Featured

Free podcast player

Limited Time Offer

 

Loading…

The Documentary Podcast podcast

The Documentary Podcast

Download the latest documentaries investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Download the latest documentaries investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

 

#300

Hunting the darknet dealers

The high stakes cat and mouse game between police and darknet drug dealers. Police in the UK say they are finally turning the tide on drug dealers selling on the darknet – a secretive part of the internet which has been described as like “online shopping for drugs.” The UK’s National Crime Agency says recent international takedowns of so called dark markets and arrests in multiple countries are a result of new techniques in cyber policing that is giving them the upper hand. However, BBC research suggests that police around the world have an uphill struggle on their hands as many dealers - known as vendors - have survived multiple market place collapses by operating across many different darknet sites. The programme explores the major role played by UK dealers in the global business which is estimated to be worth more than a billion dollars a year. The BBC’s cyber reporter Joe Tidy and BBC data journalist Alison Benjamin journey into this hidden world to speak to vendors and buyers and uncover secrets of the trade. Reporter: Joe Tidy Producer: Paul Grant Editor: Maggie Latham (Image: An ecstasy pill bought on the darknet, being tested at a lab in the UK. Credit: BBC) ... Read more

27 Jan 2022

27 MINS

27:21

27 Jan 2022


#299

Fighting tobacco in Zambia

In Zambia, smoking is on the rise. One woman wants to change that. BBC global health correspondent Tulip Mazumdar follows the story of Brenda Chitindi in her efforts to get tobacco control on the agenda. As tobacco production and consumption increase in Zambia, Brenda and others are campaigning for the introduction of a Tobacco Control Bill to the nation's legislature. It is a campaign they have been fighting for over a decade. With a new government elected in 2021, could this be the moment for change? ... Read more

25 Jan 2022

27 MINS

27:30

25 Jan 2022


#298

Women Building Peace: Afghanistan

"Lama", a student in Afghanistan who fears for her safety since the Taliban takeover, speaks to the country's former education minister Rangina Hamidi, who fled to the United States, and to former US Secretary of State and campaigner for women's rights Hillary Clinton. A co-production by BBC and Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security Presenter: Suzanne Kianpour Produced by Philip Reevell for BBC World Service ... Read more

23 Jan 2022

23 MINS

23:56

23 Jan 2022


#297

Music that survived the Nazis: Part one

There is a common misconception that music under the Nazis was either ‘Degenerate Music’ to be suppressed or propaganda music that was officially sanctioned. Historian Shirli Gilbert shows that there was a wealth of different music-making during this period, including secret sessions by Jewish musicians and others, that managed to evade official scrutiny. In this first episode, she explores the music of the Jewish Culture League, as well as the work of Lukraphon and Semer, two Jewish record labels active at this time. ... Read more

22 Jan 2022

50 MINS

50:34

22 Jan 2022


#296

Coronavirus: Family arguments

Health professionals will tell you that Covid-19 vaccines have saved millions of lives across the globe yet some people continue to doubt their safety and refuse to get a jab. These differences of opinion are being played out within families: some refuse to get a jab, while others are vaccinated. An American in Florida and a French citizen in Ireland share the difficulties they have encountered at home with host James Reynolds. We bring them together to hear how family gatherings can become fraught. ... Read more

22 Jan 2022

23 MINS

23:57

22 Jan 2022


#295

China's Zero-Covid Dilemma

As coronavirus restrictions begin to ease around the world, China is sticking with its Zero-Covid policy. But questions have been raised about how sustainable the strategy is, and how much longer China can keep the virus out. Ros Atkins looks at the dilemma this has created for the country and its leadership. ... Read more

22 Jan 2022

09 MINS

09:58

22 Jan 2022


#294

Feeling used

When we feel taken advantage of by people, it can be very hurtful and leave us feeling bitter. Giving a lot to our friends can come with the expectation that the same is offered in return. This is the experience of Jacob, from India. He speaks to Sister Dang Nghiem who suggests that through giving to ourselves and developing self-love, we find we need less appreciation from others. ... Read more

22 Jan 2022

18 MINS

18:29

22 Jan 2022


#293

Hunting Syria's war criminals

Imagine walking down a street in a European capital and meeting your torturer. For many Syrian refugees fleeing war and human rights abuses, Europe was meant to be a sanctuary. So it was a shock when people began bumping into their torturers out shopping or in a cafe. In fact many of those involved in the Syrian government’s notorious interrogation facilities are hiding in plain sight in European cities having used the refugee wave as a “ratline” out of the country. More and more are now being investigated, arrested and put on trial in European courts. But with President Assad firmly in control in Syria the long arm of the state is reaching those willing to testify. For Assignment, Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl look at how the Syrian war is continuing to play out in Europe. Presented and produced by Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl Editor: Bridget Harney (Image: A woman shows a picture of her Syrian relatives outside the Higher Regional Court in Koblenz, Germany, 13 January 2022. Credit: EPA/Sascha Steinbach) ... Read more

20 Jan 2022

27 MINS

27:20

20 Jan 2022


#292

Silence would be treason

The last writings of Ken Saro-Wiwa from prison in Nigeria to an Irish nun in the run up to his execution in November 1995. Smuggled out of prison in bread baskets, they are the final testament of a man who gave everything he had in the struggle for social and ecological justice. As Ken Saro-Wiwa continues to inspire people and movements across decades and continents, these letters form part of our living history, and give us an immediate link with the man behind the hero. ... Read more

15 Jan 2022

50 MINS

50:08

15 Jan 2022


#291

Coronavirus: Athletes and teachers

The vaccination and visa controversy around Novak Djokovic at the Australian Open tournament has made global headlines all week. It has also put focus on how sports around the world deal with vaccines in this pandemic. Professional athletes often follow a rigorous diet and training schedule to achieve optimum fitness. Not surprisingly, athletes care about what they put in their bodies and in some cases they are delaying or avoiding getting a jab against Covid-19. To discuss how this is playing out in different sports, host James Reynolds brings together an American professional basketball player, currently competing in Istanbul, a sports physician in Mumbai, India and a sports writer in the US. They discuss how the stance of the men's world number one tennis player and other sports stars is having an impact and what might be done to offer reassurance around Covid vaccines. ... Read more

15 Jan 2022

23 MINS

23:55

15 Jan 2022


#290

Djokovic, sport and vaccine mandates

The Covid vaccination status of men's number one tennis player, Novak Djokovic, has caused a political row. Ros Atkins looks at what Djokovic's case could mean for vaccination in sport. ... Read more

15 Jan 2022

09 MINS

09:52

15 Jan 2022


#289

World of Wisdom: Being your true self

Being the real you can be difficult, especially if it means upsetting your family. Folake from Benin tries to be a ‘good girl’ and avoids taking decisions her family would not approve of, but she wants to listen to her heart. She speaks with Dr Shefali, an Indian-born clinical psychologist – now based in New York. She is the author of A Radical Awakening, which aims to lay out a path for women to discover their inner truth. ... Read more

15 Jan 2022

18 MINS

18:27

15 Jan 2022


#288

Montenegro’s Chinese road

It’s been called the priciest piece of tarmac in the world. In 2014 the government of Montenegro signed a contract with a state-owned Chinese company to build part of a 170 kilometre-long highway – a road that would connect its main port with the Serbian border to the north. The price-tag on the first 42 kilometres of asphalt was a staggering $1 billion - most of which has been borrowed from a Chinese bank. In Montenegro, questions continue to be asked about why the project went ahead when some experts said that it was not viable. The River Tara – a UNESCO protected site – has been impacted by the building works, and allegations of corruption and kickbacks have hung around like a bad smell. Meanwhile, the economy has taken a massive hit as a result of the pandemic, and some Montenegrins worry about the country's ability to repay the loan. Worse still, a clause in the road contract states that Montenegro may relinquish sovereignty over unspecified parts of its territory if there is a default. But is everything as it seems? Assignment investigates. Presenter: Linda Pressly Producer: Mike Gallagher Editor: Bridget Harney (Image: A slogan for Chinese construction workers adorns part of Montenegro’s new mountain road. Credit: BBC/Michael Gallagher) ... Read more

13 Jan 2022

27 MINS

27:32

13 Jan 2022


#287

Forest fear

The Amazon is the largest area of rainforest on earth. Bursting with life, it provides us with a wealth of resources. But for each of its potential riches a potential threat is lurking beneath the canopy. Increasing deforestation allows what is hidden within to find a way out, and with it the possibility for wildlife to spread deadly pathogens. ... Read more

08 Jan 2022

49 MINS

49:57

08 Jan 2022


#286

Coronavirus: The vaccinators

The rapid spread of the Omicron variant of Covid-19 is leading to record infection levels in several countries, and vaccination is a key part of the fight against the pandemic. Host James Reynolds brings together vaccination workers in South Africa, Australia, the United States and the UK to share what’s it like to be part of the global effort to vaccinate. We also hear from two people in the US and the UK who turned down a vaccination. After almost dying, they regret their decisions. “I had no idea what was going into me when they [health workers] were saving my life - the same as I don’t know what’s in the vaccine,” says Jade in the UK. “It’s silly isn’t it? You kind of overthink one thing but not the other.” ... Read more

08 Jan 2022

24 MINS

24:01

08 Jan 2022


#285

The storming of the US Capitol: what happened next

The US Capitol riot on January 6, 2021 has been described by President Biden as a dark day in US history. A year on since the attack, Ros Atkins examines the legal and political fall-out from it. ... Read more

08 Jan 2022

10 MINS

10:01

08 Jan 2022


#284

World of Wisdom: Precious time in later life

It can be hard to choose how to spend our precious time. Imam Jamal Rahman, a Sufi spiritual teacher, offers a joyful perspective to Rebecca from the USA. ... Read more

08 Jan 2022

18 MINS

18:32

08 Jan 2022


#283

Turkey's crazy project

A giant new canal for the world’s biggest ships is the most ambitious engineering plan yet proposed by Turkey’s President Erdogan, whose massive infrastructure projects have already changed the face of his country. The proposed waterway would slice through Istanbul, creating in effect a second Bosphorus, the busy shipping lane that is now the only outlet from the Black Sea. The president himself has called the project “crazy”. But he says it would “save the future of Istanbul”, easing traffic in the Bosphorus and reducing the risk of a terrible accident there. But the plan has met a storm of opposition. Istanbul’s mayor says it would “murder” the historic city. Critics claim the canal would be an environmental disaster, cost billions of dollars that Turkey can’t afford – and provoke severe tensions with Russia, which is determined to preserve existing rules on traffic into and out of the Black Sea. Will the canal go ahead? Who would lose – and who would benefit? Tim Whewell reports from a divided Istanbul. (Image: Turkish coastal safety patrol boats in the Bosphorus, Istanbul. Credit: Yörük Işık) ... Read more

06 Jan 2022

27 MINS

27:51

06 Jan 2022


#282

Gone but not forgotten: Syria's missing persons

Wafa Mustafa hasn't heard from her dad since he went missing in July 2013. She, like tens of thousands of others in her position, believes he is being detained by the Syrian government, and is searching for him. In this documentary, she explains how she uses the story of his life to campaign for justice in Syria, and how keeping the memory of her father alive is an act of protest and resistance. ... Read more

04 Jan 2022

27 MINS

27:33

04 Jan 2022


#281

Generation Change: Equality in science and technology

Megha Mohan talks to young people working to diversify science, technology, engineering and maths - fields that will be crucial to the future of our planet, but whose workforces remain predominantly male. She also hears how Nobel Prize-winning astronomer Andrea Ghez overcame gender barriers in her career in science. Generation Change is a co-production of the BBC and Nobel Prize Outreach ... Read more

04 Jan 2022

27 MINS

27:22

04 Jan 2022