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The Daily podcast

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

 

#1432

Biden Gets a Supreme Court Pick

On Wednesday, it was revealed that Justice Stephen Breyer, the senior member of the Supreme Court’s liberal wing, will retire from the bench.  Democrats, and many on the left, will have breathed a sigh of relief. His decision has given President Biden the chance to nominate a successor while Democrats control the Senate.  We take a look at the legacy of Justice Breyer’s time on the court, why he chose to retire now and how President Biden might decide on his successor.  Guest: [Adam Liptak] (https://www.nytimes.com/by/adam-liptak?smid=pc-thedaily) , a Supreme Court reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---Justice Breyer has announced that [he will retire from the Supreme Court bench] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/26/us/stephen-breyer-retire-supreme-court.html?smid=pc-thedaily) upon the confirmation of his successor. ---President Joe Biden and his legal team have spent a year preparing for this moment: the chance to make good on his pledge [to name the first Black woman to the Supreme Court] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/26/us/politics/supreme-court-nominee-black-woman.html?smid=pc-thedaily) .  For more information on today’s episode, visit  [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. ... Read more

27 Jan 2022

26 MINS

26:29

27 Jan 2022


#1431

We Need to Talk About Covid, Part 1

It appears that the United States may be at a turning point in the pandemic. The contagiousness of the Omicron variant has many people resigned to the fact that they probably will be infected; this variant is, relative to its predecessors and in most cases, milder; and there is universal vaccine access for those old enough to receive a shot.  So, The Times commissioned a poll of 4,400 Americans to discover how they are thinking about the pandemic and gauge how, and when, we might pivot to living with the virus.  We explore the results of this poll — and the divides in opinion by age, vaccination status and politics.  Guest: [David Leonhardt] (https://www.nytimes.com/by/david-leonhardt?smid=pc-thedaily) , a senior writer for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---The two Covid Americas: You can read [ David Leonhardt’s analysis] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/25/briefing/covid-behavior-vaccinated-unvaccinated.html?smid=pc-thedaily) of a poll about attitudes toward the pandemic here.  For more information on today’s episode, visit  [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. ... Read more

26 Jan 2022

26 MINS

26:31

26 Jan 2022


#1430

How Partying Could Be Boris Johnson’s Undoing

When allegations first emerged in November about parties held at 10 Downing Street, the residence and offices of the British prime minister, during a strict Covid lockdown, Prime Minister Boris Johnson waved them away.  Yet in the weeks since, the scandal has only grown, with public outrage building as more instances and details of lockdown parties at Downing Street have emerged. Some voters in Britain have long been willing to overlook the foibles of Mr. Johnson’s character, but this is a scandal that poses an existential threat to his leadership.  Guest: [Mark Landler] (https://www.nytimes.com/by/mark-landler?smid=pc-thedaily) , the London bureau chief for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---Boris Johnson’s future is in doubt after two humiliating apologies about parties while the country was under Covid restrictions. Here’s a guide to [ how he could be forced out, or fight on] (https://www.nytimes.com/article/boris-johnson-prime-minister-explained.html?smid=pc-thedaily) . ---Mr. Johnson, long famed for brushing off accusations of distortion or outright lying that seemed to only bolster his image as an incorrigible scamp, [ suddenly faces potential political death] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/22/world/europe/coronavirus-boris-johnson-novak-djokovic-hypocrisy.html?smid=pc-thedaily) over the very charge to which he had seemed immune. For more information on today’s episode, visit  [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. ... Read more

25 Jan 2022

25 MINS

25:04

25 Jan 2022


#1429

Documenting a Death by Euthanasia

This episode contains strong language.  Marieke Vervoort was a champion Paralympic athlete from Belgium. In 2016, Vervoort, who had a progressive disease, announced her retirement from professional sports and spoke of her desire to undergo euthanasia. Today, we hear Vervoort’s story from Lynsey Addario, a photojournalist who documented the end of her life. “In most of my experiences covering Iraq and Afghanistan and Democratic Republic of Congo and Darfur, I’m photographing people who are trying not to die,” Lynsey said. “Marieke was the first person I had really met who wanted to die.” Guest: [Lynsey Addario] (https://www.nytimes.com/by/lynsey-addario?smid=pc-thedaily) , a photojournalist who spent three years with Marieke Vervoort. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---Knowing she had the [legal right to die helped Marieke Vervoort live] (https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/12/05/sports/euthanasia-athlete.html?smid=pc-thedaily) her life. It propelled her to medals at the Paralympics. But she could never get away from the pain. ---Lynsey Addario spent nearly three years photographing Vervoort as she prepared to die by choice. It became one of the [most emotional assignments — and friendships — of her life] (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/06/reader-center/marieke-vervoort-euthanasia.html?smid=pc-thedaily) . For more information on today’s episode, visit  [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. ... Read more

24 Jan 2022

36 MINS

36:42

24 Jan 2022


#1428

The Sunday Read: ‘How Disgust Explains Everything’

What is “disgust”? Molly Young, a journalist with The New York Times, considers the evolutionary and social uses of this “universal aspect of life” to identify the impact of disgust in its physical, psychological and linguistic manifestations. Young explains the different forms of disgust, analyzing how the reactions they elicit play out in the body and mind, and why it is in many ways cultural. She explains how disgust shapes our behavior, technology, relationships and even political leanings. It’s behind everyday purity rites; the reason we use toilet paper, wash our hands and hold cutlery; it has shadowed the rules that have governed emotion in every culture throughout time. Charles Darwin, the scholar William Ian Miller, the research psychologist Paul Rozin and the philosopher Aurel Kolnai, among the many others who felt compelled, Young explained, to investigate this most primal emotion. This story was written by Molly Young and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, [download Audm for iPhone or Android] (https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=grossed_out_young) . ... Read more

23 Jan 2022

41 MINS

41:12

23 Jan 2022


#1427

What the ‘Djokovic Affair’ Revealed About Australia

Novak Djokovic, the world No. 1 player in men’s tennis, had a lot at stake going into this year’s Australian Open. A win there would have made him the most decorated male tennis player in history.  But he arrived in the country without having had a Covid-19 vaccination, flying in the face of Australia’s rules, and after a court battle he was ultimately deported. In Australia, the “Djokovic affair” has become about a lot more than athletes and vaccines — it has prompted conversations about the country’s aggressive border policy, isolationism and treatment of migrants.  Guest: [Damien Cave] (https://www.nytimes.com/by/damien-cave?smid=pc-thedaily) , the Australia bureau chief for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---Prime Minister Scott Morrison latched on to the Djokovic case. But with an election looming, [it’s not clear that it was a political winner] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/11/world/australia/novak-djokovic-australia-border-scott-morrison.html?smid=pc-thedaily) . ---Novak Djokovic [lost his bid to stay in Australia] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/16/world/australia/djokovic-deported.html?smid=pc-thedaily) to a government determined to make him a symbol of unvaccinated celebrity entitlement; to an immigration law that gives godlike authority to border enforcement; and to a public outcry, in a nation of rule followers. For more information on today’s episode, visit [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. ... Read more

21 Jan 2022

31 MINS

31:10

21 Jan 2022


#1426

Microsoft and the Metaverse

Microsoft announced this week that it was acquiring Activision Blizzard, the maker of video games such as Call of Duty and Candy Crush, in a deal valued at nearly $70 billion. Microsoft, the owner of Xbox, said the acquisition was a step toward gaining a foothold in the metaverse. But what exactly is the metaverse? And why are some of the biggest companies in the world spending billions of dollars to get involved? Guest: [Kevin Roose] (https://www.nytimes.com/by/kevin-roose?smid=pc-thedaily) , a technology columnist for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---Does the metaverse even exist? [ Here’s what you need to know] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/18/technology/personaltech/metaverse-gaming-definition.html) . ---Video games are not merely entertainment anymore. They have become weapons that today’s technology titans wield to [ try to shape our future] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/18/technology/microsoft-activision-metaverse.html) . ---The deal for Activision Blizzard would be Microsoft’s biggest ever, and one that places a major bet that people will be [ spending more and more time in the digital world] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/18/business/microsoft-activision-blizzard.html) . For more information on today’s episode, visit [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.  ... Read more

20 Jan 2022

23 MINS

23:02

20 Jan 2022


#1425

A Last-Gasp Push on Voting Rights

It’s a big week in the Senate for voting rights. Democrats have two bills that include measures to bolster and protect elections. But the bills are almost certain to fail. Why has it proved almost impossible to pass legislation so integral to the agenda of President Biden and the Democrats? Guest: [Astead W. Herndon] (https://www.nytimes.com/by/astead-w-herndon?smid=pc-thedaily) , a national political reporter for The New York Times. [Sign up here] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/signup/NTTD?smid=pc-thedaily) to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---Here’s what to know about [ voting rights and the battle over elections] (https://www.nytimes.com/article/voting-rights-tracker.html?name=styln-voting-rights&region=TOP_BANNER&block=storyline_menu_recirc&action=click&pgtype=Article&variant=1_BlueLink&is_new=false) . ---Democrats’ bid to force through a bill intended to offset state voting restrictions appeared [ destined to fall to a Republican filibuster] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/18/us/politics/senate-voting-rights-debate.html) . For more information on today’s episode, visit  [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. ... Read more

19 Jan 2022

31 MINS

31:30

19 Jan 2022


#1424

The Civilian Casualties of America’s Air Wars

Four years ago, Azmat Khan, an investigative reporter for The Times Magazine, told us [ the story of Basim Razzo] (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/17/podcasts/the-daily/airstrikes-isis-iraq-civilians.html) , whose entire family was killed in a U.S.-led airstrike in Iraq. His story helped reveal how American air wars were resulting in a staggering number of civilian deaths. Analyzing thousands of pages of U.S. military reports and investigating in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, Azmat was able to gain a better understanding of why this was happening. Azmat Khan, an investigative reporter for The Times Magazine. [Sign up here] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/signup/NTTD?smid=pc-thedaily) to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---The promise was a war waged by all-seeing drones and precision bombs. But Pentagon documents show [ flawed intelligence, faulty targeting, years of civilian deaths] (https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/12/18/us/airstrikes-pentagon-records-civilian-deaths.html) — and scant accountability. ---A trove of internal documents, combined with extensive reporting across the Middle East, reveals [ the tragic, disastrous failures] (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/19/magazine/victims-airstrikes-middle-east-civilians.html) of the U.S. military’s long-distance approach to warfare. For more information on today’s episode, visit  [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. ... Read more

18 Jan 2022

36 MINS

36:33

18 Jan 2022


#1423

The Sunday Read: ‘This Isn’t the California I Married’

Elizabeth Weil, the author of today’s Sunday Read, writes that, in her marriage, there was a silent third spouse: California. “The state was dramatic and a handful,” Weil writes. “But she was gorgeous, and she brought into our lives, through the natural world, all the treasure and magic we’d need.” However, for Weil, there is internal conflict living in a state where wildfires have become the norm. She describes living through a discontinuity in which previously held logic fails to stand up to reality. Today, Weil analyzes the sources of California’s crisis — from the impact of colonization and the systemic erasure of Indigenous practices to the significant loss of fire-management practices and critical dryness caused by global warming. In California, as in much of the world, climate anxiety and climate futurism coalesce into trans-apocalyptic pessimism. But, in spite of the doom, Weil suggests the situation is not completely devoid of hope. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, [download Audm for iPhone or Android] (https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=forever_fire_weil) . ... Read more

16 Jan 2022

46 MINS

46:40

16 Jan 2022


#1422

The Life and Legacy of Sidney Poitier

Sidney Poitier, who was Hollywood’s first Black matinee idol and who helped open the door for Black actors in the film industry, died last week. He was 94. For Wesley Morris, a Times culture critic, it is Mr. Poitier — not John Wayne, Cary Grant or Marilyn Monroe — who is the greatest American movie star. “His legacy is so much wider and deeper than the art itself,” Wesley said. “This man has managed to affect what we see, how we relate to people, who we think we are, who we should aspire to be. And if that’s not a sign of greatness, I don’t know what is.” Guest: [Wesley Morris] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/07/movies/sidney-poitier-legacy.html?smid=pc-thedaily) , a critic at large for The New York Times. [Sign up here] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/signup/NTTD?smid=pc-thedaily) to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---“The greatest American movie star is Sidney Poitier. You mean the greatest Black movie star? I don’t. Am I being controversial? Confrontational? Contrarian? No. I’m simply telling the truth.” [ Read Wesley’s tribute to Mr. Poitier] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/07/movies/sidney-poitier-legacy.html?smid=pc-thedaily) . ---Sidney Poitier, who paved the way for Black actors in film, [ died last week at 94] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/07/movies/sidney-poitier-dead.html?smid=pc-thedaily) .  For more information on today’s episode, visit [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.  ... Read more

14 Jan 2022

39 MINS

39:15

14 Jan 2022


#1421

‘The Kids Are Casualties in a War’

As the highly infectious Omicron variant surged, a high-stakes battle played out between Mayor Lori Lightfoot of Chicago and the city’s teachers’ union about how to keep schools open and safe. We chart this battle on the ground in Chicago, speaking with teachers, parents and students about the standoff. [Sign up here] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/signup/NTTD?smid=pc-thedaily) to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, [subscribe to our newsletter] (https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline) .  Background reading:  ---The deal between the city and the teachers’ union included [ provisions for additional testing and metrics] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/10/us/chicago-schools-reopen-covid.html) that would close schools with major virus outbreaks ---As millions of U.S. students headed back to their desks, the coronavirus testing that was supposed to help keep classrooms open safely was itself being tested. In much of the country, [ things are not going well] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/11/us/schools-covid-testing.html) . For more information on today’s episode, visit  [nytimes.com/thedaily] (http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily) Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. ... Read more

13 Jan 2022

31 MINS

31:31

13 Jan 2022