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Speaking of Psychology podcast

Speaking of Psychology

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

 

#187

Men, masculinity and mental health, with Ronald F. Levant, EdD

Stoic. Self-reliant. Unemotional. For many men, these watchwords of traditional masculinity still hold powerful sway. Men are less likely than women to seek help for mental health issues, they die by suicide more often, and they commit and are the victims of more homicides. Ronald F. Levant, EdD, discusses how cultural expectations of masculinity affect men’s mental and physical health, how our ideas of masculinity have changed over time and what psychologists have learned about how to reach out to men. ... Read more

13 Oct 2021

36 MINS

36:30

13 Oct 2021


#186

ADHD among children and adults, with Margaret Sibley, PhD

For many people, the stereotypical image of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is an 8-year-old boy who can’t sit still in class. But in recent decades, scientists have gained a more sophisticated understanding of the causes and lifelong consequences of the disorder. Margaret Sibley, PhD, of Seattle Children’s Hospital, talks about the biological underpinnings of ADHD, what researchers have learned about how it manifests in childhood, adolescence and adulthood, treatment options, and why the pandemic may have caused an uptick in ADHD diagnoses. ... Read more

06 Oct 2021

26 MINS

26:26

06 Oct 2021


#185

The psychology of science denial, doubt and disbelief, with Gale Sinatra, PhD, and Barbara Hofer, Ph...

On hot-button topics such as climate change, vaccines and genetically modified foods, science denial is rampant – and it crosses party and ideological lines. What are the psychological forces that lead people to disbelieve scientific consensus?  Is science denial worse than it’s ever been? How have the internet and social media changed the landscape of science skepticism? Psychologists Barbara Hofer of Middlebury College and Gale Sinatra of the University of Southern California, authors of the book “Science Denial: Why it Happens and What to Do About it,” discuss these and other questions. ... Read more

29 Sep 2021

36 MINS

36:20

29 Sep 2021


#184

How science can help you change your behavior for the better with Katy Milkman, PhD

What can you learn from the science of behavior change that can help you make the changes you want to see in your life? Katy Milkman, PhD, a professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and author of the book “How to Change,” discusses the importance of accurately identifying the behavioral roadblocks standing in your way, how specific strategies such as “temptation bundling” and creating fresh starts can help you achieve your goals, how to turn laziness to your advantage by setting the right defaults, and more. ... Read more

22 Sep 2021

40 MINS

40:58

22 Sep 2021


#183

The seven sins of memory, with Daniel Schacter, PhD

Human memory is imperfect – we all misplace our keys, forget acquaintances’ names and misremember the details of our own past. Daniel Schacter, PhD, a professor of psychology at Harvard University, discusses why memory is so fallible, the causes and consequences of the most common memory errors, how memory changes as we age, and how memory is tied to our ability to plan for the future. ... Read more

15 Sep 2021

41 MINS

41:13

15 Sep 2021


#182

Twenty years after 9/11, what have we learned about collective trauma? With Roxane Cohen Silver, PhD

This week marks 20 years since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Researchers call this kind of shared disaster a “collective trauma.” Roxane Cohen Silver, PhD, of the University of California Irvine, who studies collective trauma and led a multi-year study on the mental and physical health effects of 9/11, discusses that research and how what we learned in the aftermath of 9/11 can inform our response to the COVID-19 pandemic, hurricanes, wildfires and the other large-scale disasters. ... Read more

08 Sep 2021

37 MINS

37:53

08 Sep 2021


#181

Power: How you get it, how it can change you, with Dacher Keltner, PhD

What is power? Why do people seek it and how do they get it? Is it human nature to abuse power? And how might power – or powerlessness – affect our health and wellbeing? Dacher Keltner, PhD, psychology professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of the book “The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence,” discusses these and other questions. Links [Greater Good Science Center] (https://greatergood.berkeley.edu) <a href= "https://www.amazon.com/Power-Paradox-Gain-Lose-Influence/dp/1594205248/ref=as_li_ss_tl?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1463427292&sr=1-1&keywords=power+paradox&linkCode=sl1&tag=gregooscicen-20&linkId=3f16426a66857aa003ec1146e874db11"> The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence</a> [Speaking of Psychology Listener Survey] (https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey) ... Read more

01 Sep 2021

36 MINS

36:17

01 Sep 2021


#180

Sport psychology, peak performance and athletes’ mental health, with Jamie Shapiro, PhD

The mental health of athletes has been in the news a lot this year, thanks to Olympians Naomi Osaka and Simone Biles. The attention may be new, but the field of sport psychology is not. How do sport psychologists work with athletes? How might athletes’ mental health affect the public perception of mental health? As a mental performance consultant for the U.S. Paralympic team and a former competitive gymnast, Dr. Jamie Shapiro understands the challenges athletes face.   [Speaking of Psychology - Listener Survey] (https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey) ... Read more

25 Aug 2021

36 MINS

36:19

25 Aug 2021


#179

Creativity, insight and “eureka moments,” with John Kounios, PhD

“Eureka moments” have led to some of humanity’s greatest achievements in science, medicine, mathematics and the arts. But they’re not always that dramatic -- we’ve nearly all had the experience of solving a nagging problem in a flash of insight when we’re least expecting it. John Kounios, PhD, a professor of psychology at Drexel University, discusses how does this type of creative insight differs from more analytical thinking, where creative insight comes from in the brain, and how can you encourage more creativity in yourself and set yourself up to experience more of these “aha moments.” Listener Survey - <a href= "https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey">https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> ... Read more

18 Aug 2021

43 MINS

43:13

18 Aug 2021


#178

The psychology of superstition, with Stuart Vyse, PhD

Just in time for Friday the 13th, we discuss the psychology of superstition with Stuart Vyse, PhD, author of the book “Believing in Magic: The Psychology of Superstition.” Vyse discusses the origins of some popular superstitions, the psychological purposes superstition serves, and whether or not it’s possible that your lucky charm or pre-game ritual might actually help you perform better. Listener Survey - <a href= "https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey">https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> ... Read more

11 Aug 2021

38 MINS

38:14

11 Aug 2021


#177

Encore: How children’s amazing brains shaped humanity, with Alison Gopnik, PhD

Speaking of Psychology is taking a one-week summer break, so we’re revisiting one of our favorite episodes from the past year. In February, we talked to University of California, Berkeley psychologist Alison Gopnik about how children’s brains are optimized to explore the world and the implications that this has for human evolution, how we think about the purpose of childhood, how we raise and educate our children, the role of grandparents in teaching the next generation, and even how we might develop artificial intelligence systems inspired by children’s remarkable learning abilities. Listener Survey - <a href= "https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey">https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> ... Read more

04 Aug 2021

45 MINS

45:32

04 Aug 2021


#176

Why we’re burned out and what to do about it, with Christina Maslach, PhD

The word “burnout” has become ubiquitous -- it seems to sum up the stress and exhaustion and disaffection that many of us are feeling this year. But are workers really more burned out than ever? And what does the term burnout actually mean? How does burnout differ from fatigue or stress? How do you know if you’re burned out? And what can individuals, employers and society do to combat workplace burnout? Dr. Christina Maslach answers these and other questions.  Listener Survey - <a href= "https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey">https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> ... Read more

28 Jul 2021

29 MINS

29:28

28 Jul 2021


#175

Tasty words, colorful sounds: How people with synesthesia experience the world, with Julia Simner, P...

More than 4% of people have some form of synesthesia, a neurological condition that causes senses to link and merge. People with synesthesia may taste words, hear colors, or see calendar dates arrayed in physical space. Dr. Julia Simner, a professor of neuropsychology at the University of Sussex in the U.K., discusses the many forms of synesthesia, how synesthetes experience the world, and what scientists have learned from brain imaging studies about synesthesia. She also discusses her research on other sensory differences such as misophonia, an extreme aversion to specific sounds. Listener Survey - <a href= "https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey">https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> ... Read more

21 Jul 2021

38 MINS

38:21

21 Jul 2021


#174

Can a personality test determine if you’re a good fit for a job? With Fred Oswald, PhD

These days, many companies use assessments such as personality tests as part of the hiring process or in career development programs. Fred Oswald, PhD, director of the Organization and Workforce Laboratory at Rice University, discusses why companies use these tests, what employers and workers can learn from them, and how new technologies, including artificial intelligence, are changing workplace assessments. Listener Survey - <a href= "https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey">https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> ... Read more

14 Jul 2021

43 MINS

43:17

14 Jul 2021


#173

How to overcome feeling like an impostor, with Lisa Orbé-Austin, PhD, and Kevin Cokley, PhD

Do you ever feel like a phony? Like you’re not really qualified for the job you’re doing, despite your achievements? Those are signs of the impostor phenomenon, also called impostor syndrome. Dr. Lisa Orbé-Austin, a counseling psychologist and career coach in New York City, and Dr. Kevin Cokley, a University of Texas at Austin psychology professor who studies the impostor phenomenon among ethnic minority students, discuss where impostor feelings come from, the repercussions they can have in people’s lives, and what you can do to address imposter feelings. Listener Survey - <a href= "https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey">https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> ... Read more

07 Jul 2021

33 MINS

33:52

07 Jul 2021


#172

Back to the office? The future of remote and hybrid work, with Tsedal Neeley, PhD

Many Americans are headed back to the office this summer, but fault lines are emerging between some companies’ expectations for in-person work and their employees’ desire to continue working remotely. Tsedal Neeley, PhD, a professor at Harvard Business School and author of “Remote Work Revolution: Succeeding from Anywhere,” discusses the future of the post-pandemic office, how the pandemic has changed office culture and how employees and companies can both thrive in the new world of remote and hybrid work. Listener Survey - <a href= "https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey">https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> ... Read more

30 Jun 2021

34 MINS

34:29

30 Jun 2021


#171

The history of LGBTQ psychology from Stonewall to now, with Peter Hegarty, PhD

Over the past decades, the focus of LGBTQ activism has shifted and evolved, from the AIDS crisis in the 1980s to the fight for marriage equality to the focus on transgender rights today. Peter Hegarty, PhD, author of the book “A Recent History of Lesbian and Gay Psychology: From Homophobia to LGBT,” discusses how psychological research has reflected and responded to these changes, how it has helped move the needle in the fight for LGBTQ rights in the U.S. court system, and his own research on “auditory gaydar” and continuing discrimination against LGBTQ people. Listener Survey - https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey ... Read more

23 Jun 2021

48 MINS

48:04

23 Jun 2021


#170

How ‘open science’ is changing psychological research, with Brian Nosek, PhD

Is psychology research in a crisis or a renaissance? Over the past decade, scientists have realized that many published research results, including some classic findings in psychology, don’t always hold up to repeat trials. Brian Nosek, PhD, of the Center for Open Science, discusses how psychologists are leading a movement to address that problem, in psychology and in other scientific fields, by changing the way that research studies get funded, conducted and published. Listener Survey - https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey ... Read more

16 Jun 2021

41 MINS

41:25

16 Jun 2021


#169

What do we know about preventing gun violence? With Susan Sorenson, PhD

Guns killed nearly 44,000 Americans in 2020, a higher number than in any other year in the past two decades. Meanwhile, a spate of mass shootings in the spring brought gun violence to the forefront of the national conversation again. Susan Sorenson, PhD, director of the Ortner Center on Violence and Abuse at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses what we know about the causes and consequences of gun violence in the United States and whether research can offer any insight into how to prevent it. Listener Survey - https://www.apa.org/podcastsurvey ... Read more

09 Jun 2021

31 MINS

31:36

09 Jun 2021


#168

COVID 19, Insomnia, and the Importance of Sleep, with Jennifer Martin, PhD

Is your sleep schedule a mess lately? You’re not alone. The stress and disrupted routines of the past year have taken a toll on our sleep. Jennifer Martin, PhD, a professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and spokesperson for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, discusses how sleep affects our physical and mental health, what the pandemic has done to our sleep patterns, and effective behavioral treatments and advice that can help us get a good night’s rest. Links <a href= "https://aasm.org/aasm-spokesperson-jennifer-martin-phd/">Jennifer Martin, PhD</a> Take our listener survey at <a href= "https://apa.org/podcastsurvey">apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> ... Read more

02 Jun 2021

29 MINS

29:29

02 Jun 2021


#167

The future of policing one year after George Floyd's death, with Cedric Alexander, PsyD

One year ago this week, George Floyd was murdered on camera by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. To mark the anniversary of Floyd’s death, we talked to Cedric Alexander, PsyD, a clinical psychologist and former police chief, about community policing, racial bias in policing, how communities and policymakers might rethink the role of police officers in ensuring public safety, and what can be done to restore trust between police departments and the communities that they serve. Links [Cedric Alexander, PsyD] (https://clalexandergroup.com/about-me/) Take our listener survey at <a href= "https://apa.org/podcastsurvey">apa.org/podcastsurvey</a> Image Credit: Photo by Matthew Coughlin ... Read more

26 May 2021

37 MINS

37:10

26 May 2021


#166

Technology is changing how we talk to each other, with Jeff Hancock, PhD

Zoom, Facebook, group text messages: This past year, technology has sometimes felt like the glue that’s kept many of our relationships alive. More and more, we talk to each other with technology in between us. Jeff Hancock, PhD, director of the Social Media Lab at Stanford University, discusses how this is affecting human communication, including whether people are more likely to lie online, whether the versions of ourselves that we present on social media are authentic, how artificial intelligence infiltrates our text messages, why video calls exhaust us more than in-person conversations, and more. Are you enjoying Speaking of Psychology? We’d love to know what you think of the podcast, what you would change about it, and what you’d like to hear more of. Please take our listener survey at <a href= "https://apa.org/podcastsurvey">www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a>. Links [Jeff Hancock, PhD] (https://comm.stanford.edu/faculty-hancock/)   ... Read more

19 May 2021

31 MINS

31:59

19 May 2021


#165

Can a “growth mindset” help students achieve their potential? With David Yeager, PhD

In recent years, research on the power of growth mindset has made the leap from the psychology lab to popular culture. Growth mindset is the belief that a person’s intelligence and abilities can grow and improve with practice, and researchers have found that brief exercises that increase growth mindset can help keep students motivated when they face challenges, improve their grades, and even increase college graduation rates. But scaling up those interventions from the research lab to diverse real-life settings is challenging. Dr. David Yeager, an associate professor of developmental psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, discusses the science of growth mindset and how it could help close academic achievement gaps. Are you enjoying Speaking of Psychology? We’d love to know what you think of the podcast, what you would change about it, and what you’d like to hear more of. Please take our listener survey at <a href= "https://apa.org/podcastsurvey">www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a>. Links [David Yeager, PhD] (https://labs.la.utexas.edu/adrg/about-dr-yeager/) ... Read more

12 May 2021

31 MINS

31:39

12 May 2021


#164

What is it like to remember every day of your life? With Michael Yassa, PhD, and Markie Pasternak

For people with Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory, or HSAM, every day is memorable. Ask them what they were doing on this date 10 years ago, and they’ll be able to tell you. Markie Pasternak, one of the youngest people identified with HSAM, and Michael Yassa, PhD, director of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory at the University of California Irvine, talk about what it’s like to have this ability, what we know about how the brains of people with HSAM store and retrieve this vast amount of autobiographical information, and what studying this unique ability can teach us more generally about how memory works. Are you enjoying Speaking of Psychology? We’d love to know what you think of the podcast, what you would change about it, and what you’d like to hear more of. Please take our listener survey at www.apa.org/podcastsurvey. Links Michael Yassa, PhD - faculty.sites.uci.edu/myassa Markie Pasternak - http://livingwithtotalrecall.home.blog ... Read more

05 May 2021

38 MINS

38:50

05 May 2021


#163

Your Brain Is Not What You Think It Is, with Lisa Feldman Barrett, PhD

What if the way you think about your brain and how and why it functions is just plain wrong? Lisa Feldman Barrett, PhD, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University and author of the book “7 ½ Lessons About the Brain,” discusses myths about the brain and her theory that it evolved not to think but to control our bodies, and that emotions are not something we experience, but things that the brain creates in order to make sense of the signals it receives from the world. Are you enjoying Speaking of Psychology? We’d love to know what you think of the podcast, what you would change about it, and what you’d like to hear more of. Please take our listener survey at <a href= "https://apa.org/podcastsurvey">www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a>. Links [Lisa Feldman Barrett, PhD] (https://lisafeldmanbarrett.com) <a href= "https://lisafeldmanbarrett.com/books/seven-and-a-half-lessons-about-the-brain/"> 7 ½ Lessons About the Brain</a> ... Read more

28 Apr 2021

38 MINS

38:06

28 Apr 2021


#162

How to cope with climate anxiety, with Thomas Doherty, PsyD, and Ashlee Cunsolo, PhD

Over the past several years, climate change has moved from an abstract idea to a reality in many Americans’ lives – a reality that we are increasingly worried about. An APA survey found that two-thirds of American adults said that they felt at least a little “eco-anxiety,” defined as anxiety or worry about climate change and its effects. Dr. Thomas Doherty, a clinical and environmental psychologist in Portland, Oregon, and Dr. Ashlee Cunsolo, a public health researcher who studies how environmental loss is affecting the mental health of the indigenous Inuit community in Canada, discuss the mental health effects of climate change and what can we do to cope and build resilience in ourselves. Are you enjoying Speaking of Psychology? We’d love to know what you think of the podcast, what you would change about it, and what you’d like to hear more of. Please take our listener survey at <a href= "https://apa.org/podcastsurvey">www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a>. Links [Thomas Doherty, PsyD] (https://selfsustain.com) [Ashlee Cunsolo, PhD] (https://ashleecunsolo.ca) <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2020/02/climate-change">Survey - Majority of US Adults Believe Climate Change Is Most Important Issue Today</a> ... Read more

21 Apr 2021

35 MINS

35:28

21 Apr 2021


#161

Why you should talk to strangers, with Gillian Sandstrom, PhD, and Jon Levy

Despite the fact that so many people profess to dislike making small talk, it turns out that talking to strangers and acquaintances can actually strengthen our mental health and enrich our lives. What do we gain from meeting new people? What have we been missing out on this past year as COVID-19 has restricted these social interactions? And how can we become better at talking to strangers? We discuss these questions with Gillian Sandstrom, PhD, a senior lecturer in psychology at the University of Essex who studies what she calls “minimal social interactions,” and Jon Levy, a consultant, writer and speaker who founded “the Influencers Dinner,” a regular gathering that brings together strangers who are leaders in their fields. Are you enjoying Speaking of Psychology? We’d love to know what you think of the podcast, what you would change about it, and what you’d like to hear more of. Please take our listener survey at <a href= "https://apa.org/podcastsurvey">www.apa.org/podcastsurvey</a>. Links [Gillian Sandstrom, PhD] (https://gilliansandstrom.com) [Jon Levy] (https://www.jonlevytlb.com) ... Read more

14 Apr 2021

41 MINS

41:13

14 Apr 2021