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New Scientist Weekly podcast

New Scientist Weekly

Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace. Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information.

Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace. Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information.

 

#165

#165 Water dowsing to detect leaks; Astroforge going asteroid mining; AI discovers new bacteria-kill...

An ancient and debunked method of searching for water leaks is still being used by some of the UK’s water companies. The team finds out [why water dowsing is still in practice, despite being scientifically discredited] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2356376-two-of-the-uks-water-companies-are-still-using-dowsing-to-find-leaks/) . But they also find out how it might actually work - just not in the way you think. People have sometimes complained that the chimps in the various Planet of the Apes films have unrealistic eyes - because they have whites around the iris, like humans. But it turns out real chimps actually do have whites too. We thought this white sclera was only a human thing - but as Rowan finds out, we were wrong. An artificial intelligence called ProGen [has designed bacteria-killing synthetic proteins] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2356597-ai-has-designed-bacteria-killing-proteins-from-scratch-and-they-work/) , some of which actually work when inserted into cells. The team suggests this is a “short-cut to evolution” and is very promising for the development of new antibiotics. [Asteroid mining] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23931910-400-nasas-deep-space-mission-to-a-10-quintillion-all-metal-world/) tech is being tested in space in April by satellite construction company AstroForge. Rowan speaks with their co-founder to hear what they’re hoping to achieve, and discusses the company’s second mission planned for later this year, when they’ll be doing a flyby of a near-Earth asteroid to look for platinum. If you look up at the sky you may just see a rare green comet flying by. [Comet C/2022 only heads this way every 50,000 years] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2356263-rare-green-comet-c-2022-e3-is-about-to-make-its-closest-pass-by-earth/) , so the team explains how you can seize the opportunity to see it for yourself. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Matt Sparkes, Abby Beal and Karmela Padavic-Callaghan. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: January sale: [newscientist.com/jansale2023] (http://newscientist.com/jansale2023) Secrets of the Large Hadron Collider event: [newscientist.com/lhc] (http://newscientist.com/lhc) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

02 Feb 2023

24 MINS

24:59

02 Feb 2023


#164

#164 The Last of Us: the science of a fungal zombie apocalypse

The new HBO series The Last of Us is making waves, raking in a steady stream of high reviews. Based on a game of the same name, it’s set in a world where a [parasitic fungus called Cordyceps] (https://t.co/mTYN4LLTGb) has mutated to infect and zombify humans. In this bonus episode of the podcast, Bethan Ackerley asks if this could actually happen in real life. She’s joined by fungal pathogens expert Professor Matthew Fisher of Imperial College London. To read about these subjects, [Beth’s review of The Last of Us] (https://t.co/8Z3uF8xSII) , and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

30 Jan 2023

18 MINS

18:35

30 Jan 2023


#163

#163 Antidepressants; Exoplanets; California’s megadroughts – the latest news in science

A vaccine for the respiratory virus RSV may be ready this year. In fact, after decades of efforts, successful vaccines have arrived like buses, with three of them on the way. As a particularly devastating virus for young children and the elderly, [the team explains just how impactful these new vaccines will be] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2356151-the-first-ever-vaccine-against-rsv-could-be-approved-in-2023/) . You may have read headlines that Earth’s core is changing direction - but the team explains why [ it’s not all it’s cracked up to be] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2355859-earthquakes-suggest-earths-core-has-started-spinning-more-slowly/) . They also bring less-than-thrilling news for the existence of life in the universe, as [ we may have been overestimating how many planets are out there that have the right conditions for life] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2355642-up-to-74-of-planets-in-the-habitable-zone-may-not-be-good-for-life/) . Following intense rainfall, floods and disaster declarations, California finally has a dry forecast. But, the team asks, [has all this water helped ease the State’s worst-in-a-century drought] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2355697-california-storms-didnt-solve-the-states-drought-and-water-crisis/) ? And will we see more of these dramatic swings in weather as climate change worsens? Science has shown what most people who take antidepressants already know - that [they blunt both bad and good emotions] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2355756-why-antidepressants-can-blunt-both-negative-and-positive-emotions/) . The team explores the implications of this new study. You may be noticing a few bonus episodes popping up in your feed lately. The team shares a teaser of the latest ones, including a discussion about ‘tipping points’ with climate scientist Tim Lenton, and a chat with fungal pathogen expert Mat Fisher about the new fungal horror TV show The Last of Us. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, James Dinneen, Michael Le Page and Leah Crane. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: January sale: [newscientist.com/jansale2023] (http://newscientist.com/jansale2023) RSC new publishing platform [rsc.li/books] (http://rsc.li/books) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

26 Jan 2023

22 MINS

22:46

26 Jan 2023


#162

#162 How to trigger positive tipping points to tackle climate change

On this special episode of the show, host [Rowan Hooper] (https://twitter.com/rowhoop) and environment reporter Madeleine Cuff chat with climate scientist Tim Lenton of the University of Exeter. Tim has just contributed to a research paper that suggested [governments could trigger a mass shift to plant-based diets, simply by serving more vegan burgers in schools and hospitals] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2355616-serve-vegan-burgers-in-schools-to-trigger-shift-from-meat-says-report/) . We discuss with Tim the power of leveraging so-called positive tipping points to bring about large-scale change. Topics in a wide-ranging and fascinating discussion include: [green hydrogen] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg24933200-400-a-hydrogen-fuel-revolution-is-coming-heres-why-we-might-not-want-it/) , better [fuel for ships] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25233620-900-how-to-slash-the-shipping-industrys-enormous-carbon-emissions/) , [James Lovelock] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg24332401-000-james-lovelock-at-100-the-creator-of-gaia-theory-on-humanitys-future/) and [negative tipping points] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2337002-six-climate-tipping-points-are-likely-to-occur-if-we-breach-1-5c-goal/) . These are processes such as the [drying of the Amazon rainforest] (https://www.newscientist.com/podcasts/109-ukraine-war-stokes-energy-crisis-emergency-sounded-over-amazon-rainforest-secular-intelligent-design-mammalian-virgin-birth/) or the melting of the Western Antarctic ice shelf, that, if triggered, would become irreversible and self-perpetuating and that would certainly speed up climate change. One such tipping point that Tim highlights is the [Atlantic ocean conveyor belt] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23931890-100-extreme-heat-why-its-origins-could-lie-deep-in-the-atlantic/) , and in particular, the deep convection in the Labrador Sea. If the tipping point for this is reached, and models suggest it could happen at the warming we are now seeing, then Europe would shift to a far more seasonal climate, with extremes in both winter and summer. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

25 Jan 2023

27 MINS

27:09

25 Jan 2023


#161

#161 What they don’t tell you about the climate crisis with Assaad Razzouk

In this bonus episode of the podcast, hear Rowan Hooper’s extended interview with Assaad Razzouk, author of Saving the Planet Without the Bullshit: What they don’t tell you about the climate crisis. For a refreshing take on the climate crisis, find out why Assaad believes we need to feel less guilty about our personal actions when it comes to tackling climate change. In this episode he argues things like going vegan and flying less are just distractions, and explains where he believes the real battle lies. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

23 Jan 2023

19 MINS

19:05

23 Jan 2023


#160

#160 Rejuvenation treatments; world to breach 1.5 degrees of global heating

A cure for ageing, without the price-tag? It might sound too good to be true, but the team digs into [new evidence that shows low-frequency ultrasound may rejuvenate cells in our body which are thought to cause age-related diseases] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2354698-a-blast-of-ultrasound-waves-could-rejuvenate-ageing-cells/) . Our galaxy, [the Milky Way, is missing half of its matter] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2354280-the-milky-way-seems-to-be-missing-nearly-half-of-its-regular-matter/) - and the team asks where it’s all gone. They also discuss NASA’s ShadowCam which has taken pictures of Shackleton Crater on the south pole of the Moon, a region of particular interest if humans are to settle on the Lunar surface. Despite dramatic heat waves over the past few years, the Earth has actually been in a cooling period, known as La Niña, for the last three years. So with an El Niño on the way - a period of warming - the team finds out about the coming climate impacts, and how [we might breach 1.5 degrees of global heating.] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2354824-the-first-breach-of-1-5c-will-be-a-temporary-but-devastating-failure/) [Oyster mushrooms eat nematodes] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2355065-oyster-mushroom-fungus-uses-nerve-gas-to-paralyse-and-eat-tiny-worms/) - who knew? And as the team finds out, they even do it in a pretty gruesome way, using a sort of nerve gas. The question is, can they still be considered vegan? For a unique take on the climate crisis and the personal responsibility we feel in tackling it, Rowan chats to [Assaad Razzouk] (https://twitter.com/AssaadRazzouk) , author of Saving the Planet Without the Bullshit: What They Don't Tell You About the Climate Crisis. He explains why we shouldn’t worry about going vegan or cutting down on flying, and reveals the real things we should be angry about when it comes to climate change. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Madeleine Cuff, Michael Le Page and Leah Crane. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: [newscientist.com/tours] (http://newscientist.com/tours) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

19 Jan 2023

26 MINS

26:55

19 Jan 2023


#159

#159 Aboriginal stories describe ancient climate change and sea level rise in Australia

In this bonus episode of the podcast, hear an extended interview with Cassie Lynch, a descendent of the Noongar people of south west Australia who’s been studying their storytelling tradition. Find out how ancient accounts of rising sea levels from the end of the ice age around 7000 years ago have been passed down through aboriginal stories. And discover what we can learn from the events of the past in surviving the current climate crisis. Interviewing Cassie is writer and theatre maker David Finnigan. Find out more about the study by Patrick Nunn and Nicholas Reid [here] (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00049182.2015.1077539) . To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

16 Jan 2023

18 MINS

18:57

16 Jan 2023


#158

#158 Exxon’s 1970s predictions for climate change were super accurate

Scientists working for oil giant Exxon between 1977 and 2003 accurately predicted the pace and scale of climate change and warned of the harm of burning fossil fuels, while firm’s executives played down the risk. Now Exxon’s quantitative climate projections have been assessed for the first time. On this special episode of the podcast, host Rowan Hooper discusses the Exxon science with New Scientist environment reporter Madeleine Cuff, and climate scientist [Peter Stott] (https://www.newscientist.com/podcasts/111-antarctic-and-arctic-record-breaking-heat-octopus-brains-insight-black-hole-paradox-explained/) . Peter is the author of [ Hot Air, The Inside Story of the Battle Against Climate Change Denial] (https://atlantic-books.co.uk/book/hot-air/) and is a specialist in [climate attribution] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2326163-every-heatwave-occurring-today-is-more-intense-due-to-climate-change/) at the UK Met Office’s Hadley Centre. There is also a contribution from climate scientist Michael Mann. The panel discuss ExxonMobil’s response to the new study, and talk about what we can take from it in terms of not being beguiled by vested interests when pushing for a fast transition to a world free from fossil fuels. The team also reacts to the news that the head of one of the world's biggest oil companies will be president of the COP28 climate summit later this year. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

12 Jan 2023

17 MINS

17:01

12 Jan 2023


#157

#157 Computer lawyer takes first court case; brains speed up with age

Will artificial intelligence replace lawyers in the future? The team learns about [a new, chat-bot style bit of tech that fights your legal battles for you] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2351893-ai-legal-assistant-will-help-defendant-fight-a-speeding-case-in-court/) , and is about to be tested in a real court room. But is it ethical, or even legal? Gibbons love to sing, but what we’ve just learnt is [male and female gibbons also enjoy belting out synchronised musical duets] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2354278-male-and-female-gibbons-sing-duets-in-time-with-each-other/) . The team plays some of these delightful sounds, and finds out what this tells us about the evolution of rhythmic capabilities in humans. There’s good news for those of us who are getting on a bit. The team finds out about the very welcome news that [some parts of our brains actually speed up when we age] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2353871-some-regions-of-your-brain-can-communicate-faster-as-you-age/) . Wind turbines today are already pretty massive - some as high as 250 metres tall. But [a new type of turbine has been dreamt up that would rival the tallest skyscrapers] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2353743-supersized-wind-turbine-could-weather-storms-by-bending-like-palm-tree/) . The team discusses the type of engineering that will go into this mega wind turbine, if its inventor can find the $1 billion needed to fund its creation. Stories passed down through aboriginal cultures may provide a roadmap on how to survive the current climate crisis. The [writer and theatre-maker] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2340345-youre-safe-til-2024-deep-history-is-about-humanitys-turning-points/) [David Finnigan] (https://www.newscientist.com/podcasts/136-a-step-towards-building-artificial-life-solar-powered-slugs/) speaks to [Cassie Lynch] (https://casslynch.com.au/about/) , a descendant of the Noongar people of Australia, who’s been studying their storytelling tradition. She reveals ancient knowledge from thousands of years ago, usually only shared among indigenous people. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Madeleine Cuff and Matt Sparkes. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: [newscientist.com/lhc] (http://newscientist.com/lhc) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

12 Jan 2023

25 MINS

25:04

12 Jan 2023


#156

#156: What you need to know in science and culture for 2023

To see in the New Year, host Rowan Hooper and the team look ahead to their science and cultural highlights for the coming months. We start with 2 big planetary science missions due for launch in 2023. [JUICE, which will be visiting Jupiter to study some of its moons, and Psyche] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25634192-800-spacecraft-are-heading-to-a-metal-asteroid-and-jupiters-moons-in-2023/) , which is making a journey to [an asteroid made completely of iron] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23931910-400-nasas-deep-space-mission-to-a-10-quintillion-all-metal-world/) . With covid still causing a huge burden of disease around the world, [we find out how treatment of the disease is set to evolve this year] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25634192-400-why-we-probably-wont-get-new-covid-19-vaccines-in-2023/) , and what we can expect from the development of new vaccines. 2023 also looks to be [the year of deep-sea mining] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2351934-time-is-running-out-for-countries-to-agree-rules-on-deep-sea-mining/) , as we search for more minerals to fuel the green-revolution. But will countries regulate the industry in time, before it turns into a new wild west? And the team explains how our understanding of pregnancy and the earliest stages of life is set to change this year thanks to [work that will accelerate the creation of synthetic embryos] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2352925-synthetic-reproductive-cells-will-help-us-understand-fertility-in-2023/) . In cultural news, the team looks ahead to an exciting roster of new books coming out this year, including The Terraformers by Annalee Newitz, In Ascension by Martin MacInnes, Saving Time by Jenny Odell, and Breathe: Tackling the Climate Emergency by Sadiq Khan. In film and TV they discuss Christopher Nolan’s Oppenheimer, Dune Part 2, Ant-Man and The Wasp: Quantumania, and the TV adaptation of Bonnie Garmus’ Lessons In Chemistry. There is particular anticipation for the Netflix adaptation of [Cixin Liu’s extraordinary book, The Three-Body Problem] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23931940-500-exclusive-chinese-sci-fi-genius-cixin-liu-on-humanitys-deadly-future/) . On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Alison Flood, Madeleine Cuff, Jason Murugesu, Michael Le Page and Leah Crane. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: [newscientist.com/arcticevent] (http://newscientist.com/arcticevent) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

05 Jan 2023

26 MINS

26:14

05 Jan 2023


#155

#155: Our five favourite New Scientist long-reads from 2022

A holiday special of the podcast and a free-gift giveaway this week, as we celebrate five of New Scientist’s best front-page features of 2022. As well as discussing the features and why they chose to tackle them, the team chats about the beautiful cover artwork for each story. First up is the news that AI is helping to decode the lost stories of ancient Mesopotamia, [revealing the secrets of ancient cuneiform texts] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25533981-400-how-the-secrets-of-ancient-cuneiform-texts-are-being-revealed-by-ai/) - the world’s first known writing. Next are the blips recorded by [the Large Hadron Collider which have hinted at a potential new force of nature ] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25333693-200-the-large-hadron-collider-blips-that-could-herald-a-new-era-of-physics/) - a discovery which could change physics forever. The most popular feature story of the year was ‘ [The Longevity Diet: How knowing what to eat and when can help you stay young] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25533930-400-a-longevity-diet-that-hacks-cell-ageing-could-add-years-to-your-life/) ’. Real news-you-can-use, this feature highlights a new research-based diet that could increase your life expectancy by up to 20 years. If you’ve ever struggled with insomnia, you’ll want to read our feature on its causes, which shows that [ the sleep disorder is now a solvable problem] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2339328-we-are-finally-waking-up-to-the-causes-of-insomnia-and-how-to-treat-it/) . And finally is a story which asks, [is there a place for consciousness in our understanding of the universe] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25433802-500-a-new-place-for-consciousness-in-our-understanding-of-the-universe/) ? The team explains the idea that physics needs to embrace subjective experience in order to fully describe and explain the universe. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Cat de Lange, Dan Cossins and Alison George. These premium features are usually only available to subscribers, but as a holiday gift they’ll be free to read from the 25th December to the end of the year. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

25 Dec 2022

26 MINS

26:42

25 Dec 2022


#154

#154: News review 2022 - stand-out moments and funniest stories

Recorded live online for New Scientist subscribers, in this holiday special the team takes you through their stand out moments of the year, the funniest stories to hit the headlines, and their hopes for 2023 - and they answer questions from the audience too. For stand-out highlights of 2022, the team discusses [ Deepmind and its transformative AI AlphaFold which predicted the structures of most known proteins] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2331479-alphafold-why-deepminds-protein-folding-ai-is-transformational/) . They celebrate the successes of the [ James Webb Space Telescope] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25634175-600-jwst-captured-the-most-thrilling-and-inspiring-space-images-of-2022/) and a recent [nuclear fusion experiment] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25634175-700-unlimited-energy-from-fusion-became-a-more-feasible-prospect-in-2022/) that has, for the first time ever, generated more power than it requires to run. They also chat about [advances in organ transplants] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2304167-how-a-pig-heart-was-transplanted-into-a-human-for-the-first-time/) and the amazing discovery of ants which have evolved the ability to [treat the wounds of their nest mates] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2319163-ants-treat-infected-wounds-of-nestmates-with-medicine-from-their-back/) . For their funniest picks of the year, they highlight the story of a fish that evolved to stand up on land then thought “nah”, and went back to living in water. Then there’s the news of researchers who wanted to find out if [covid-related loss of smell correlated with negative reviews of scented candles on Amazon] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2325854-amazon-reviews-saying-candles-are-scentless-may-signal-covid-19-cases/) . And they discuss North America’s [ invasion by alien earthworms] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2327020-alien-earthworms-have-spread-to-almost-all-parts-of-north-america/) . After audience questions, the team looks to the future. From the scientific discoveries spurred on by the covid pandemic, to developments in quantum computing, new innovative ways of producing food in more environmentally friendly ways, advancements in gene replacement therapies and the future of space travel, they discuss the stories they’re most looking forward to next year. On the panel are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Alexandra Thompson, Anna Demming and Sam Wong. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: Climeworks: [www.climeworks.com] (http://www.climeworks.com) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

21 Dec 2022

30 MINS

30:39

21 Dec 2022


#153

#153: Fusion breakthrough; COP15 report; Shakespeare and climate change

There’s been an exciting breakthrough in nuclear fusion. [For the first time on Earth, a controlled fusion reaction has generated more power than it requires to run] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2350965-nuclear-fusion-researchers-have-achieved-historic-energy-milestone/) , bringing us closer than ever before to a viable way of producing clean energy for the world. So, what’s the catch? The team finds out. The New Scientist team reports from a worryingly quiet COP15. It’s hoped the biodiversity conference will be an opportunity to set ambitious global goals for nature, to reach the goal of restoring it by 2030. But with a distinct lack of world leaders in attendance, [can this vital conference deliver] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2351518-cop15-rich-countries-announce-alliance-to-make-mineral-mining-green/) ? [We now know how to spot alien spacecraft whizzing through space at warp speed] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2350874-ligo-may-be-able-to-detect-alien-warp-drives-using-gravitational-waves/) …assuming some advanced civilisation has figured out how to stretch the fabric of spacetime of course. The team finds out about this new research which involves LIGO and gravitational waves. Shakespeare lived through an intense period of deforestation and climate change, and he referenced a lot of this in his work. Think back to Titania’s speech in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” about the changing seasons, and when Gloucester in Henry IV part 2 says “the seasons have changed their manners”. Shakespeare even described the energy transition from wood to coal as a fuel source. Rowan chats with Shakespearean scholar Randall Martin from the University of New Brunswick in Canada, and auditions for the part of Queen of the Fairies. Acclaimed science fiction author Adrian Tchaikovsky discusses his latest book, Children of Memory, the story of a fragile human colony on a far flung outpost – and some corvids, which may or may not be sentient. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Matt Sparkes, Madeleine Cuff, James Dinneen and Alison Flood. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: Print-only deal: [newscientist.com/printsale] (http://newscientist.com/printsale) Climeworks: [www.climeworks.com] (http://www.climeworks.com) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

15 Dec 2022

33 MINS

33:33

15 Dec 2022


#152

#152 Ancient species of human could control fire; complete brain map of fly

An extinct species of ancient human may have been much more advanced than we first realised. First discovered 10 years ago, [Homo neladi had a brain about a third the size of ours and yet it may have done complex things like burying its dead and controlling fire] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2350008-homo-naledi-may-have-used-fire-to-cook-and-navigate-230000-years-ago/) . The team learns about the latest finding from the Rising Star cave near Johannesburg. Mars has long been described as geologically dead, but [new evidence shows it may still be volcanically active] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2349663-mars-may-have-a-huge-plume-of-hot-rocks-rising-towards-its-surface/) . The team learns about a new theory which might explain what created the mysterious trenches in the Cerberus Fossae region of the planet. The largest complete map of the connections between neurons inside a brain has been made - but it’s not of a human brain. [This whole-brain connectome is that of a Drosophila larva - the larva of a fruit fly] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2349650-the-3013-neurons-in-the-brain-of-a-fly-larva-have-been-mapped-in-full/) . The team finds out about this massive undertaking - a stepping stone to describing the brains of more complex animals. [Are penguins self-aware] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2349971-adelie-penguins-show-signs-of-self-awareness-on-the-mirror-test/) ? When we try to answer this question in any animal, we tend to use the controversial mirror method - and that’s exactly what a group of researchers have done. But does it actually work, and can we trust the new findings? The remains of the last known thylacine (Tasmanian tiger) have been found, 80 years after they went missing. Self-described Australian mammal nerd Jack Ashby of Cambridge University tells the team how this curious mystery was solved. As the author of [Platypus Matters] (https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo170589562.html) , Jack also shares a story about Platypuses, and the “cocktail of misery” in the animal’s poisonous sting. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Leah Crane, Alison George and Michael Marshall. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: Half price deal: [newscientist.com/halfprice22] (http://newscientist.com/halfprice22) Climeworks: [www.climeworks.com] (http://www.climeworks.com) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

07 Dec 2022

31 MINS

31:29

07 Dec 2022


#151

#151 COP15: the meeting to save life on Earth; anti-ageing properties of urine

Following repeated delays, the [COP15 biodiversity conference is finally going ahead] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2349121-cop15-what-to-expect-at-the-biggest-biodiversity-summit-in-a-decade/) . On December 7th representatives from most of the countries in the world will meet to reach an agreement on how to address the global biodiversity crisis. There’s already a draft agreement in place, and the team explains the ambitions it lays out. But is this event likely to move the needle? A species of rat which should have gone extinct has somehow managed to keep going - and now we know why. In a story worthy of Margaret Atwood, the team finds out how the [Amami spiny rat continues to survive despite losing its Y chromosome] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2348800-a-rat-without-a-y-chromosome-could-be-a-glimpse-of-our-genetic-future/) , the one which makes males. There’s a genuine space race going on, with multiple companies hoping to become the first private firm to land on the Moon. The Japanese mission ispace has hit a delay, but the team explains how [a viable lunar economy is now a serious prospect] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2348517-japanese-firm-ispace-is-racing-to-put-first-private-lander-on-the-moon/) . [Newborn female mice who sniff the urine of other female mice live longer - considerably so in fact] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2347843-newborn-female-mice-live-longer-if-they-smell-older-females-urine/) . The team finds out what’s going on, and whether the finding applies to humans too… And Rowan chats with Henry Gee, senior editor at the journal Nature, who has won the 2022 Royal Society science book Prize. He describes his book, ‘A Very Short History of Life on Earth: 4.6 billion years in 12 chapters’, as a bedtime story for adults, that tells the greatest story ever - the whole saga of life on Earth. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Chelsea Whyte, James Dinneen, Michael Le Page and Leah Crane. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: Cyber Monday deal: [www.newscientist.com/cybermonday] (http://www.newscientist.com/cybermonday) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

01 Dec 2022

25 MINS

25:59

01 Dec 2022


#150

#150 Megadrought in the US; how to move an elephant

The southwestern US is currently in the midst of a [megadrought] (https://www.newscientist.com/article-topic/megadrought/) - the worst in 1200 years. And it has put [the Colorado River in crisis] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25634141-100-why-the-colorado-river-is-drying-up-and-what-we-can-do-about-it/) , an essential source of water for more than 40 million people. Can it be saved? Chelsea Whyte investigates. The team unveils [the fun new name] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2347426-ronnametres-and-quettagrams-have-joined-the-ranks-of-si-units/) s that have been chosen to define incomprehensibly massive and incredibly tiny numbers. These prefixes describe measurements that have more than 27 zeroes, created as part of the International System of Units. Like mac and cheese but hate the faff of making a roux? You’re in luck. Sam Wong shares [a science-based one-pot mac hack] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25634143-000-how-to-hack-your-macaroni-cheese/) , that’ll save you time and up the flavour too. Was [COP27 in Egypt] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2348153-cop27-absence-of-clear-vision-stalled-progress-at-climate-conference/) a success or a flop? Madeleine Cuff describes it as a mixed bag. After returning from the climate summit in Sharm El-Sheik, she reports on [the progress that was made] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2347834-countries-agree-to-create-climate-damage-fund-in-historic-cop27-deal/) , and [the vital issues] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2348073-what-are-climate-summits-actually-for-and-how-can-we-make-them-work/) that must be addressed over the next 12 months. Have you ever wondered how to move an elephant? Well, Ugandan wildlife vet Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka has done it, andit’s a struggle. She was given the task early on in her career, working at the Uganda Wildlife Education Centre, and she shares her experience. On the pod are Penny Sarchet, Chelsea Whyte, Alex Wilkins, Madeleine Cuff, Graham Lawton and Sam Wong. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . For New Scientist’s in depth series on the US megadrought, visit [newscientist.com/megadrought] (http://newscientist.com/megadrought) . Events and discount codes: Black Friday deal: [www.newscientist.com/blackfriday] (http://www.newscientist.com/blackfriday) New Scientist Business: [newscientist.com/b2bsurvey] (http://newscientist.com/b2bsurvey) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

24 Nov 2022

26 MINS

26:27

24 Nov 2022


#149

#149 COP27 treaty emerges; a method to discover wormholes

Cheering greeted Brazil’s president-elect, Lula da Silva, when he appeared at COP27 this week. Madeleine Cuff brings us a report from the climate conference in Egypt, where [Lula has made bold promises to protect the Amazon] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2347429-cop27-brazils-lula-promises-zero-deforestation-in-the-amazon-by-2030/) . She also tells us [what we can expect from this year’s draft treaty] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2346927-climate-negotiations-are-in-disarray-as-cop27-enters-its-second-week/) - and why the text has been causing quite a stir. There’s plenty going on in Space, with [NASA’s Artemis mission] (https://www.newscientist.com/podcasts/134-artemis-moon-mission-decoding-the-dreams-of-mice/) now finally launching to the Moon. And the news that [ we may be able to look for wormholes] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2346618-how-to-tell-the-difference-between-a-regular-black-hole-and-a-wormhole/) (if they exist). These are different to black holes because they are traversable - handy if you happen to be an interstellar traveller looking for a fast route across the universe. Our ancestors may have begun using sophisticated cooking methods as long as 780,000 years ago. The team explains how [fish teeth have been discovered near hearths at an ancient settlement in Israel] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2346856-early-humans-may-have-cooked-fish-in-ovens-780000-years-ago/) . And X-ray analysis suggests they may have been cooked in some sort of earthen oven. Rowan visits a colony of leaf-cutter ants, who use an incredible method of farming fungi that evolved between 45 and 65 million years ago. David Labonte at Imperial College London explains how this complex and decentralised society operates. And have you ever wondered [why some poos float and others sink] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2346620-we-now-know-why-some-poos-float-and-others-sink/) ? Too much fat in your diet? Fibre maybe? Or is it gas? Well, new research has lifted the toilet lid on this age-old question, and the team shares the results. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Madeleine Cuff, Leah Crane, Alice Klein and Sam Wong. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: New Scientist Discovery Tours: [www.newscientist.com/tours] (http://www.newscientist.com/tours) Amazon Future Engineer: [www.amazonfutureengineer.co.uk/ayic] (http://www.amazonfutureengineer.co.uk/ayic) Black Friday deal: [www.newscientist.com/blackfriday] (http://www.newscientist.com/blackfriday) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

17 Nov 2022

31 MINS

31:45

17 Nov 2022


#148

#148 Climate action from COP27; world population reaches 8 billion

Warnings over the world’s mad dash to create new supplies of fossil fuels, discussions about [climate loss and damage] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2346083-cop27-climate-summit-will-discuss-reparations-for-affected-countries/) , and talk about nature-based solutions. COP27 in Egypt is in full swing. Our reporter Madeleine Cuff brings us the latest, direct from Sharm el Sheikh. This week’s Sci-fi alert is the unusual discovery of a star with a solid surface. The team explains how on this magnetar (the dense corpse of an exploded star), gravity would be immense and time would behave really weirdly - that’s if you’d be able to land on the thing. They also discuss how the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica has been able to plot the course of cosmic neutrinos back to their home galaxy. The 15th of November has been chosen by the UN to mark the point that the number of people on the planet passes 8 billion. Despite this, the team explains how the world’s population isn’t accelerating, and is expected to peak sometime this century - sharing surprising statistics from Japan and China. Birds that migrate long distances are more likely to break up with their partners. Usually bird species are pretty much monogamous, so the team finds out why travelling species find it harder to stay together. “May this tusk root out the lice of the hair and the beard.” The team shares news of the discovery of the oldest readable sentence written using the first alphabet. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Madeleine Cuff, Leah Crane and Michael Le Page. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at newscientist.com. Events and discount codes: Half price offer: www.newscientist.com/halfpricedigital The Perception Census: www.perceptioncensus.dreamachine.world Wild Wild Life newsletter: newscientist.com/wildwildlife Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

10 Nov 2022

28 MINS

28:11

10 Nov 2022


#147

#147 The oldest yew trees in Europe – and how to save them

In a special episode of the podcast, host [Rowan Hooper] (https://twitter.com/rowhoop) visits Newlands Corner in the North Downs in southern England, the site of one of the oldest and most significant populations of wild yews growing anywhere in the world. Yew trees are familiar from churchyards and are also revered by pagans and shamans. They can live for many hundreds of years. The grove at Newlands Corner is an exceptional ecosystem, with yews over 1000 years old, but they are declining, losing their needles and slowly dying. Rowan meets arboreal scientist [Geoff Monck of Treecosystems] (https://www.treecosystems.co.uk/) , who specialises in surveying and restoring arboreal ecosystems. The cause of the decline in ancient yews has many factors, but the impact of [nitrates] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25033340-800-the-nitrogen-emergency-how-to-fix-our-forgotten-environmental-crisis/) in rainwater and in run-off from crop fields is perhaps the most important. Rowan hears how nitrates are [changing the way the wood wide web operates] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25033320-900-suzanne-simard-interview-how-i-uncovered-the-hidden-language-of-trees/) , and how we might be able to fix it. New Scientist podcasts are freely available. Subscribe at [newscientist.com/podcasts] (https://www.newscientist.com/podcasts/) . Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

07 Nov 2022

11 MINS

11:13

07 Nov 2022


#146

#146 Accelerated end to fossil fuel; double discovery on Mars

Spurred on by the war in Ukraine, we’re seeing a worldwide shift to green energy, with the global demand of fossil fuels now expected to peak in 15 years - a dose of optimism ahead of COP27. [The climate conference kicks off in Egypt on November 6] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2345094-climate-warnings-highlight-the-urgent-need-for-action-ahead-of-cop27/) , and the team brings a round-up of what we can expect. Maddie and Rowan also discuss their recent visit to the London Literature Festival, where they saw [Greta Thunberg speak] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2342816-the-climate-book-review-an-essential-guide-to-a-better-world/) . [‘Marsquakes’ studied by NASA’s InSight lander suggest Mars may still be volcanically active] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2344445-quakes-on-mars-reveal-there-may-be-magma-beneath-the-surface/) - and it [may have a subsurface water table similar to the one on Earth] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2344444-meteorite-impacts-show-marss-crust-is-denser-than-we-thought/) . The team says this is exciting news for the prospect of life existing on the Red Planet. “A victory not only for the region, but for humanity and life itself.” Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro has been unseated by Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. The team explains how Bolsonaro has presided over climate catastrophe, and [why this news has sparked celebration - and relief - from environmentalists] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2344713-brazil-election-lula-win-hailed-as-victory-for-the-amazon/) . Genetically modified mosquitoes have been released in a city in Brazil. The team explains how UK-based biotechnology firm Oxitec have done this in an effort to find ways to eliminate mosquitoes. The insects transmit deadly diseases like malaria, which kills more than 600,000 people a year. And we bring you a controversial ‘Lifeform of the Week’ - everyone’s most hated amphibian, the cane toad. Quite disturbingly, the team explains how new x-ray video footage shows that cane toads lick their own hearts when they swallow prey. Gross. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Madeleine Cuff, Sam Wong, Chris Simms and Alexandra Thompson. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: Early bird offer: [newscientist.com/earlybird22] (http://newscientist.com/earlybird22) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

03 Nov 2022

22 MINS

22:21

03 Nov 2022


#145

#145 COP27 climate summit preview; unexpected animal sounds

It’s already been a year since COP26, with its successor COP27 gearing up to begin on 6 November. 12 months on from some big pledges, the team [finds out how much action has actually been taken] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25634103-100-cop27-how-the-world-is-doing-on-climate-targets-and-what-to-expect/) , and whether this next climate conference is set to move the needle further. Quacks, barks and farts; listen out for some intriguing and unexpected animal sounds. The team shares the [newly discovered vocalisations] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2343954-vocal-communication-recorded-in-53-animals-we-thought-were-silent/) of some animals, like turtles and lungfish, that we previously thought were silent. Turmeric has become an increasingly popular supplement, particularly in the US. But reports are coming in that the spice is [causing liver injuries and turning people’s skin yellow] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2343736-turmeric-supplements-have-been-linked-to-liver-damage-in-five-people/) . The team finds out what’s going on. A quantum watch is a [completely new way to measure time] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2343039-quantum-watch-is-a-completely-new-way-of-measuring-time/) . Using quantum interference, this new technique can accurately measure tiny nanoseconds of time. Although its applications are quite niche, the team explains how this technology could be very useful. As a Halloween treat, our Life Form of the Week is the pumpkin and other squashes. The team dives into the surprising origins of these strange, hard-skinned fruits, and [how they came to spread worldwide] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2342838-the-surprising-evolutionary-history-of-pumpkins-and-squashes/) . On the pod are Penny Sarchet, Chelsea Whyte, Michael Le Page, Leah Crane, Sam Wong, Alice Klein and Rowan Hooper. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (newscientist.com) . Events and discount codes: Halloween sale: [newscientist.com/Halloween22] (newscientist.com/Halloween22) New Scientist Discovery Tours: [newscientist.com/tours] (newscientist.com/tours) Wild Wild Life newsletter: [newscientist.com/wildwildlife] (newscientist.com/wildwildlife) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

27 Oct 2022

22 MINS

22:14

27 Oct 2022


#144

#144 Geoengineering plan to slow the melt of arctic ice

An extended bonus episode of the podcast, where we learn more about proposals to slow the rate of ice loss in Greenland - and if it works, in Antarctica - using a local form of geoengineering. Host [Rowan Hooper] (https://twitter.com/rowhoop) speaks to glaciologist John Moore and environmental social scientist Ilona Mettiäinen, both from the University of Lapland in Finland. They discuss the proposal, [which involves building a giant, submerged curtain to stop warm sea water getting underneath the ice sheet] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2343633-engineering-firms-explore-plan-to-slow-melting-of-greenland-glacier/) . They explore the funding and effort needed to pull off a project as big as this. And they talk about local people’s feelings about preserving the ice, as for any intervention it will be vital to have endorsement from Greenlanders. To read about stories like this, subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

23 Oct 2022

25 MINS

25:37

23 Oct 2022


#143

#143 Bird flu sweeps UK; secrets of the Neanderthal family

Wild bird populations have been devastated by an avian flu variant that’s sweeping the UK - and more than 3.5 million captive birds have been culled. It’s expected to be [the worst winter on record for avian flu] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2342840-uk-prepares-for-worst-bird-flu-outbreak-on-record-this-winter/) - and the team finds out why. [Female robins sing just as much, and just as beautifully, as their male counterparts] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2341846-scientists-finally-realised-female-robins-sing-just-as-well-as-males/) . It might sound like a no-brainer, but we’ve only just found this out, which the team explains is due to a male bias in ornithology. They share songs from both a male and female robin, and discuss how brutally aggressive these birds can be. [New Neanderthal genomes have been sequenced] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2342731-neanderthal-family-life-revealed-by-ancient-dna-from-siberian-cave/) , giving us a glimpse into the lives - and inbreeding habits - of a family that lived in a cave in the Altai mountains. [Livers transplanted from older donors can keep working for over 100 years] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2342602-transplanted-livers-can-keep-working-for-a-total-of-over-100-years/) - outliving those given by younger donors. There are some clues that might explain how this is possible, and the team says it could be a game-changer for the future of transplant surgery. If all the ice in Greenland melted, it would raise the sea level by 7.2 metres. Although some melting is already locked in due to climate change, it might be possible to physically slow the rate of ice loss. Following a meeting of the Arctic Circle Assembly in Iceland, a team of scientists is investigating a way of slowing the ice melt by stopping warm sea water getting underneath the ice sheet. Rowan speaks to glaciologist John Moore and environmental social scientist Ilona Mettiäinen, both from the University of Lapland in Finland. On the pod are [Rowan Hooper] (https://twitter.com/rowhoop) , Penny Sarchet, Carissa Wong, Madeleine Cuff and Michael Le Page. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: New Scientist Discovery Tours: [newscientist.com/tours] (http://newscientist.com/tours) New Scientist gift subscription: [newscientist.com/earlybird22] (http://newscientist.com/earlybird22) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

20 Oct 2022

26 MINS

26:05

20 Oct 2022


#142

#142: We need to talk about mental health and climate change

In 2022, for the first time, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change included mental health as part of its assessment of the impacts of climate change. Conditions such as anxiety, stress and post traumatic stress disorder are all predicted to increase as temperatures rise and people experience extreme weather events. To mark World Mental Health Day (Monday 10th October), Rowan spoke to ‘Losing Eden’ author Lucy Jones, and energy and climate scientist Gesche Huebner, to find out how the climate and nature crises are impacting our mental health - and what to do about it. This episode is an extended version of the edited interview on last week’s podcast - we hope you enjoy it. Events and discount codes: Dow: [newscientist.com/dow] (newscientist.com/dow) New Scientist Autumn campaign: [www.newscientist.com/pod13] (www.newscientist.com/pod13) Big Thinker: [newscientist.com/spaceandmotion] (newscientist.com/spaceandmotion) Mental health resources: UK Samaritans; US National Institute for Mental Health; help with climate anxiety Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

17 Oct 2022

17 MINS

17:45

17 Oct 2022


#141

#141 Energy threat to international security; a new form of multiplication

The climate crisis is [as great a threat to energy security as Russia’s war on Ukraine] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2341877-extreme-weather-threat-to-energy-security-is-as-serious-as-ukraine-war/) , warns the World Meteorological Organization. The team finds out what sort of threats we’re talking about, and discusses potential solutions. Imagine looking up at the skyline, ready to take in a beautiful sunset, and there it is - [a massive, Moon-sized advert, stretched out across the skyline] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2341335-space-adverts-are-now-economically-viable-but-potentially-dangerous/) . The team explains how it might be possible (and practical) to do it soon. The [ erect-crested penguin is the least studied penguin in the world] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2341866-erect-crested-penguins-always-reject-their-first-egg-and-lay-another/) - largely because it lives on remote islands off the coast of New Zealand. But Rowan and Alice find out more - as well as discovering about the surprising sex lives of penguins. [DeepMind’s newest artificial intelligence has discovered a new way to multiply numbers] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2340343-deepmind-ai-finds-new-way-to-multiply-numbers-and-speed-up-computers/) - the first improvement in over 50 years. It’s an algorithm for something called matrix multiplication, and the team finds out how it could speed up computers by as much as 20 per cent. To mark World Mental Health Day (Monday 10th October), Rowan speaks to ‘Losing Eden’ author Lucy Jones, and energy and climate scientist Gesche Huebner, to find out how the climate and nature crises are impacting our mental health - and what to do about it. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Madeleine Cuff and Matt Sparkes. To read about these subjects and much more, you can subscribe to New Scientist magazine at [newscientist.com] (https://www.newscientist.com/) . Events and discount codes: Dow: [newscientist.com/dow] (http://newscientist.com/dow) New Scientist Autumn campaign: [www.newscientist.com/pod13] (https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.newscientist.com%2Fpod13&data=05%7C01%7CRowan.Hooper%40newscientist.com%7Cc47d0ce9369d427107f408daab73eb9a%7C0f3a4c644dc54a768d4152d85ca158a5%7C0%7C0%7C638010811606888343%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=eltkBVTLIAqEoBYi9gCphSgxQa95sgnCJshy1vUIe30%3D&reserved=0) Big Thinker: [newscientist.com/spaceandmotion] (https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.newscientist.com%2Fspaceandmotion&data=05%7C01%7CRowan.Hooper%40newscientist.com%7C57fef8ddedd74d4cb1b108daab756e50%7C0f3a4c644dc54a768d4152d85ca158a5%7C0%7C0%7C638010818098127066%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=ecCfsts9KYW7Xw899VkRFYkcoDh0yIomygATm%2BdgsVA%3D&reserved=0) Mental health resources: [UK Samaritans] (https://www.samaritans.org/) ; US [National Institute for Mental Health] (https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/find-help) ; [help with climate anxiety] (https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/is-climate-change-keeping-you-up-at-night-you-may-have-climate-anxiety-202206132761) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

13 Oct 2022

30 MINS

30:10

13 Oct 2022