Science Quickly podcast

Science Quickly

Host Rachel Feltman, alongside leading science and tech journalists, dives into the rich world of scientific discovery in this bite-size science variety show.

Host Rachel Feltman, alongside leading science and tech journalists, dives into the rich world of scientific discovery in this bite-size science variety show.

 

#1306

Cleaning Up Paris’s Poop River for the Olympics

The Seine is set to feature prominently in the Paris 2024 Olympics’ Opening Ceremony—and in its marathon swimming events. But this urban waterway has been challenging to clean and keep clean after a particularly wet summer and high bacterial counts. What can the Parisian organizers learn from the revitalization of a U.S. river that was so polluted that it inspired the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency? Scientific American associate news editor Allison Parshall takes us to the banks of the reformed Cuyahoga River in Ohio.  Plus, she gives us a look at the growing urban river swimming movement in Europe. Recommended Reading [Training with 'Digital Twins' Could Boost Olympic Swimmer Speeds ] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/training-with-digital-twins-could-boost-olympic-swimmer-speeds/) Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with guest and Scientific American associate news editor Allison Parshall. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.  The Seine is set to feature prominently in the Paris 2024 Olympics’ Opening Ceremony—and in its marathon swimming events. But this urban waterway has been challenging to clean and keep clean after a particularly wet summer and high bacterial counts. What can the Parisian organizers learn from the revitalization of a U.S. river that was so polluted that it inspired the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency? Scientific American associate news editor Allison Parshall takes us to the banks of the reformed Cuyahoga River in Ohio.  Plus, she gives us a look at the growing urban river swimming movement in Europe. Recommended Reading Training with 'Digital Twins' Could Boost Olympic Swimmer Speeds [https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/training-with-digital-twins-could-boost-olympic-swimmer-speeds/] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/training-with-digital-twins-could-boost-olympic-swimmer-speeds/)   E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: subscribe to Scientific American: [https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/] (?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) And sign up for Today in Science, our daily newsletter: [https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast%20) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

Yesterday

24 MINS

24:53

Yesterday


#1305

Name a Quasi-Moon with Radiolab Host Latif Nasser

Science journalist and Radiolab host Latif Nasser found himself at the center of a space mystery. A space poster in his child’s room showed Zoozve, a moon circling Venus. Only Nasser had never heard of Zoozve—and neither had anyone else. Nasser brings us the story of Zoozve the quasi-moon and brings listeners the opportunity to name a quasi-moon of their own. Recommended listening [Zoozve] (https://radiolab.org/podcast/zoozve)   Name a Quasi-Moon with Radiolab [Quasi-Moon Contest] (https://radiolab.org/moon-official-rules/)   E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with special guest Latif Nasser, Radiolab host. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

17 Jul 2024

13 MINS

13:16

17 Jul 2024


#1304

The Kavli Prize Presents: Building Materials From The Bottom Up [Sponsored]

Chad Mirkin, recipient of the 2024 Kavli Prize in Nanoscience, has spent his career exploring the possibilities of creating and inventing materials at the nanoscale. This podcast was produced for The Kavli Prize by Scientific American Custom Media, a division separate from the magazine’s board of editors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

16 Jul 2024

09 MINS

09:09

16 Jul 2024


#1303

Astronauts Can Drink More Recycled Pee Than Ever, and You Can Still Catch the Plague

We commemorate the 55th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, dive into NASA’s groundbreaking Mars habitat simulation and discuss the innovative ​​“stillsuits” designed to recycle astronaut pee and how they could enhance spacewalks. Plus, we discuss the record-breaking Hurricane Beryl and its implications for climate change policies, and a surprising case of the plague in Colorado.  Recommended reading: – [One Small Step Back in Time: Relive the Wonder of Apollo 11] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/interactive/one-small-step-back-in-time-relive-the-wonder-of-apollo-11/) – [Why Hurricane Beryl Underwent Unprecedented Rapid Intensification] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-hurricane-beryl-underwent-unprecedented-rapid-intensification/) Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

15 Jul 2024

09 MINS

09:58

15 Jul 2024


#1302

On Thin Ice: Contemplating Our Climate Future in Antarctica (Part 4)

We’re at the end of the Nathaniel B. Palmer’s Antarctic expedition. The researchers onboard are returning sea ice and thousands of gallons of seawater. These samples will allow them to examine biogeochemical processes, some of which are linked to climate change. As the research vessel makes its way back to port, the scientists reflect on the future of our planet and the question of whether the ice in Antarctica will always be around for sampling. Listen to the first three episodes of this series:  – [Glacial Melting Could Change the Chemistry of Antarctic Seawater ] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/could-iron-from-melting-glaciers-affect-global-climate/) – [Penguins and Ice Samples Make This Research Vessel Paradice] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/researchers-sample-antarctic-sea-ice-amid-rapid-melting/) – [Life for Researchers on This Icebreaker Is Cold and Fulfilling] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/how-researchers-live-and-work-onboard-an-icebreaker-in-a-west-antarctic-sea/) E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter. Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by journalist Sofia Moutinho. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

12 Jul 2024

17 MINS

17:40

12 Jul 2024


#1301

Saving the Last Truly Wild Horse

Przewalski’s horses are truly wild horses, even the ones held in captivity. They traditionally roamed the Central Asian steppes, so you can imagine everyone’s surprise when two separate accounts on TikTok claimed to have found a Przewalski’s horse here in the U.S. But as guest and Scientific American associate news editor Allison Parshall will tell you, the real story is the remarkable conservation efforts that led to a resurgence for this horse, which was once considered extinct in the wild. [The Last Wild Horses Are Finally Returning to Their Natural Habitat] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/przewalskis-horses-are-finally-returning-to-their-natural-habitat/)   [How a Cloned Ferret Inspired a DNA Bank for Endangered Species ] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-a-cloned-ferret-inspired-a-dna-bank-for-endangered-species/) Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with guest and associate news editor Allison Parshall. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

10 Jul 2024

15 MINS

15:52

10 Jul 2024


#1300

A Blast from Our Past and Plans for a Petrochemical-Free Future

We’re looking at our reporting—from 100 years ago. In 1924 Scientific American’s pages were bemoaning traffic, waste management and pests. They were also praising the by-products of coal tar and those substances’ use in household items. While the record is clear on the toxicity of fossil fuels to our environment and our health, demand for fossil-fuel-based “petrochemical” products such as plastic is only increasing. Host Rachel Feltman advises on how to avoid petrochemicals in our everyday products. Plus, we take a lighthearted look at a telepathy study also featured in one of our 1924 issues.  Recommended reading: [The Gas Industry Is Gaslighting the Public about Climate Change] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-gas-industry-is-gaslighting-the-public-about-climate-change/) [Renewable Power Set to Surpass Coal Globally by 2025] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/renewable-power-set-to-surpass-coal-globally-by-2025/) E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

08 Jul 2024

08 MINS

08:33

08 Jul 2024


#1299

The Supreme Court Plays Hot Potato with Idaho’s Abortion Restrictions, and NASA Plays It Safe with S...

The Supreme Court dismissed a case about Idaho’s abortion ban, preserving a lower court ruling that allows for emergency access to abortion in the state. NASA pushed back a return flight for two Starliner astronauts so that Boeing and the agency can better understand the helium leaks and thruster failures that plagued the spacecraft’s launch.  Infectious disease experts are still tracking the transmission of bird flu in the U.S., while Finland is set to offer preemptive vaccines to farmworkers. Higher temperatures are contributing to a spike in dengue fever. A new strain of mpox is spreading in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. We’re taking the holiday week off, so there won’t be an episode on Wednesday or Friday. Enjoy your Fourth of July, stay safe around fireworks and listen to our back catalog of episodes when you need a break from backyard barbecues.  Recommended reading: [Supreme Court Allows Emergency Abortions in Idaho—For Now] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/supreme-court-blocks-idahos-total-abortion-ban-for-now/) [Mosquitoes Carry Nasty Diseases. Here’s How to Protect Yourself] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/mosquitoes-carry-nasty-diseases-heres-how-to-protect-yourself/) E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

01 Jul 2024

12 MINS

12:20

01 Jul 2024


#1298

On Thin Ice: Life Onboard an Antarctic Icebreaker (Part 3)

Life onboard the Nathaniel B. Palmer can be cramped and cold. Chaotic work schedules and changing time zones can be disorienting, and the isolation of Antarctica is hard to handle. Research, routine and a mock trial with the god of the sea help these scientists stay grounded. Stay tuned for the fourth and final episode of this Friday Fascination: researchers reflect on the emotional toll of witnessing climate change’s impact on Antarctica. E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter. Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by journalist Sofia Moutinho. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

28 Jun 2024

21 MINS

21:59

28 Jun 2024


#1297

How to Stay Cool during Record-Breaking Heat Waves

Summers are getting hotter, with heat waves that last longer and occur more often. That makes it even more important to communicate the risks of heat to vulnerable groups and keep communities and individuals cool. Sustainability editor Andrea Thompson explains why it feels hotter than ever and how to keep yourself and your community safe in the summer heat.  Recommended reading: [This Isn’t Your Grandparents’ Summer Heat] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/summers-are-hotter-than-ever-and-are-only-going-to-get-worse/) [How Some Common Medications Can Make People More Vulnerable to Heat] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-some-common-medications-can-make-people-more-vulnerable-to-heat/) E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman, with special guest Andrea Thompson. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

26 Jun 2024

17 MINS

17:51

26 Jun 2024


#1296

Your Penis Might Be Full of Microplastics, and The Seine is Definitely Full of Bacteria

Microplastics are everywhere—and we mean everywhere. These pesky plastic pollutants have been found in penis tissue, testicles, breast milk and blood. They’ve turned up in Antarctic snow, in the clouds above Mount Fuji, inside deep-sea creatures and near the top of Mount Everest. In Paris Olympic ambitions for the Seine’s are being complicated by bacteria. Far above Earth, the Starliner spacecraft faced a rocky road to the International Space Station (ISS). Starliner’s return to Earth is being delayed as Boeing and NASA officials take a look at the leaks and thruster failures that occurred during its journey to the ISS. Recommended reading: [Microplastics Linked to Heart Attack, Stroke and Death] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/microplastics-linked-to-heart-attack-stroke-and-death/) [The Physics of Breakdancing, a New Olympic Sport ] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-physics-of-breakdancing-a-new-olympic-sport/) E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

24 Jun 2024

09 MINS

09:34

24 Jun 2024


#1295

On Thin Ice: Penguins in Paradise (Part 2)

It’s important that researchers get samples of Antarctic sea ice before melting takes the opportunity away. But fieldwork is never straightforward, and in part two of our Friday Fascination series about Antarctica, journalist Sofia Moutinho and the scientists on the Nathaniel B. Palmer take a break to enjoy some adorable Adélie penguins, the smallest penguin species in the Antarctic. Stay tuned for next Friday’s episode, when we’ll learn what it’s like to live and work onboard an icebreaker in Antarctica. E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter. Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by journalist Sofia Moutinho. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

21 Jun 2024

20 MINS

20:26

21 Jun 2024


#1294

What Happens if a Nuclear Weapon Goes Off in Space?

The U.S. Department of Defense has sounded the alarm on a worrying hypothetical program from Russia aimed at putting a nuclear weapon into orbit. Associate news editor Allison Parshall explains what we know about nukes in space from a satellite accident and a series of ill-advised low-orbit tests during the cold war. E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Carin Leong, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with guest Allison Parshall. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

19 Jun 2024

14 MINS

14:37

19 Jun 2024


#1293

‘Flying’ Joro Spiders Are No Big Deal, and Starlink Satellites Are Not So Great for The Ozone Layer

This week’s news roundup features spiders, space and the Supreme Court. “Flying” [Joro spiders are making headlines] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/millions-of-joro-spiders-are-moving-up-the-east-coast-heres-what-to-expect/) , but are they really taking over the East Coast? Extreme heat leads Greece to close the Acropolis and worry about what the rest of the summer will bring. Levels of ozone-depleting hydrochlorofluorocarbons are on the decline. Plus, [satellite reentry] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/there-is-too-much-trash-in-space/) releases ozone-damaging aluminum oxide, and access to [medication abortion] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-medication-abortion-with-ru-486-mifepristone-works/) is preserved.  Recommended viewing: [The Ozone Hole Showed Humans Could Damage Earth and That We Could Heal It] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/video/the-ozone-hole-showed-humans-could-damage-earth-and-that-we-could-heal-it/) E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: subscribe to Scientific American and sign up for our daily Today in Science newsletter. Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Carin Leong, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

17 Jun 2024

11 MINS

11:31

17 Jun 2024


#1292

On Thin Ice: Supercharged Phytoplankton (Part 1)

All aboard the Nathaniel B. Palmer, a research vessel making its way through the waters of West Antarctica. Journalist Sofia Moutinho is joining a team of chemists trying to find out how glacial melting is changing ocean chemistry—and what those changes might mean for the global climate. The researchers want to know whether a negative feedback loop could take shape in Antarctica’s seas. Carbon dioxide contributes to the rise in warming that is melting the glaciers. As glacial melting releases iron, phytoplankton feast. Phytoplankton in turn remove carbon from the air, potentially causing a cooling effect. Stay tuned for next Friday’s episode, where Moutinho will embark on a hunt for sea ice and hear about the researchers’ special encounter with Adélie penguins. E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Carin Leong, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by journalist Sofia Moutinho. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

14 Jun 2024

21 MINS

21:00

14 Jun 2024


#1291

What’s Actually In Your Tattoo Ink? No One Really Knows

Nearly a third of U.S. adults have tattoos, but how many people know what's really in the ink? Despite new regulations, researchers have found many commercial inks contain unlisted and potentially harmful ingredients. John Swierk, an assistant professor of chemistry at Binghamton University, and his team are trying to figure out exactly what goes into each vial of tattoo ink—and how tattoos actually work—to help make body art safer. Email us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new everyday: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman, with guest John Swierk, assistant professor of chemistry at Binghamton University. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

12 Jun 2024

18 MINS

18:05

12 Jun 2024


#1290

Rock Samples Taken from Far Side of the Moon and a ‘Morning-After Pill’ for STIs

In this week’s news roundup, we present the latest from the skies and the pillbox. The Hubble Space Telescope is limping along, operating with [just one gyroscope] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/nasa-rejects-hubble-space-telescope-rescue-mission-and-trims-its-science/) to preserve its research capabilities. China’s Chang’e-6 lunar probe is sending back the first ever samples from the far side of the moon. Plus, there are exciting advancements in the world of pharmaceuticals, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention endorsing a “morning-after pill” for STIs and [artificial intelligence discovering potential novel antibiotics] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/ai-could-quickly-screen-thousands-of-antibiotics-to-tackle-superbugs/) . E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/) for our daily Today in Science newsletter. Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Kelso Harper, Carin Leong, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Kelso Harper. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

10 Jun 2024

09 MINS

09:32

10 Jun 2024


#1289

Do Plants ‘Think’? We Might Not Know Enough about Consciousness to be Certain

Can plants “think?" Do they “talk” to one another? These are questions that scientists are asking—and the answers might surprise you. Zoë Schlanger, climate reporter at The Atlantic, sits down with Science Quickly host Rachel Feltman to discuss her new book [The Light Eaters] (https://www.harpercollins.com/products/the-light-eaters-zoe-schlanger?variant=41096248295458) , which explores the surprising science of plant intelligence.  Related Reading: [Brains Are Not Required When It Comes to Thinking and Solving Problems—Simple Cells Can Do It] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/brains-are-not-required-when-it-comes-to-thinking-and-solving-problems-simple-cells-can-do-it/) [How Plant Intelligence Can Soothe Climate Anxiety] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-plant-intelligence-can-soothe-climate-anxiety/) Email us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new everyday: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Kelso Harper, Carin Leong Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with guest Zoë Schlanger from The Atlantic. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

07 Jun 2024

23 MINS

23:37

07 Jun 2024


#1288

Snacking on Cicadas Is Nutritious, Sustainable, and—Yes—Delicious

A “double brood” of cicadas is taking over much of the eastern half of the U.S. They’re loud and abundant. Have you considered–eating them? Chef Joseph Yoon, founder of Brooklyn Bugs, explains how to harvest and feast upon this year’s “double brood” and the many benefits of adding insects to our diet.   Related Reading: – [Periodical Cicadas Emerge Every 13 or 17 Years. How Do They Keep Track of Time?] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-do-periodical-cicadas-know-when-to-emerge) – [Can You Eat Cicadas? Can Your Dog Do So? ] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/cicadas-are-basically-safe-for-you-and-your-dog-to-eat-heres-what-to-know/) E-mail us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Kelso Harper, Carin Leong, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman, with guest Joseph Yoon of Brooklyn Bugs. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

05 Jun 2024

21 MINS

21:08

05 Jun 2024


#1287

Auroras Are on the Horizon, and Bird Flu Is on the Menu

In this week’s news roundup: Despite widespread concerns, a new study on adolescent smartphone use found that teens report improved moods when using their devices. Misleadingly framed but factually accurate stories shared on social media can drive vaccine hesitancy more effectively than outright false information. Updates on rising COVID-19 cases and the latest developments in the ongoing [bird flu outbreak] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bird-flu-detected-in-a-person-in-texas-what-we-know-so-far/) . Plus, the potential return of stunning auroral displays, thanks to upcoming solar activity.  Email us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new everyday: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Kelso Harper. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

03 Jun 2024

09 MINS

09:18

03 Jun 2024


#1286

Troubled Waters on Cape Cod: Liquid Gold (Part 3)

Cape Cod communities are facing an expensive mandate to clean up their wastewater. Urine diversion or “pee-cycling” could be a cost-effective pollution solution. In the third and final installment of our three-part Fascination series about Cape Cod’s “yellow tide,” environmental reporter Barbara Moran meets a Falmouth couple championing this unconventional approach.  You can check out more of Barbara Moran’s reporting on [Cape Cod’s water pollution] (https://www.wbur.org/news/2024/02/12/cape-cod-septic-systems-sewers-solutions-cost) , including the “ [pee-cycling] (https://www.wbur.org/news/2024/02/12/cape-cod-pee-cycling-urine-diversion-liquid-gold) ” pilot project in Falmouth. And watch WBUR and Scientific American’s [documentary short] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tegBETX6MLw) exploring how pollution and algae overgrowth threaten this Massachusetts vacation hub. Email us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for our daily newsletter.  This series is a co-production of [WBUR] (https://www.wbur.org/) and Scientific American. It’s reported and hosted by WBUR’s Barbara Moran. Science Quickly is produced by Jeff DelViscio, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Rachel Feltman. Our theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck fact-checked this series, and Duy Linh Tu and Sebastian Tuinder contributed reporting and sound. WBUR’s Kathleen Masterson edited this series. Additional funding was provided by the [Pulitzer Center] (https://pulitzercenter.org/) . Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

31 May 2024

09 MINS

09:19

31 May 2024


#1285

The Science Behind Curly Hair [Sponsored]

Research at the intersection of science and beauty is providing us with a better understanding of hair diversity. This podcast was produced for L’Oréal by Scientific American Custom Media, a division separate from the magazine’s board of editors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

30 May 2024

14 MINS

14:56

30 May 2024


#1284

How to Protect Wildlife without Leaving Home

Whether you have a large yard or a tiny planter, there are ways to use your outdoor space to protect wildlife. Senior news reporter Meghan Bartels takes us through what you can do, or stop doing, to make your yard and home friendlier to local critters.  Related Reading: – [8 Ways to Protect Wildlife Near Your Home] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/8-ways-to-protect-wildlife-near-your-home/) – [Pollinators Flock to Flower-Filled Solar Panel Fields] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/pollinators-flock-to-flower-filled-solar-panel-fields/) Email us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new every day: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with guest Meghan Bartels. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

29 May 2024

07 MINS

07:54

29 May 2024


#1283

Troubled Waters on Cape Cod: Sticker Shock (Part 2)

Cape Cod’s famed ponds and bays are suffering from pollution with a curious origin: human urine. Household septic systems are flushing nitrogen into the water, resulting in toxic algal blooms. In the second installment of our three-part Fascination series about Cape Cod’s “yellow tide,” environmental reporter Barbara Moran looks at the controversial and costly pollution solutions being considered. You can check out more of Barbara Moran’s reporting on the efforts to improve [Cape Cod’s water pollution] (https://www.wbur.org/news/2024/02/12/cape-cod-septic-systems-sewers-solutions-cost) , including a “ [pee-cycling] (https://www.wbur.org/news/2024/02/12/cape-cod-pee-cycling-urine-diversion-liquid-gold) ” project being considered by one innovative town. And watch WBUR and Scientific American’s [documentary short] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tegBETX6MLw) exploring how pollution and algae overgrowth threaten this Massachusetts vacation hub. Email us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new everyday: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for our daily newsletter.  This series is a co-production of [WBUR] (https://www.wbur.org/) and Scientific American. It’s reported and hosted by WBUR’s Barbara Moran. Science Quickly is produced by Jeff DelViscio, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Rachel Feltman. Our theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck fact-checked this series, and Duy Linh Tu and Sebastian Tuinder contributed reporting and sound. WBUR’s Kathleen Masterson edited this series. Additional funding was provided by the [Pulitzer Center] (https://pulitzercenter.org/) . Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

24 May 2024

12 MINS

12:08

24 May 2024


#1282

The Apocalypse Is Going to Be a Lot Friendlier Than You Think

Psychologist and cooperation theorist Athena Aktipis shares advice from her new book, [A Field Guide to the Apocalypse] (https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/titles/athena-aktipis/a-field-guide-to-the-apocalypse/9781523518258/?lens=workman-publishing-company) , on how to survive and thrive in doomsday scenarios from catastrophic natural disasters to zombie outbreaks.  Related Reading: – [Could the Zombie Fungus in TV’s The Last of Us Really Infect People?] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/could-the-zombie-fungus-in-tvs-the-last-of-us-really-infect-people/) – [The Evolutionary Reasons We Are Drawn to Horror] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-evolutionary-reasons-we-are-drawn-to-horror-movies-and-haunted-houses1/) Email us at [sciencequickly@sciam.com] (mailto:sciencequickly@sciam.com) if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! Discover something new everyday: [subscribe] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American and [sign up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with guest Athena Aktipis. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

22 May 2024

18 MINS

18:01

22 May 2024


#1281

AI Is Getting Creepier and Risky Cheese Is Getting Trendier

In this week's science roundup: drinking raw milk was always risky, but now there are added concerns over the spread of bird flu into dairy cows. An intense geomagnetic storm led to stunning auroras across the globe last week–and similar storms could mess with satellites and electricity infrastructure. Plus, hurricane forecasts are on the horizon. Email us at sciencequickly@sciam.com if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover! And discover something new everyday by [subscribing] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_subscribetext&utm_term=LP_subscribe_v1_s1_podcast) to Scientific American or [signing up] (https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/?utm_source=promotion&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=may24-marketing2024_signuptext&utm_term=LP_signup_v1_s1_podcast) for our daily newsletter.  Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Kelso Harper, Carin Leong, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit [megaphone.fm/adchoices] (https://megaphone.fm/adchoices) ... Read more

20 May 2024

12 MINS

12:32

20 May 2024