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Short Wave podcast

Short Wave

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  NPR  

New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Emily Kwong for science on a different wavelength.If you're hooked, try Short Wave Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/shortwave

New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Emily Kwong for science on a different wavelength.If you're hooked, try Short Wave Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/shortwave

 

#655

The Importance Of The Vaginal Microbiome

Today on Short Wave, researcher Fatima Aysha Hussain talks to host Emily Kwong about how microbes in the vagina can impact health and how transplanting vaginal microbiomes from one vagina to another could help people managing bacterial vaginosis. To learn more about the vaginal microbiome transplant study, visit https://motifstudy.org/. ... Read more

22 hrs Ago

14 MINS

14:21

22 hrs Ago


#654

Who Would Be Most Affected By Roe Reversal

If the U.S. Supreme Court rules in line with the draft decision leaked in early May, the decision to reverse Roe v. Wade affect a much broader group than people who get pregnant. But research shows abortion restrictions have a disproportionate impact on young women, poor women and especially those in communities of color. NPR health correspondent [Yuki Noguchi] (https://www.npr.org/people/96022165/yuki-noguchi) talks to Short Wave scientist-in-residence Regina G. Barber about how this ruling would affect those women and how groups helping them get abortions are preparing.Email the show at [shortwave@npr.org] (mailto:shortwave@npr.org) . ... Read more

13 May 2022

11 MINS

11:33

13 May 2022


#653

A Climate Time Capsule, Part 2: The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

In 1992, diplomats and scientists at the United Nations negotiated the first-ever treaty intended to tackle the climate change. This brought the issue to the forefront and led to a series of conferences that have occurred almost every year for the next 30 years. Short Wave host Emily Kwong talks to freelance climate reporter, [Dan Charles] (http://site.danielcharles.us/) about how those at the conference wrote a clear and ambitious goal that they didn't even fully understand. Plus — why it rattled the fossil fuel industry. This is part 2 of a two-part series. For part 1, check out " [A Climate Time Capsule (Part 1): The Start of the International Climate Change Fight] (https://www.npr.org/2022/05/09/1097667660/climate-reporter-dan-charles-talks-about-the-start-of-the-uns-climate-change-fig) "Email Short Wave at [ShortWave@NPR.org] (mailto:ShortWave@NPR.org) . ... Read more

12 May 2022

12 MINS

12:40

12 May 2022


#652

A Climate Time Capsule (Part 1): The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

In 1992, diplomats and scientists at the United Nations negotiated the first-ever treaty intended to tackle the scientific phenomenon now known as climate change. This brought the issue to the forefront and led to a series of conferences that would occur almost every year for the next 30 years. Short Wave host Emily Kwong talks to freelance climate reporter, [Dan Charles] (http://site.danielcharles.us/) , about how those at the conference wrote a clear and ambitious goal that they didn't even fully understand.Email the show at [shortwave@npr.org] (mailto:shortwave@npr.org) . ... Read more

11 May 2022

14 MINS

14:09

11 May 2022


#651

Stephanie's Story: How COVID Misinformation Affected One Family

Stephanie was usually careful about her health and regular vaccinations. But then she got into sharing conspiracy-filled videos and fringe ideas. When COVID hit, misinformation put her and her husband at risk. Science correspondent and editor Geoff Brumfiel shares with Emily Kwong what he learned in reporting Stephanie's story. You can follow Emily on Twitter [@EmilyKwong1234] (https://twitter.com/emilykwong1234?s=20&t=t6Mx2yIZvaVB5VEWp-nBYw) and Geoff at [@GBrumfiel] (https://twitter.com/gbrumfiel?s=20&t=t6Mx2yIZvaVB5VEWp-nBYw) . Email Short Wave at [ShortWave@NPR.org] (mailto:ShortWave@NPR.org) . ... Read more

10 May 2022

14 MINS

14:28

10 May 2022


#650

The Turnaway Study: What The Research Says About Abortion

A [leaked draft opinion] (https://www.politico.com/news/2022/05/02/read-justice-alito-initial-abortion-opinion-overturn-roe-v-wade-pdf-00029504) in the Supreme Court case [Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization] (https://www.supremecourt.gov/search.aspx?filename=/docket/docketfiles/html/public/19-1392.html) has placed uncertainty on the future of abortion rights in the United States. As written, the opinion would overturn Roe v. Wade protections. We at Short Wave were immediately curious about the data behind abortions: What happens when pregnant people are denied abortions? For answers, we turned to [Dr. Diana Greene Foster] (https://www.ansirh.org/about/staff/diana-greene-foster-phd) , the lead researcher on the interdisciplinary team behind The Turnaway Study. For over a decade, she and her fellow researchers followed just under a thousand women who sought an abortion across 21 states. These data may give us insight into pregnant people's lives in a post Roe v. Wade United States. - Read more about The Turnaway Study on UCSF's website: [https://bit.ly/3P1tV8B] (https://bit.ly/3P1tV8B) - Read the research resulting from The Turnaway Study: [https://bit.ly/3KNAit8] (https://bit.ly/3KNAit8) - Read Dr. Foster's book, The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having — or Being Denied — an Abortion: [https://bit.ly/3si0i9z] (https://bit.ly/3si0i9z) ... Read more

09 May 2022

14 MINS

14:42

09 May 2022


#649

Lessons From HIV On Ending The COVID Pandemic

The world has come a long way since the COVID-19 pandemic began. There are now vaccines, at-home tests, masks and treatments. With all of these tools available, why is COVID still here?Health policy correspondent Selena Simmons-Duffin talks to Scientist-In-Residence Regina Barber about what we can learn from the public health advocates working to end the HIV epidemic, how those lessons may translate to ending COVID and why having the scientific tools isn't enough. ... Read more

06 May 2022

11 MINS

11:52

06 May 2022


#648

When Our Star Erupts - The 1859 Solar Storm And More

In 1859, astronomer Richard Carrington was studying the Sun when he witnessed the most intense geomagnetic storm recorded in history. The storm, triggered by a giant solar flare, sent brilliant auroral displays across the globe and causing electrical sparking and fires in telegraph stations.Short Wave's scientist-in-residence Regina G. Barber talks to solar physicist [Dr. Samaiyah Farid] (https://astronomy.yale.edu/people/samaiyah-farid) about what's now known as the Carrington event and about what may happen the next time a massive solar storm hits Earth. You can check out NASA's [Solar Dynamics Observatory] (https://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/) for pictures of our Sun in real-time: [go.nasa.gov/3LOWV1u] (https://go.nasa.gov/3LOWV1u) Curious about other parts of our solar system? Email the show at [shortwave@npr.org] (mailto:shortwave@npr.org) . ... Read more

05 May 2022

12 MINS

12:12

05 May 2022


#647

Emotions — They're Not Just For Humans

Scientists have discovered the underpinnings of animal emotions. As NPR brain correspondent [Jon Hamilton] (https://www.npr.org/people/2100615/jon-hamilton) reports, the building blocks of emotions and of emotional disorders can be found across lots of animals. That discovery is helping scientists understand human emotions like fear, anger — and even joy. Express your joy, fear and fine — even your scientific rage to us. We're at [shortwave@npr.org] (mailto:shortwave@npr.org) . ... Read more

04 May 2022

11 MINS

11:35

04 May 2022


#646

Why You Should Give A Dam About Beavers!

Beavers have long been considered pests by landowners and government agencies. But now, many are starting to embrace them. Today on the show, Host Aaron Scott tells Host Emily Kwong how these furry ecosystem engineers are showing scientists a way to save threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. [Watch the video Aaron filmed with Oregon Field Guide about beavers and stream restoration] (https://bit.ly/3s0ZQfL) . For more videos check out [Oregon Field Guide] (https://www.opb.org/show/oregonfieldguide/) .You can follow Aaron on Twitter [@AaronScottNPR] (https://twitter.com/aaronscottNPR?s=20&t=I18yLNDhoRgjGhs2VY-IoA) and Emily [@EmilyKwong1234] (https://twitter.com/emilykwong1234?s=20&t=I18yLNDhoRgjGhs2VY-IoA) . Email Short Wave at [ShortWave@NPR.org] (mailto:ShortWave@NPR.org) . ... Read more

03 May 2022

13 MINS

13:22

03 May 2022


#645

Why Did The Scientist Cross The Road?...To Meet Kasha Patel!

When Kasha Patel decided to try out stand-up comedy, she was told to joke about what she knew. For her, that was science. Today on Short Wave, Kasha talks to host Emily Kwong about how she developed her sense of humor, how she infuses science into her comedy and why on Earth she analyzed 500 of her jokes. Listen to the end for bonus audio! ... Read more

02 May 2022

13 MINS

13:30

02 May 2022


#644

All Tied Up: The Study of Knots

Climbing enthusiast and producer Thomas Lu has long wondered what makes knots such a powerful tool. Today, Thomas digs into the research with the help of [Matt Berry] (https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthew-berry-6045aa6b) , Quality Assurance Manager at the outdoor gear company Black Diamond Equipment, and researcher [Vishal Patil] (https://stanfordsciencefellows.stanford.edu/people/vishal-patil) .Reach the show by emailing [shortwave@npr.org] (mailto:shortwave@npr.org) . ... Read more

29 Apr 2022

12 MINS

12:46

29 Apr 2022


#643

Planetary Scientists Are Excited About Uranus

Probes to Uranus and to one of Jupiter's moons where conditions might support life; a better plan high-quality science on the moon--those are some of the recommendations in a new 700 page report to NASA. NPR science correspondent [Nell Greenfieldboyce] (https://www.npr.org/people/4494969/nell-greenfieldboyce) has looked at that report and talked to the experts. Today, she sifts through all the juicy details of where NASA is headed the next few decades.Read the [decadal survey] (https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/planetary-science-and-astrobiology-decadal-survey-2023-2032) . Probe the Short Wave minds by emailing [shortwave@npr.org] (mailto:shortwave@npr.org) . ... Read more

28 Apr 2022

12 MINS

12:28

28 Apr 2022


#642

U.S. COVID Case Increases Unlikely To Become A Surge

COVID cases are up due to the Omicron sub-variants and masking is likely to remain optional as the courts wrangle with the transportation mask mandate that a Federal judge struck down last week. NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey talks about both of these issues with host Emily Kwong, and updates listeners on what to expect with children and the vaccine. ... Read more

27 Apr 2022

10 MINS

10:46

27 Apr 2022


#641

The Environmental Cost of Crypto

Cryptocurrencies may exist only in the virtual world, but their impact on our natural resources is huge. That's largely because the technology underpinning crypto is an energy vampire that devours more electricity than do many countries. But that's only part of the story.Short Wave Host Aaron Scott talks to Producer Eva Tesfaye about the many environmental impacts of crypto - beyond its strain on energy - and what various local, state and national governments are doing about it. Check out Short Wave's previous episode about how cryptocurrency works and why its technology sucks up so much energy here: [n.pr/3ETHXVq ] (https://n.pr/3ETHXVq) Email the show at [shortwave@npr.org] (mailto:shortwave@npr.org) . ... Read more

26 Apr 2022

07 MINS

07:53

26 Apr 2022