/03/01/nicolas-sarkozys-jail-sentence-shocks-frances-political-class?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) of France’s former president shocked the nation; the second confirms for citizens that, these days, politicians will be held to account. Our correspondent meets a Burmese hipster who, after this year’s military coup, has become a somewhat conflicted [freedom fighter] (https://www.economist.com/1843/2021/09/27/killing-informants-is-cool-how-a-myanmar-hipster-became-a-guerrilla-fighter?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . And the record label whose name you may never have heard but whose music you [certainly have] (https://www.economist.com/books-and-arts/2021/09/22/kpm-music-is-one-of-the-most-important-record-labels-in-history?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

01 Oct 2021

21 MINS

21:09

01 Oct 2021


#688

Nobody’s fuel: Britain’s shortages

From chicken to petrol, Britons are facing [long queues and bare shelves] (https://www.economist.com/britain/boris-johnson-dodges-the-blame-for-britains-petrol-pump-nightmare/21805106?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . We ask about the multifarious reasons behind the shortfalls, and how long they will last. Tunisia’s democracy has been looking shaky [for months] (https://www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2021/07/26/tunisias-democracy-totters-as-the-president-suspends-parliament?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) ; we examine what may change with yesterday’s appointment of its first-ever female prime minister. And India’s beleaguered unmarried couples at last are getting [some privacy] (https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/09/23/love-hotels-are-blossoming-in-india?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

30 Sep 2021

23 MINS

23:06

30 Sep 2021


#687

Suga-free Diet: Japan’s next leader

The ruling party’s choice for its president—a shoo-in for prime minister—seems to overlook the people’s will. We ask how Kishida Fumio is likely to lead, and for how long. Some of Nigeria’s megachurches are larger than stadiums, and have considerable assets—as do many of their charismatic pastors. And keeping up with demand for vinyl records presents pressing problems. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

29 Sep 2021

19 MINS

19:13

29 Sep 2021


#686

A run for its money: funding crunches in Congress

America’s crash of deadlines carries risks for the government’s budget and just possibly its [sovereign debt] (https://www.economist.com/the-economist-explains/2021/09/21/what-is-americas-debt-ceiling?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) , and threatens Joe Biden’s presidency-defining social-spending reforms. We ask what happens next. South Korea’s government is ostensibly cracking down on fake news; in practice it may be [hobbling real journalism] (https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/09/23/south-koreas-plan-to-fight-fake-news-could-hobble-real-journalism?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . And the hopeful view provided by a French conceptual artist’s [latest work] (https://www.economist.com/books-and-arts/2021/09/25/a-bold-artists-work-is-at-once-high-tech-and-primeval?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

28 Sep 2021

21 MINS

21:50

28 Sep 2021


#685

Colour schemes: Germany’s coming coalition

The country heads for a three-party government after a [nail-biting election] (https://www.economist.com/europe/2021/09/26/after-a-tight-election-olaf-scholzs-social-democrats-come-out-just-in-front?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . We cut through the flurry of letters and colours to ask what is likely to happen next. The technology swiftly deployed to combat the coronavirus may also crack a four-decade-old problem: [vaccinating against HIV] (https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/a-new-aids-vaccine-heads-to-clinical-trials/21804378?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . And evidence that the mighty Tyrannosaurus Rex may have liked a love bite. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

27 Sep 2021

19 MINS

19:34

27 Sep 2021


#684

Clubs seal: China’s view as alliances multiply

Leaders of “the Quad” are meeting in person for the first time; drama from the AUKUS alliance still simmers. Our Beijing bureau chief discusses how Chinese officials [see] (https://www.economist.com/china/2021/09/25/china-believes-that-america-is-forging-alliances-to-stop-its-rise?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) all these club ties. As Chancellor Angela Merkel’s time in office wanes, we assess Germany’s [many challenges] (https://www.economist.com/leaders/2021/09/25/the-mess-merkel-leaves-behind?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) she leaves behind. And the sweet, sweet [history of baklava] (https://www.economist.com/1843/2021/09/15/go-nuts-the-multilayered-history-of-baklava?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) , a Middle Eastern treat gone global. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

24 Sep 2021

23 MINS

23:19

24 Sep 2021


#683

Same assembly, rewired: the United Nations meets

The annual United Nations General Assembly is more than just worthy pledges and fancy dinners; we ask where the tensions and the opportunities lie [this time around] (https://espresso.economist.com/70431822025c237eddc9145838fc7046?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . Last year’s fears of a crippling “twindemic” of covid-19 and influenza proved unfounded—and that provides more [reason to worry] (https://www.economist.com/international/measures-to-prevent-the-spread-of-covid-19-have-also-fended-off-flu/21804978?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) this year. And why “like” is, like, [really useful] (https://www.economist.com/books-and-arts/2021/09/18/if-you-like-dislike-like-maybe-like-think-again?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

23 Sep 2021

22 MINS

22:14

23 Sep 2021


#682

The homes stretch: Evergrande

China’s property behemoth has slammed up against new rules on its giant debt pile. We ask what [wider risks] (https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2021/09/21/what-are-the-systemic-risks-of-an-evergrande-collapse?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) it now poses as a cash crunch bites. Britain has begun a demographic trend unusual in the rich world: its share of young people is [spiking] (https://www.economist.com/britain/2021/08/21/the-number-of-young-adults-in-britain-is-about-to-rise-sharply?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) —and will be for a decade. And what the pandemic has done for the [future of office-wear] (https://www.economist.com/business/2021/09/11/the-pandemic-has-refashioned-corporate-dress-codes?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

22 Sep 2021

19 MINS

19:03

22 Sep 2021


#681

Running to stand still: Canada’s election

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau remains in power after Monday’s election, but he emerges without the majority he wanted, and with his soft power damaged. He now faces a fourth wave of the pandemic and an emboldened far-right from a weaker position. Child labour fell markedly in the 16 years after the turn of the millennium. Now it’s [on the rise again] (https://www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2021/09/18/why-the-number-of-children-working-is-rising?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . Efforts to prevent children from working can often exacerbate the problem. And we consider one of the more unusual ideas for combating climate change: [potty-training cows] (https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/how-to-toilet-train-your-cow/21804770?utm_campaign=the-intelligence&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_source=third-party-host&amp;utm_content=show-notes) . For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here [www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer] (http://www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer) &#10; See <a style='color: grey; ' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

21 Sep 2021

20 MINS

20:01

21 Sep 2021