Physics World Weekly Podcast podcast

Physics World Weekly Podcast

Physics World Weekly offers a unique insight into the latest news, breakthroughs and innovations from the global scientific community. Our award-winning journalists reveal what has captured their imaginations about the stories in the news this week, which might span anything from quantum physics and astronomy through to materials science, environmental research and policy, and biomedical science and technology. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World website. If you enjoy what you hear, then also check out our monthly podcast Physics World Stories, which takes a more in-depth look at a specific theme.

Physics World Weekly offers a unique insight into the latest news, breakthroughs and innovations from the global scientific community. Our award-winning journalists reveal what has captured their imaginations about the stories in the news this week, which might span anything from quantum physics and astronomy through to materials science, environmental research and policy, and biomedical science and technology. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World website. If you enjoy what you hear, then also check out our monthly podcast Physics World Stories, which takes a more in-depth look at a specific theme.

 

#100

Linking silicon T centres with light offers a route to fault-tolerant quantum computing

Today’s noisy quantum processors are prone to errors that can quickly knock a quantum calculation off course. As a result, quantum error correction schemes are used to make some nascent quantum computers more tolerant to such faults. This involves using a large number of qubits – called “physical” qubits – to create one fault-tolerant “logical” qubit. A useful fault-tolerant quantum computer would have thousands of logical qubits and this would require the integration of millions of physical qubits, which remains a formidable challenge. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, I am in conversation with [Stephanie Simmons] (https://photonic.com/team/dr-stephanie-simmons/) , who is founder and chief quantum officer at [Photonic Inc] (https://photonic.com/) . The Vancouver-based company is developing optically-linked silicon spin qubits – and it has recently announced that it has distributed quantum entanglement between two of its modules. I spoke with Simmons earlier this month in London at [Commercialising Quantum Global 2024] (https://events.economist.com/commercialising-quantum/) , which was organized by Economist Impact. She explains how the company’s qubits – based on T-centre spins in silicon – are connected using telecoms-band photons. Simmons makes the case that the technology can be integrated and scaled to create fault-tolerant computers. We also chat about the company’s manufacturing programme and career opportunities for physicists at the firm. ... Read more

20 Jun 2024

31 MINS

31:00

20 Jun 2024


#99

The Kavli Prize in Astrophysics: meet the 2024 laureates David Charbonneau and Sara Seager

This episode features a wide-ranging interview with [Sara Seager] (https://physics.mit.edu/faculty/sara-seager/) and [David Charbonneau] (https://astronomy.fas.harvard.edu/people/david-charbonneau) , who share the [2024 Kavli Prize in Astrophysics] (https://www.kavliprize.org/prizes/astrophysics/2024) . Charbonneau is at Harvard University and Seager is at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and they won the prize for their discoveries of exoplanets and the characterization of their atmospheres. Exoplanets are planets that orbit stars other than the Sun. Astronomers have confirmed the existence of more than 5000 exoplanets, and that number keeps increasing. In this podcast, the two laureates talk about the astonishing range of exoplanets that have been observed and explain how astronomers study the atmospheres of these faint and distant objects. Seager and Charbonneau also talk about the search for biosignatures of life on distant exoplanets and look to the future of exoplanet astronomy. This podcast is sponsored by The Kavli Prize. ... Read more

13 Jun 2024

36 MINS

36:23

13 Jun 2024


#98

Teaching nuclear physics using data rather than models, recovering helium from party balloons

What is the best way to teach nuclear physics? Is the discipline more difficult than particle physics? What does a nuclear physicist make of the film Oppenheimer? These are just three of the questions addressed by [David Jenkins] (https://www-users.york.ac.uk/~dj4/About_Me.html) in this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast. A nuclear physicist and author based at the UK’s University of York, Jenkins is in conversation with Physics World’s Matin Durrani. Also featured in this episode is [Dale Keeping] (https://www.isis.stfc.ac.uk/Pages/Mr-Dale-Keeping.aspx) , who is helium recovery manager at the UK’s ISIS Neutron and Muon Source. He explains how helium is used at the facility; where the helium supply comes from; and how he and his colleagues manage this non-renewable resource. Keeping also chats about an outreach initiative that involves collecting used party balloons so the helium can be re-used at ISIS. ... Read more

06 Jun 2024

39 MINS

39:06

06 Jun 2024


#97

Baltimore bridge collapse: engineers explain how failures can be avoided

Earlier this year, the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the US collapsed after being struck by a large container ship. Six people were killed in the disaster and many around the world were left wondering how such an important piece of infrastructure could collapse in such a catastrophic way. We investigate in this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, which features [Erin Bell] (https://marine.unh.edu/person/erin-bell) and [Martin Wosnik] (https://ceps.unh.edu/person/martin-wosnik) . They are both engineers at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and they are in conversation with Physics World’s Margaret Harris. Bell specializes in the structural design and dynamics of bridges and she explains why the bridge collapsed and talks about what can be done to avoid future catastrophes. Wosnik is an expert in fluid flow and along with Bell, is involved in the [UNH Living Bridge Project] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvlEBkNGqiI) . They explain how the project has transformed a lift bridge into a living laboratory that investigates, among other things, how a bridge can be used to generate tidal energy. They also talk about the [Atlantic Marine Energy Center] (https://www.linkedin.com/posts/amec-us_marineenergy-blueeconomy-activity-7173716945454784516-YsGj/) , which is developing new ways to extract useful energy from the motions of the oceans. ... Read more

30 May 2024

45 MINS

45:29

30 May 2024


#96

A passion for building instrumentation, and a hint of dark matter in dwarf galaxies

In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast we chat with [Lily Ellis-Gibbings] (https://www.npl.co.uk/people/lily-ellis-gibbings) , who is a higher scientist at the UK’s [National Physical Laboratory] (https://www.npl.co.uk/) . She talks about her passion for building scientific instrumentation for fields as diverse as radiotherapy, astrochemistry and mass spectrometry. Ellis-Gibbings also shares her top tips for physics students who aspire to careers in instrumentation. Also in this episode, the astrophysicist [Alex McDaniel] (https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexrmcdaniel/) talks about a [new study of dwarf galaxies] (https://journals.aps.org/prd/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevD.109.063024) . While at [Clemson University] (https://www.clemson.edu/index.html) in the US, McDaniel and colleagues observed evidence that dark-matter particles in the galaxies are annihilating to create gamma-rays. While well below the statistical threshold to be called a discovery, the observation provides a tantalizing hint about the nature of dark matter. ![Thyracont logo] (https://physicsworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/Thyracont-logo.jpg) This podcast is sponsored by Thyracont Vacuum Instruments, which provides all types of vacuum metrology for a broad variety of applications ranging from laboratory research to coating and the semiconductor industry. Explore their sensors, handheld vacuum meters, digital and analogue transducers as well as vacuum accessories and components at [thyracont-vacuum.com] (https://thyracont-vacuum.com/) . ... Read more

23 May 2024

38 MINS

38:25

23 May 2024


#95

Celebrating attosecond science, physics tournament focuses on fun

The [2023 Nobel Prize For Physics] (https://physicsworld.com/a/pierre-agostini-ferenc-krausz-and-anne-lhuillier-win-2023-nobel-prize-for-physics/) was shared by three scientists who pioneered the use of ultrashort, attosecond laser pulses for studying the behaviour electrons in matter. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, I chat with three people involved with the [IOPP-ZJU International Symposium on Progress in Attosecond Science] (https://ioppublishing.org/researchers/iopp-zju-international-symposium-progress-in-attosecond-science/) . The event will be held on 23 May at China’s Zhejiang University and can also be attended online via Zoom. It is organized by [IOP Publishing] (https://ioppublishing.org/) (which brings you Physics World) and Zhejiang University. Joining me in a lively discussion of attosecond science are [Haiqing Lin] (https://person.zju.edu.cn/en/0022018) of Zhejiang University, [Caterina Vozzi] (https://www.udyni.eu/people/4) of Italy’s Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies and David Gevaux of the IOPP journal [Reports on Progress in Physics] (https://iopscience.iop.org/journal/0034-4885) , which is supporting the symposium. This week’s episode also features an interview with [Anthony Quinlan] (https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/profiles/undergraduate/physics-aq) , who was a two-time contestant in the [PLANCKS] (https://plancks.uk/) international theoretical physics competition for students. He now helps organize the event, the finals of which will be held in Dublin next week. Quinlan chats with Physics World’s Katherine Skipper about competition, which involves teams of undergraduate and masters’ students solving “fun” physics problems. Quinlan explains that contestants are encouraged to come up with creative solutions – which sometimes leads to unexpected paths to the correct answer. ... Read more

16 May 2024

39 MINS

39:18

16 May 2024


#94

Artificial intelligence: developing useful tools that scientists can trust

Artificial intelligence (AI) is used just about everywhere these days and scientific research is no exception. But how can physicists best use the rapidly-changing technology – and how can they be confident in the results AI delivers? This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features a conversation with [Rick Stevens] (https://www.anl.gov/profile/rick-l-stevens) , who is a cofounder of the [Trillion Parameter Consortium] (https://tpc.dev/) , which is developing AI systems for use in science, engineering, medicine and other fields. Stevens is a computer scientist at the Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago in the US and he explains how AI can help with a wide range of tasks done by scientific researchers. ---In a previous episode of Physics World Weekly, the academic physicist Matt Hodgson [explained how he uses AI in his professional life] (https://physicsworld.com/a/the-chatbot-revolution-how-physicists-are-using-large-language-models-in-academia/) . ... Read more

09 May 2024

26 MINS

26:05

09 May 2024


#93

Social media: making it work for physics-related businesses

Many physicists work for small-to-medium-sized companies that provide scientific instrumentation and services – and some have founded companies of their own. Such businesses can have limited resources for marketing and customer service, so using social media can be an efficient way to connect with existing users and attract new customers. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Alex Peroff and Neil Spinner of [Pine Research Instrumentation] (https://pineresearch.com/) explain how they use social media – including [podcasts] (https://open.spotify.com/show/3Vdn4BLnGc27FDBhF6Iaxs) , [videos] (https://www.youtube.com/@Pineresearch/videos) , [webinars] (https://pineresearch.com/webinar-registration/) and [live chats] (https://www.youtube.com/@Pineresearch/streams) – to get their message out. From their base in Durham, North Carolina, the duo also share their top tips for getting the most out of social media. ![Thyracont logo] (https://physicsworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/Thyracont-logo.jpg) This podcast is sponsored by Thyracont Vacuum Instruments, which provides all types of vacuum metrology for a broad variety of applications ranging from laboratory research to coating and the semiconductor industry. Explore their sensors, handheld vacuum meters, digital and analogue transducers as well as vacuum accessories and components at [thyracont-vacuum.com] (https://thyracont-vacuum.com/) . ... Read more

02 May 2024

41 MINS

41:17

02 May 2024


#92

Environmental sustainability: exploring the challenges for the medical physics community

This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast explores how the medical physics community is embracing environmental sustainability. Our guests are the medical physicists [Rob Chuter] (https://www.linkedin.com/in/robchuter/?originalSubdomain=uk) of the Christie NHS Foundation Trust in the UK and [Kari Tanderup] (https://www.au.dk/en/ktan@clin.au.dk) of Aarhus University in Denmark. They chat with Physics World’s Tami Freeman about the environmental impact of healthcare provision – and how the community can reduce its carbon footprint without having negative impacts on health outcomes. ---This podcast was created in collaboration with [IPEM] (https://www.ipem.ac.uk/) , the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. IPEM owns the journal [Physics in Medicine & Biology] (https://iopscience.iop.org/journal/0031-9155) . ... Read more

25 Apr 2024

31 MINS

31:55

25 Apr 2024


#91

Purpose-Led Publishing: Antonia Seymour outlines the role of not-for-profit publishers

[Purpose-Led Publishing] (https://www.purposeledpublishing.org/) is a coalition of three not-for-profit scientific publishers: [IOP Publishing] (https://ioppublishing.org/) , [AIP Publishing] (https://publishing.aip.org/) and the [American Physical Society] (https://www.aps.org/) . The coalition launched earlier this year, and its members have promised that they will continue to reinvest 100% of their funds back into science. Members have also pledged to “publish only the content that genuinely adds to scientific knowledge,” and have also promised to “put research integrity ahead of profit”. This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features an interview with Antonia Seymour, who is chief executive of IOP Publishing. She played an important role in the creation of Purpose-Led Publishing and argues that scientists, science and society all benefit when physicists publish in not-for-profit journals. Audio engagement Also in this episode, we meet Corragh-May White who is surveying podcast listeners to try to work out the best ways for using audio to get people engaged in science. She is doing a master’s degree in science communication at the University of the West of England and is making short science podcasts in different styles for her subjects to listen to. If you would like to take part in the 20-minute survey, you can contact White at [Corragh2.White@live.uwe.ac.uk] (mailto:Corragh2.White@live.uwe.ac.uk) for more information. ... Read more

18 Apr 2024

29 MINS

29:53

18 Apr 2024


#90

Statistical physics provides powerful insights into the living world

This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features an interview with [Tannie Liverpool] (https://people.maths.bris.ac.uk/~matbl/) , who uses statistical physics to explore outstanding questions in biology. Based at the UK’s University of Bristol, where he is professor of theoretical physics, Liverpool explains how complex biological behaviours can be described at a very fundamental level using statistical physics. He chats with Physics World’s Katherine Skipper about own research into cells and tissues, including the mathematics of wound healing. Liverpool also explains how physicists, materials scientists and mathematicians working in other fields are being inspired by the statistical physics of life. Celebrating all things quantum This Sunday, 14 April is World Quantum Day and in the podcast we take a brief look at how Physics World and IOP Publishing are celebrating. You can find out more at this [IOPscience Quantum Science Subject Collection] (https://iopscience.iop.org/page/quantum-science?utm_campaign=WQD2024&utm_medium=pw&utm_source=landing_page) and on [Physics World’s ] (https://physicsworld.com/c/quantum/) [quantum page] (https://physicsworld.com/c/quantum/) . Looking further into the future, on 2 July the first instalment of [Physics World Live] (https://physicsworld.com/p/physics-world-live/) will look at the burgeoning field of quantum sensors.  This live online panel debate will feature leading experts in quantum sensors. [Register here] (https://comms.ioppublishing.org/k/Iop/phyics_world_live_registration) to take part and put your questions to the panellists. ... Read more

11 Apr 2024

26 MINS

26:53

11 Apr 2024


#89

Science centres inspire scientific literacy and diversity in STEM

In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast I am in conversation with [Frederic Bertley] (https://www.fredericbertley.com/) – who is president and CEO of [COSI] (https://cosi.org/) (Center of Science and Industry) in Columbus, Ohio. Bertley explains how science centres like COSI can boost scientific literacy and talks about the [Color of Science] (https://cosi.org/MOBILEAPP/color-of-science.php) initiative, which he founded to highlight and promote diversity in science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics. Bertley also talks about his life-long love of ice hockey and how sports can be used to get people interested in science. Indeed, he explains in detail the physics of baseball pitches and the hockey slapshot. He also talks about how COSI is encouraging Ohioans to observe and understand the total eclipse of the Sun, which will occur in a significant portion of the state on 8 April. He explains how COSI will engage with the public in venues as diverse as libraries and bars to share the science surrounding the eclipse. ... Read more

04 Apr 2024

29 MINS

29:28

04 Apr 2024


#88

Superfluid helium: the quantum curiosity behind huge experiments like the LHC

The effects of quantum mechanics are all around us, but the quantum properties of matter are generally only apparent at the microscopic level. Superfluidity is an exception, and some of its bizarre characteristics can be seen with the naked eye. What is more, superfluid helium II has found several important applications in science and technology – and is used multi-tonne quantities today at facilities like the Large Hadron Collider. My guest in this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast is [John Weisend] (https://www.staff.lu.se/lucat/user/e6111626e26c5c016fe5a14c79cbfb39) who is senior accelerator engineer at the European Spallation Source and adjunct professor at Lund University in Sweden. He is a specialist in cryogenic engineering, and has written the book [Superfluid: How a Quantum Fluid Revolutionized Modern Science] (https://physicsworld.com/a/superfluidity-the-mysterious-quantum-effect-that-became-a-backbone-of-experimental-physics/) . We chat about the physics behind this amazing substance and how it is used in some of biggest physics experiments on the planet. ![Sponsor logo] (https://physicsworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/Sponsor-logo.jpg) This episode is sponsored by [Pfeiffer Vacuum] (https://www.pfeiffer-vacuum.com/en/) . Pfeiffer Vacuum provides all types of vacuum equipment, including hybrid and magnetically-levitated turbopumps, leak detectors and analysis equipment, as well as vacuum chambers and systems. You can explore all of its products on the [Pfeiffer Vacuum website] (https://www.pfeiffer-vacuum.com/en/) . ... Read more

28 Mar 2024

35 MINS

35:59

28 Mar 2024


#87

Frugal approach to computer modelling can reduce carbon emissions

As computing power continues to grow, theoretical physicists have been able to do larger and more complicated simulations. Running these models consumes a growing amount of energy, and for the time being, this results in more greenhouse-gas emissions that contribute to climate change. Indeed, doing an intensive supercomputer simulation can result in emissions that are on par with taking a long-haul flight. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, [Alejandro Gaita] (https://www.uv.es/gaita/about.html) and [Gerliz Gutiérrez ] (https://www.icmol.es/rtmm/)  of Spain’s University of Valencia tell Physics World’s Margaret Harris how the physics community can reduce its computing-related carbon emissions. Gaita and Gutiérrez are theoretical materials physicists and they argue that scientists should take a frugal approach to computer modelling, which can achieve scientifically relevant results while minimizing energy consumption. ---Gaita and Gutiérrez describe practical examples of frugal computing in this article, which was co-written by Valencia’s [Aman Ullah] (http://www.molmattc.com/portal/index.php/members) : “ [A call for frugal modelling: two case studies involving molecular spin dynamics] (https://arxiv.org/abs/2401.13618) ”. ... Read more

21 Mar 2024

27 MINS

27:05

21 Mar 2024


#86

Keith Burnett: IOP president says it is our duty to make physics more inclusive

This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features a wide ranging interview with [Keith Burnett] (https://www.iop.org/about/governance/council/keith-burnett) , who is president of the [Institute of Physics] (https://www.iop.org/) (IOP). The IOP is the professional body and learned society for physics in the UK and Ireland. It represents 21,000 members and a key goal of the institute is to make physics accessible to people from all backgrounds. Burnett, who is halfway through his two-year term in office, was knighted in 2013 for his services to science and higher education. He has served as vice chancellor of the University of Sheffield and is also an advocate for high-quality vocational education and technician training. He talks to Physics World’s Matin Durrani about the challenges facing universities; physicists as entrepreneurs; supporting early-career physicists; and the need for the IOP to continue its drive to boost the diversity of the physics community. ---The Institute of Physics owns IOP Publishing, which brings you Physics World Image courtesy of Hannah Veale ... Read more

15 Mar 2024

34 MINS

34:59

15 Mar 2024


#85

Tackling climate change while improving human wellbeing

Environmental challenges like climate change are forcing us to rethink how we live in cities. This provides humanity with an important opportunity to develop new policies that also improve the overall wellbeing of urban dwellers. Our guest in this episode of Physics World Weekly podcast is [Radhika Khosla] (https://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/people/radhika-khosla/) – who is an urban climatologist based at the Oxford Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment at the UK’s University of Oxford. She points out that extreme heat is proving to be the most deadly consequence of climate change and talks about the need to develop and implement cooling technologies that do not boost greenhouse gas emissions. Khosla explains why the rapid urbanization of India offers opportunities to develop environmental policies that improve people’s lives. She also talks about her plans for the journal [Environmental Research Letters] (https://iopscience.iop.org/journal/1748-9326) , where she has recently become editor-in-chief. ... Read more

07 Mar 2024

17 MINS

17:02

07 Mar 2024


#84

Radiology societies call for critical evaluation of AI, building the UK’s quantum workforce

Artificial intelligence (AI) shows great promise for use in radiology, which involves the use of medical imaging to diagnose and treat disease. Integrating AI tools into radiology could advance the diagnosis, quantification and management of multiple medical conditions. However, it is essential to acknowledge that some AI products may be add little value or even have potential to cause harm. To ensure that AI is used appropriately, five radiology societies in the US, Canada, Europe, Australia and New Zealand have come together to publish a [joint statement] (https://www.jacr.org/article/S1546-1440(23)01020-7/fulltext) on the development and use of AI tools in radiology. This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features an interview with one of the authors of this paper. [Bibb Allen] (https://birminghamradiologicalgroup.com/radiologists/bibb-allen-md/) is Chief Medical Officer for the American College of Radiology Data Science Institute, and a diagnostic radiologist at Grandview Medical Center in Birmingham, Alabama. Also in this episode, Physics World’s Katherine Skipper reports back from a [workshop] (https://physicsworld.com/a/are-we-ready-for-the-quantum-economy/) that looked at how the UK could boost its quantum workforce. ... Read more

29 Feb 2024

28 MINS

28:39

29 Feb 2024


#83

Looking to the future of US particle physics: P5 member Abigail Vieregg is our guest

Late last year the [Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel] (https://physicsworld.com/a/influential-us-particle-physics-panel-calls-for-muon-collider-development/) ( P5) released a report that looks to the future of particle physics in the United States. The report is called Exploring the Quantum Universe and one of its authors, [Abigail Vieregg] (https://physics.uchicago.edu/people/profile/abigail-vieregg/) , is our guest in this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast. Vieregg is an astrophysicist and cosmologist at the University of Chicago and she talks about future experiments that P5 has recommended including a muon collider that could search for new physics on a much smaller footprint than conventional colliders. Vieregg also chats about the proposed CMB-S4 next-generation cosmic microwave background observatory, which ties-in with her research on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. Vieregg also describes the buzz surrounding P5 meetings as the panel was presented with a wealth of ideas from the particle-physics community. She says that she is proud of the positive response P5 has garnered from physicists. ... Read more

22 Feb 2024

39 MINS

39:43

22 Feb 2024


#82

Bionic jellyfish and more efficient windfarms: a conversation with John Dabiri

Jellyfish have a very simple, yet very effective way of swimming – and this has attracted the attention of the aeronautics engineer [John Dabiri] (https://dabirilab.com/dabiri) at the California Institute of Technology. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Dabiri talks about his work on the artificial enhancement of jellyfish. He also explains how fluid dynamics can be used to boost the efficiency of windfarms, and explores the possibility that swimming organisms play important role in the mixing of the oceans. Dabiri and Caltech’s [Simon Anuszczyk] (https://www.galcit.caltech.edu/people/sanuszcz) describe their bionic jellyfish in a paper that has been accepted for publication in the journal [Bioinspiration & Biomimetics] (https://iopscience.iop.org/journal/1748-3190) . The accepted manuscript can be read here: “ [Electromechanical enhancement of live jellyfish for ocean exploration] (https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-3190/ad277f) ”. ... Read more

15 Feb 2024

25 MINS

25:08

15 Feb 2024


#81

Graphene-based materials show great promise for hydrogen transport and storage

Hydrogen can be used as a carbon-free source of energy in a wide range of applications including home heating, transportation and industry. However, there are significant challenges that must be overcome to ensure the safe and efficient storage and transportation of the gas. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, the materials expert [Krzysztof Koziol] (https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/centres/composites-and-advanced-materials-centre) explains why he is developing graphene-based materials and polymers to facilitate a hydrogen economy. Based at the UK’s Cranfield University, he chats about how existing national infrastructure for distributing natural gas can be retrofitted to safely carry hydrogen. Koziol also talks about his collaboration with Airbus to develop a cryogenic storage system that could lead to hydrogen-powered aircraft. ... Read more

08 Feb 2024

36 MINS

36:19

08 Feb 2024