Speaking of Psychology podcast

Speaking of Psychology

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

 

#327

Mental health in a warming world, with Kim Meidenbauer, PhD, and Amruta Nori-Sarma, PhD

Last year -- 2023 -- was the world’s warmest on record, and 2024 could bring another record-shattering summer. Psychologist Kim Meidenbauer, PhD, and public health researcher Amruta Nori-Sarma, PhD, discuss how heat affects people’s mental health, emotions and even cognitive abilities; the link between heat, violence and aggression; who is most vulnerable to the effects of extreme heat; and what policy makers could be doing to mitigate its effects. ... Read more

19 Jun 2024

39 MINS

39:26

19 Jun 2024


#326

How to motivate yourself and others, with Wendy Grolnick, PhD, and Frank Worrell, PhD

Why can’t I get myself to run that 5K? Why isn’t my child getting better grades? We all have things that we struggle to accomplish – or that we struggle to get someone else to accomplish. Frank Worrell, PhD, and Wendy Grolnick, PhD, co-authors of “Motivation Myth Busters: Science-based Strategies to Boost Motivation in Yourself and Others,” discuss how our misconceptions about motivation get in the way of reaching our goals, why there’s no such thing as an “unmotivated” person, and the merits and drawbacks of strategies like rewards, competition and praise. ... Read more

12 Jun 2024

36 MINS

36:58

12 Jun 2024


#325

The benefits of solitude, with Thuy-vy Nguyen, PhD, and Netta Weinstein, PhD

The average American adult spends up to one-third of their waking hours alone. Psychologists are exploring how those hours spent on our own affect us – including the potential benefits, as well as the challenges, of solitude. Thuy-vy Nguyen, PhD, and Netta Weinstein, PhD, discuss the difference between solitude and loneliness, how solitude affects our emotions and stress levels, why some people crave solitude more than others, and why the stigma against solitude can make us uncomfortable with being alone. ... Read more

05 Jun 2024

45 MINS

45:31

05 Jun 2024


#324

Which countries are happiest and why? With Lara Aknin, PhD

The 2024 World Happiness Report, which ranks the happiness levels of countries around the world, found that young Americans are less happy than their peers in many other countries. Psychology professor Lara Aknin, PhD, an editor of the report, talks about how the report defines happiness, why young people’s happiness levels may have dropped in the U.S, what drives happiness, and why being generous makes people happy – even when they don’t have much to spare. ... Read more

29 May 2024

31 MINS

31:31

29 May 2024


#323

Choosing to be child free, with Jennifer Watling Neal, PhD

A growing number of adults in the U.S. are choosing not to have children. Jenna Watling Neal, PhD, of Michigan State University, talks about her research that’s found 1 in 5 adults are child free, why people are choosing not to have kids, the stigma child-free adults face, whether people who decide not to have kids early in life usually stick with that choice, and how the prevalence of child-free adults in the U.S. compares with other countries. ... Read more

22 May 2024

31 MINS

31:23

22 May 2024


#322

How to cope with political stress this election season, with Brett Q. Ford, PhD, and Kevin Smith, Ph...

If the thought of the upcoming election sends your stress level through the roof, you’re not alone. Psychologist Brett Q. Ford, PhD, and political scientist Kevin Smith, PhD, talk about how political stress affects people’s well-being; what high levels of political stress mean for people’s lives, for the U.S. and for democracy; and how to stay politically engaged while still maintaining your mental health. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

15 May 2024

35 MINS

35:40

15 May 2024


#321

How Sesame Street teaches kids about emotional well-being, with Rosemarie Truglio, PhD

Sesame Street has entertained and educated generations of children. Developmental psychologist Rosemarie Truglio, PhD, Sesame Workshop’s senior vice president of curriculum and content, talks about why the show has a new focus on young children’s emotional well-being; how Sesame Street translates complicated concepts into stories that young kids can connect with; the research that underpins all of the content on Sesame Street; and why the Sesame Street characters still resonate with so many adults. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

08 May 2024

34 MINS

34:38

08 May 2024


#320

What déjà vu can teach us about memory, with Chris Moulin, PhD

The eerie sensation of “déjà vu” -- feeling a strong sense of familiarity in a new place or situation -- is one of memory’s strangest tricks. Researcher Chris Moulin, PhD, of Grenoble Alpes University, talks about why déjà vu happens; why both déjà vu and its lesser-known opposite, jamais vu, may actually be signs of a healthy memory at work; why young people are more prone to déjà vu; how he and others study déjà vu and jamais vu in the lab; and what these experiences can teach us about memory more broadly. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

01 May 2024

39 MINS

39:15

01 May 2024


#319

The psychology of sports fans, with Daniel Wann, PhD

Are you a sports “superfan”? Or do you wonder what’s driving the superfans in your life? Daniel Wann, PhD, of Murray State University, talks about why being a fan is usually good for people’s mental health, how they choose the teams they root for, why some are fair-weather fans while others love to cheer for the underdog, how fandom is changing among younger people, and whether a crowd of supportive fans can affect the outcome of a game. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

24 Apr 2024

40 MINS

40:37

24 Apr 2024


#318

You can learn new things at any age, with Rachel Wu, PhD

Picking up a new skill as an adult can seem daunting. But research suggests that learning new things as you age may be key to keeping your cognitive skills sharp -- and that middle aged and older adults may be just as good at learning as younger people are. Rachel Wu, PhD, of the University of California Riverside, talks about why lifelong learning matters, how adults can learn more like kids, why feedback and failure are important, and what types of learning opportunities to seek out. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

17 Apr 2024

25 MINS

25:54

17 Apr 2024


#317

Understanding the mind of a serial killer, with Louis Schlesinger, PhD

From Jack the Ripper to Jeffrey Dahmer to the Gilgo Beach killer, serial killers have long inspired public fear – and public fascination. Louis Schlesinger, PhD, a professor of psychology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York and co-investigator of a research project on sexual and serial murder with the FBI Behavioral Science Unit, talks about what we really know about these murderers’ motivations and their methods, how some manage to avoid capture for so long, and how forensic psychology research can help investigators solve cases. ... Read more

10 Apr 2024

46 MINS

46:20

10 Apr 2024


#316

Coping with family estrangement, with Lucy Blake, PhD

Being estranged from a family member -- a parent, sibling or adult child -- is far more common than people think. Dr. Lucy Blake, author of “No Family is Perfect: A Guide to Embracing the Messy Reality,” talks about why family estrangement happens, why estrangement encompasses more than just “no contact,” the stigma around estrangement, and where and how to find support. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

03 Apr 2024

28 MINS

28:01

03 Apr 2024


#315

How to help kids navigate friendship, with Eileen Kennedy-Moore, PhD

It isn’t always easy to navigate the complicated social dynamics of elementary, middle or high school. Clinical psychologist and kids’ friendship expert Eileen Kennedy-Moore, PhD, talks about how kids make and keep friends; how their understanding of friendship changes as they grow; why most kids are mean sometimes; and how to help kids navigate tough situations including arguments and friendship breakups. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

27 Mar 2024

44 MINS

44:31

27 Mar 2024


#314

Bridging the generation gap at work, with Megan Gerhardt, PhD

As Gen Z enters the workforce and older workers put off retirement, some workplaces may see five generations sharing an office -- from the Silent Generation all the way to Gen Z. Megan Gerhardt, PhD, of Miami University, talks about why it’s important to move past generational stereotypes, why age diversity is a strength, and what older and younger workers can learn from each other. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

20 Mar 2024

44 MINS

44:57

20 Mar 2024


#313

Expressive writing can help your mental health, with James Pennebaker, PhD

Writing can be a powerful tool to help people work through challenges in their lives and improve their mental health. James Pennebaker, PhD, of the University of Texas at Austin, talks about why expressive writing can be good for mental health and how to try it. He also discusses his research on language use, and how analyzing the words that people use in their daily lives can offer insights into their emotions, motivations and personality. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

13 Mar 2024

44 MINS

44:00

13 Mar 2024


#312

How music, memory and emotion are connected, with Elizabeth Margulis, PhD

The right song can make us feel chills, help pull us out of a bad mood, or take us back in time to the first time we heard it. Elizabeth Margulis, PhD, director of the Music Cognition Lab at Princeton University, talks about how music, memory, emotion and imagination intertwine; why people are especially attached to music from their teen years; whether there’s any music that’s considered universally beautiful; why repetition is important in music; and why we so often get “earworms” stuck in our head. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

06 Mar 2024

39 MINS

39:43

06 Mar 2024


#311

What’s going on inside your cat’s head? With Kristyn Vitale, PhD

Cats have long had a reputation as standoffish pets, but many cat owners will tell you that the cat-human bond can run deep. Cat psychologist Kristyn Vitale, PhD, talks about new research on cats’ cognitive and social abilities; why cats really are as emotionally attached to us as we are to them; the best ways to enrich your cat’s life; and how to finally get your cat to stop scratching your couch. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

28 Feb 2024

30 MINS

30:25

28 Feb 2024


#310

Designing cities to improve mental health, with Jenny Roe, PhD

The world is an increasingly urban place, and with urban living comes traffic, noise, pollution and other hassles. But cities don’t have to wear us down. Jenny Roe, PhD, of University of Virginia, talks about how to design cities that support mental health and well-being with elements like access to nature and spaces that encourage community, how our physical environment affects our mental health and the importance of equity and access in city design. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

21 Feb 2024

29 MINS

29:51

21 Feb 2024


#309

Love and algorithms: The future of dating apps, with Liesel Sharabi, PhD

Over the past two decades, dating apps have become the most common way for people to meet a partner. Liesel Sharabi, PhD, director of the Relationships and Technology Lab at Arizona State University, discusses how that shift has changed how people meet and form relationships, whether relationships that start online are more or less likely to succeed, what you can do to avoid dating app burnout, and how developing technologies such as AI and virtual reality could change dating in the future. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

14 Feb 2024

32 MINS

32:58

14 Feb 2024


#308

How video games can help kids learn and grow, with Susan Rivers, PhD

Video games get a bad rap -- but the right games can be a tool to reach kids and teach them important social emotional and academic skills. Susan Rivers, PhD, chief scientist at the nonprofit iThrive Games, talks about how to design games that are both entertaining and educational, what kinds of skills kids can learn through gaming and how parents can balance screen time concerns with recognizing the important role games play in their kids’ lives. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

07 Feb 2024

29 MINS

29:23

07 Feb 2024


#307

How to use AI ethically, with Nathanael Fast, PhD

Artificial intelligence is already changing how people work, learn, play and live. As these technologies develop, it will be crucial to understand how they interact with human behavior to make sure we use AI safely and ethically. Nathanael Fast, PhD, executive director of the Neely Center for Ethical Leadership and Decision Making at the USC Marshall School of Business and co-director of the Psychology of Technology Institute, talks about how AI affects people’s decision-making, whether most of us trust AI, and why it’s important to make sure that the potential benefits of AI flow to everyone, not just the most privileged. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

31 Jan 2024

29 MINS

29:11

31 Jan 2024


#306

How to learn from regret, with Robert Leahy, PhD

Regret is painful – but it can also be productive, pushing us to make better decisions and needed changes in our lives. Dr. Robert Leahy, author of the book “If Only…Finding Freedom From Regret,” talks about the difference between productive and unproductive regret, why some people seem to ruminate on their regrets more than others, what to do if regret is consuming your thoughts, and whether people have more regrets than they used to. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

24 Jan 2024

44 MINS

44:21

24 Jan 2024


#305

How to fail successfully, with Amy Edmondson, PhD, and Samuel West, PhD

Remember New Coke? Colgate frozen lasagna? The Hawaii chair? History is littered with commercial failures. Harvard Business School professor Amy Edmondson, PhD, author of “Right Kind of Wrong: The Science of Failing Well,” and organizational psychologist Samuel West, PhD, curator of the Museum of Failure, talk about some of commerce’s biggest flops, the difference between simply failing and “failing well;” and how individuals and organizations can get past the fear of failure, recognize its potential upsides and learn from their mistakes. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

17 Jan 2024

48 MINS

48:50

17 Jan 2024


#304

Why diversity matters, with Robert Sellers, PhD

The words diversity, equity and inclusion have become political flashpoints -- but the science and evidence on why diversity matters is often ignored. Robert Sellers, PhD, of the University of Michigan, talks about why diverse groups lead to better outcomes and how psychologists’ research has informed our understanding of diversity in our schools, workplaces and other institutions. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

10 Jan 2024

40 MINS

40:29

10 Jan 2024


#303

The benefits of being bilingual, with Viorica Marian, PhD

More than half the world’s population speaks more than one language. Viorica Marian, PhD, of Northwestern University, talks about why speaking multiple languages may have far-reaching cognitive benefits, how the bilingual brain processes language and how the languages we speak shape the way we think and perceive the world. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

03 Jan 2024

43 MINS

43:05

03 Jan 2024


#302

Encore - How to get unstuck with Adam Alter, PhD

Everyone gets stuck sometimes: in a creative pursuit that stalls, in a job or a relationship that isn’t working out, or even just at an exercise plateau. NYU psychologist Adam Alter, PhD, author of “Anatomy of a Breakthrough: How to Get Unstuck When It Matters Most,” talks about why getting stuck is such a universal experience, what you can do to get stuck less often, how you know when it’s time to quit versus push ahead, and the practical steps you can take to get past the mental or emotional hurdles that are keeping you stuck. For transcripts, links and more information, please visit the <a href= "https://www.apa.org/news/podcasts/speaking-of-psychology">Speaking of Psychology Homepage</a>. ... Read more

27 Dec 2023

34 MINS

34:31

27 Dec 2023


#301

Encore - Living a happy single life, with Geoff MacDonald, PhD

More Americans than ever before are single -- about half of American adults are unmarried and close to three in 10 are not in a committed relationship. Geoff MacDonald, PhD, of the University of Toronto, talks about how relationship status is related to well-being, whether there is a societal stigma against singles, and why there is so much more research on being in a happy relationship than there is on being happily single. ... Read more

20 Dec 2023

29 MINS

29:35

20 Dec 2023