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Nature Podcast podcast

Nature Podcast

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors. Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information.

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors. Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information.

 

#610

Audio long read: Science and the World Cup — how big data is transforming football

Big data is playing an increasingly important role in football, with technologies capturing huge amounts of information about players' positions and actions during a match. To make sense of all this information, most elite football teams now employ data analysts plucked from top companies and laboratories. Their insights are helping to steer everything from player transfers to the intensity of training, and have even altered how the game is played. This is an audio version of our Feature: [Science and the World Cup: how big data is transforming football] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03698-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

Yesterday

16 MINS

16:26

Yesterday


#609

The satellite-free alternative to GPS

00:45 Precision positioning without satellites ---------------------------------------------- Satellite navigation has revolutionized how humans find their way. However, these systems often struggle in urban areas, where buildings can interfere with weak satellite signals. To counter this, a team has developed an alternative, satellite-free system, which could improve applications that require precise positioning in cities, such as self-driving cars. Research Article: [Koelemeij et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05315-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Phone signals can help you find your way in cities even without GPS] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03696-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:19 Research Highlights ------------------------- How deforestation is the biggest threat to a rare lemur’s existence, and ultraviolet-activated molecules can kick-start plastic polymerization. Research Highlight: [This rare primate will not survive deforestation] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03116-6?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Lights, chemical reaction! Plastics take shape with help from UV light] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03709-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 12:16 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, a survey reveals the challenges facing international postgraduate students, and the key takeaways from COP27. Nature Careers: [Obstacle race: the barriers facing graduates who study abroad] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03702-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [COP27 climate talks: what succeeded, what failed and what’s next] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03807-0?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) New York Times: [U.N. Climate Talks End With a Deal to Pay Poor Nations for Damage] (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/11/20/climate/un-climate-cop27-loss-damage.html?smid=url-share?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

23 Nov 2022

23 MINS

23:54

23 Nov 2022


#608

How a key Alzheimer's gene wreaks havoc in the brain

00:46 Artemis 1 is go! ---------------------- NASA’s Artemis 1 mission has successfully reached Earth orbit. After weeks of delays and issues, and a nail biting launch, the rocket marks the first step in a new era of moon exploration, with plans to test a new way to return astronauts to the moon. We caught up with reporter for all-things-space, Alex Witze, for the latest. News: [Lift off! Artemis Moon rocket launch kicks off new era of human exploration] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02310-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 10:06 Research Highlights ------------------------- The unlevel playing field in women’s football, and domed structures provide evidence for a biological origin of stromatolites. Research Article: [Okholm Kryger et al.] (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12283-022-00384-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Article: [Hickman-Lewis et al.] (https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geology/article/doi/10.1130/G50390.1/618747/Advanced-two-and-three-dimensional-insights-into?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 12:39 A mechanistic link for an Alzheimer’s gene ------------------------------------------------ Alzheimer’s disease is a form of dementia that affects millions of people every year. Whilst the biggest risk factor of late-onset Alzheimer’s is age, there are a number of genes that have been implicated. How exactly these genes underpin this disease is unclear, but new research may now reveal how one of them does so, by affecting the myelination of neurons. The authors hope this work may help uncover treatments for Alzheimer’s. Research Article: [Blanchard et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05439-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Alzheimer’s risk variant APOE4 linked to myelin-assembly malfunction] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03371-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 20:44 Updates from COP27 ------------------------ The second week of the 27th UN Climate Change Conference is underway, as policymakers and scientists try to come together to tackle climate change. Flora Graham, senior editor at Nature is in Egypt at the conference and we caught up with her for the latest. News: [‘Actions, not just words’: Egypt’s climate scientists share COP27 hopes] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03691-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News: [Carbon emissions hit new high: warning from COP27] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03657-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

16 Nov 2022

27 MINS

27:32

16 Nov 2022


#607

Audio long read: She was convicted of killing her four children. Could a gene mutation set her free?

Kathleen Folbigg has spent nearly 20 years in prison after being convicted of killing her four children. But in 2018, a group of scientists began gathering evidence that suggested another possibility for the deaths — that at least two of them were attributable to a genetic mutation that can affect heart function. A judicial inquiry in 2019 failed to reverse Folbigg’s conviction, but this month, the researchers will present new evidence at a second inquiry, which could ultimately spell freedom for Folbigg. This is an audio version of our Feature: [She was convicted of killing her four children. Could a gene mutation set her free?] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03577-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

14 Nov 2022

31 MINS

31:19

14 Nov 2022


#606

Molecular cages sift 'heavy' water from near-identical H2O

00:49 Separating heavy water with molecular cages ------------------------------------------------- Heavy water is molecule very similar to H2O but with deuterium isotopes in the place of hydrogen atoms. Heavy water is useful in nuclear reactions, drug design and nutritional studies, but it's difficult to separate from normal water because they have such similar properties. Now, a team have developed a new separation method using tiny molecular cages, which they hope opens up more energy efficient ways to produce heavy water. Research article: [Su et al.] (https://go.nature.com/3UlE7uR) News and Views: [A molecular flip-flop for separating heavy water] (https://go.nature.com/3NTGwKZ) 07:23 Research Highlights ------------------------- How dancers can feel the beat even when they can’t hear it, and how climate change might move desert dunes. Research Highlight: [Dancers pick up the pace on a bass beat — even though it’s inaudible] (https://go.nature.com/3huoLG3) Research Highlight: [Desert dunes pose more danger as Earth warms] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03527-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:25 Monitoring bridge health using crowd data ----------------------------------------------- Bridges are vital pieces of infrastructure but their structural health is hard to monitor, requiring either sophisticated sensors or intense surveying by human engineers. Now though, researchers have utilized large amounts of smartphone accelerometer data to check the health of the Golden Gate Bridge. They hope this new technique can be used to effectively and cheaply monitor bridges around the world. Research Article: [Matarazzo et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s44172-022-00025-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Communications Engineering special issue: [Resilient Infrastructure] (https://www.nature.com/collections/ihecgbaaih?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 17:00 COP27 gets underway ------------------------- This week the 27th UN Climate Change Conference began, with world leaders, scientists and activists coming together to continue negotiations aimed at reining in global warming. Jeff Tollefson, senior reporter at Nature, joined us to talk about what’s been happening and what to expect, as the conference continues. News: [Climate change is costing trillions — and low-income countries are paying the price] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03573-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News: [As COP27 kicks off, Egypt warns wealthy nations against ‘backsliding’] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03585-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News: [COP27 climate summit: what scientists are watching] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03521-x?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

09 Nov 2022

24 MINS

24:46

09 Nov 2022


#605

Audio long read: The controversial embryo tests that promise a better baby

Companies are offering genetic tests of embryos generated by in vitro fertilization that they say allow prospective parents to choose those with the lowest risk for diseases such as diabetes or certain cancers. However, some researchers are concerned about the accuracy and ethics of these tests. This is an audio version of our Feature: [The controversial embryo tests that promise a better baby] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02961-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

04 Nov 2022

19 MINS

19:37

04 Nov 2022


#604

Flies can move their rigid, omnidirectional eyes – a little

00:46 How flies can move their eyes (a little) ---------------------------------------------- It's long been assumed flies’ eyes don’t move, and so to alter their gaze they need to move their heads. Now, researchers have shown that this isn’t quite true and that fruit flies can actually move their retinas using a specific set of muscles, which may allow them to perceive depth. The team also hope that this movement may provide a window into some of the flies’ internal processes. Research article: [Fenk et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05317-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:54 Research Highlights ------------------------- How the 80-year-old wreck of a sunken warship is influencing ocean microbes, and tracing an epilepsy-related gene variant back to a single person from 800 years ago. Research Highlight: [A ship sunk during the Second World War still stirs up the seabed] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03387-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Families on three continents inherited their epilepsy from a single person] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03383-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:11 Calls to mandate militaries’ emissions reporting ------------------------------------------------------ The eyes of the world will be focused on the UN’s upcoming COP27 conference to see what governments will pledge to do to reduce global emissions. But there’s one sector of countries’ carbon outputs that remains something of a mystery: the emissions of their militaries. We speak to Oliver Belcher, one of a group of researchers who have written a Comment article for Nature, calling for better reporting and greater accountability for these military emissions. Comment: [Decarbonize the military — mandate emissions reporting] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03444-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 19:07 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time: efforts from Middle East countries to cut greenhouse-gas emissions while still supplying fossil fuels; the upcoming demise of NASA’s InSight spacecraft; and new estimates for how long bacteria could survive on Mars. Nature News: [The Middle East is going green — while supplying oil to others] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03346-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [NASA spacecraft records epic ‘marsquakes’ as it prepares to die] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03447-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) New Scientist: [Bacteria could survive just under Mars's surface for 280 million years] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2344099-bacteria-could-survive-just-under-marss-surface-for-280-million-years/?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

02 Nov 2022

30 MINS

30:13

02 Nov 2022


#603

Racism in Health: the harms of biased medicine

When COVID-19 hit it didn't kill indiscriminately. In the US, being Black, Hispanic, or Native American meant you had a much greater risk of death than if you were white. And these disparities are mirrored across the world. In this episode we explore the complex tale behind this disparity. Throughout history, racism and biases have been embedded within medical technology, along the clinicians who use it. Cultural concepts of race have been falsely conflated with biology. The way medicine is taught, has reinforced flawed stereotypes. Disease itself, has been racialised. All of this adds up to barriers to care and worse health outcomes for many people, just because of the colour of their skin. Science and scientists have played an influential part in embedding such racism into medicine But by challenging received wisdom science too has the power to right wrongs, and work towards solutions. [Read more of Nature's coverage of racism in science.] (https://www.nature.com/immersive/d42859-022-00031-8/index.html) [Click here for our list of sources] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03325-z) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

28 Oct 2022

39 MINS

39:35

28 Oct 2022


#602

Ancient DNA reveals family of Neanderthals living in Siberian cave

In this episode: 00:54 Siberian cave offers first-ever glimpse into Neanderthal family --------------------------------------------------------------------- By analysing ancient DNA recovered from bone fragments found in two Siberian caves, researchers have identified a set of closely related Neanderthals: a father and daughter, as well as several other more-distant relatives. The work suggests that Neanderthal communities were small, and that females may have left their families to join other groups. Research article: [Skov et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05283-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [The first genomic portrait of a Neanderthal family] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03005-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:14 Research Highlights ------------------------- The robotic falcon that frightens nuisance flocks, and how climate change could lead to power loss in low-income households. Research Highlight: [Plagued by problem birds? Call RobotFalcon!] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03386-0?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Loss of power looms for some families as climate changes] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03385-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 12:32 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, assessing why women are cited less often than men in physics, and uncovering a long-lost star-map from ancient Greece. Science: [Women researchers are cited less than men. Here’s why—and what can be done about it] (https://www.science.org/content/article/women-researchers-cited-less-men-heres-why-what-can-done?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [First known map of night sky found hidden in Medieval parchment] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03296-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

26 Oct 2022

23 MINS

23:01

26 Oct 2022


#601

Human brain organoids implanted into rats could offer new way to model disease

In this episode: 00:45 Implanted brain organoids could offer new insights into disease --------------------------------------------------------------------- Brain organoids — lab-grown, self-organizing structures made of stem cells — are used in research to better understand brain development and disease progression. However, these structures lack connections seen in real brains, limiting their usefulness. To overcome this, a team has now transplanted human organoids into the brains of newborn rats, showing that these implanted organoids respond to stimuli and could influence the animals’ behaviour. Research article: [Revah et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05277-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Human brain organoids influence rat behaviour] (https://www.nature.com/articlesd41586-022-02977-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:20 Research Highlights ------------------------- The subtle timing shift that gives jazz music its ‘swing’, and why hydrogen power could be a cost-effective way to reduce heavy industry emissions in China. Research Highlight: [What gives jazz its swing? A delay makes the difference] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03082-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Hydrogen could help China’s heavy industry to get greener] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03084-x?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:46 The exoskeleton boot that makes walking more efficient ------------------------------------------------------------ Wearable robotic exoskeletons that aid or enhance movement are fast becoming a reality, but there are challenges to overcome — to work best these devices frequently require careful calibration for their user using specialist equipment and time in a lab. Now, a team have created exoskeleton boots that can help people walk faster and more efficiently by learning and adapting to the wearer’s gait as they walk. They hope that this approach could be used to develop personalised assistive devices in the future. Research article: [Slade et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05191-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature Video: [The robot boot that learns as you walk] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=989EIeMXQfo?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

12 Oct 2022

18 MINS

18:05

12 Oct 2022


#600

Virtual library of LSD-like drugs could reveal new antidepressants

In this episode: 00:46 A virtual chemical library uncovers potential antidepressants Certain psychedelic drugs are of interest to researchers due to their promising antidepressant effects.To help speed up the discovery of molecules with useful properties, researchers have built a virtual library of 75 million compounds related to these drugs. This approach yielded two molecules that showed antidepressant properties in mice, but without the hallucinogenic activity of psychedelic drugs. Research article: [Kaplan et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05258-z#?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Briefing: [Bespoke library docking for 5-HT2A receptor agonists with antidepressant activity] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03020-z#?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:25 Research Highlights Research suggests that ancient artificial island settlements were hubs of activity for society’s elite, and astronomers spot possibly the most luminous star ever observed. Research Highlight: [Ancient DNA suggests that artificial islands were party spots for the elite] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03053-4#?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Scientists face down ‘Godzilla’, the most luminous star known] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03054-3#?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 10:42 Nobel News Flora Graham from the Nature Briefing joins us to talk about the winners of this year’s Nobel Prizes. Nature News: [Geneticist who unmasked lives of ancient humans wins medicine Nobel] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03086-9#?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [‘Spooky’ quantum-entanglement experiments win physics Nobel] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03088-7#?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [Chemists who invented revolutionary 'click' reactions win Nobel] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03087-8#?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Enter Nature’s ‘Scientist at Work’ photo competition, full details here] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03114-8#?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (#) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

05 Oct 2022

18 MINS

18:40

05 Oct 2022


#599

Nature's Take: How the war in Ukraine is impacting science

The ongoing war in Ukraine has devastated the global economy, rocked geopolitics, killed thousands of people and displaced millions. Science too has been affected and the impacts on research are being felt more widely than just in Ukraine and Russia. In this episode of Nature's Takes we discuss the war's impact on publishing, international collaborations, climate change and energy, and the destructive impacts on scientists themselves. And as the war continues, we consider the future of science in the face of a new political climate. Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

03 Oct 2022

21 MINS

21:12

03 Oct 2022


#598

Audio long read: What scientists have learnt from COVID lockdowns

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many countries introduced strict lockdowns to help prevent spread of the disease. Since then, researchers have been studying the effects of these measures to help inform responses to future crises. Conclusions suggest that countries that acted swiftly to bring in strict measures did best at preserving lives and their economies, but analysing the competing costs and benefits of lockdowns has been tough, as this work often comes down not to scientific calculations, but value judgements. This is an audio version of our Feature: [What scientists have learnt from COVID lockdowns] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02823-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

30 Sep 2022

22 MINS

22:38

30 Sep 2022


#597

A trove of ancient fish fossils helps trace the origin of jaws

In this episode: 00:45 Piecing together the early history of jawed vertebrates A wealth of fossils discovered in southern China shed new light onto the diversity of jawed and jawless fish during the Silurian period, over 400 million years ago. Nature editor Henry Gee explains the finds and what they mean for the history of jawed vertebrates like us. Research article: [Zhu et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05136-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research article: [Gai et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04897-6?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research article: [Andreev et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05233-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research article: [Andreev et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05166-2?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Fossils reveal the deep roots of jawed vertebrates] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02973-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:09 Research Highlights Mice studies help explain why some people with a rare genetic condition have heightened musical abilities, and high-resolution images reveal how bees build honeycomb. Research Highlight: [How a missing gene leads to super-sensitivity to sound] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03034-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [X-rays reveal how bees achieve an engineering marvel: the honeycomb] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03008-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:27 A lack of evidence in transgender policy making Around the world, many laws are being proposed – and passed – regarding the rights of transgender people to participate in various aspects of society. We talk to Paisley Currah, who has written a World View for Nature arguing that these policies are frequently not backed up by data, and that policy affecting trans people’s lives needs to take a more evidence-based approach. World View: [To set transgender policy, look to the evidence] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03036-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Watch our video about research trying to crack the nature of consciousness [by dosing volunteers with psychedelic drugs and scanning their brains.] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Tl7ktZLWF8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

28 Sep 2022

19 MINS

19:10

28 Sep 2022


#596

Huge dataset shows 80% of US professors come from just 20% of institutions

00:46 Inequalities in US faculty hiring --------------------------------------- In the US, where a person gained their PhD can have an outsized influence on their future career. Now, using a decade worth of data, researchers have shown there are stark inequalities in the hiring process, with 80% of US faculty trained at just 20% of institutions. Research article: [Wapman et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05222-x?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:01 Research Highlights ------------------------- How wildlife can influence chocolate production, and the large planets captured by huge stars. Research Highlight: [A chocoholic’s best friends are the birds and the bats] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02908-0?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Giant stars turn to theft to snag jumbo planets] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02909-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:42 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, what science says about grieving for a public figure, and why suburban Australians are sharing increasingly sophisticated measures to prevent cockatoos from opening wheelie bins. Nature News: [Millions are mourning the Queen — what’s the science behind public grief?] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02945-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) The Guardian: [‘Interspecies innovation arms race’: cockatoos and humans at war over wheelie bin raids] (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/sep/13/interspecies-innovation-arms-race-cockatoos-and-humans-at-war-over-wheelie-bin-raids?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

21 Sep 2022

19 MINS

19:56

21 Sep 2022


#595

Complex synthetic cells bring scientists closer to artificial cellular life

00:46 Synthetic cells made from bacterial bits ---------------------------------------------- For years researchers have been interested in creating artificial cells, as they could be useful for manufacturing compounds and understanding how life works. Now a new method shows how this can be accomplished using polymer droplets that integrate components of burst bacteria. The synthesised cells are able to perform translation and transcription and have several features that resemble real cells, like a proto-nucleus and a cytoskeleton. Research article: [Xu et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05223-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Life brought to artificial cells] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02231-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:33 Research Highlights ------------------------- A mysterious ancient creature identified from its vomit, and the combination of immunity, diet and bacteria that could protect from metabolic disorders. Research Highlight: [The Jurassic vomit that stood the test of time] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02791-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [A sugary diet wrecks gut microbes — and their anti-obesity efforts] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02775-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:42 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, research on the safety of three-person embryos, and the gene that gave our ancestors an edge over neanderthals. Nature News: [Embryos with DNA from three people develop normally in first safety study] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02792-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [Did this gene give modern human brains their edge?] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02895-2?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

14 Sep 2022

20 MINS

20:15

14 Sep 2022


#594

Missing foot reveals world’s oldest amputation

00:46 Evidence of ancient surgery --------------------------------- A skeleton with an amputated foot discovered in Borneo has been dated to 31,000 years ago, suggesting that complex surgery might be much older than previously thought. The person whose foot was removed survived the procedure, which the researchers behind the find say shows the ‘surgeon’ must have had detailed knowledge of anatomy, and likely had access to antiseptic compounds. Research article: [Maloney et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05160-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [A surgical dawn 31,000 years ago in Borneo] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02340-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 10:12 Research Highlights ------------------------- Mummified reptiles hint at severe drought 250 million years ago, and mapping avalanche risk in remote locations. Research Highlight: [Quick-dried Lystrosaurus ‘mummy’ holds clues to mass death in the Triassic] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02323-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Avalanches in remote peaks are revealed with old satellites’ aid] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02772-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 13:09 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, how extreme heat has likely contributed to Pakistan’s devastating floods, and what the James Webb Space Telescope has revealed about exoplanets so far? Nature News: [Why are Pakistan’s floods so extreme this year?] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02813-6?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [Webb telescope wows with first image of an exoplanet] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02807-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [Webb telescope spots CO2 on exoplanet for first time: what it means for finding alien life] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02350-2?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

07 Sep 2022

21 MINS

21:42

07 Sep 2022


#593

Audio long read: Hybrid brains – the ethics of transplanting human neurons into animals

The development of brain chimaeras – made up of human and animal neurons – is an area of research that has hugely expanded in the past five years. Proponents say that these systems are yielding important insights into health and disease, but others say the chimeras represent an ethical grey zone, because of the potential to blur the line between humans and other animals, or to recapitulate human-like cognition in an animal. This is an audio version of our Feature: [Hybrid brains: the ethics of transplanting human neurons into animals] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02073-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

26 Aug 2022

23 MINS

23:31

26 Aug 2022


#592

How to make water that's full of holes

In this episode: 00:45 How adding pores helps water carry gas -------------------------------------------- Although water is an excellent solvent, it’s limited in its ability to dissolve gasses. To overcome this a team have developed ‘porous water’ containing tiny cages that can hold large numbers of gas molecules. The team suggest that this technology could have multiple medical applications, including in the development of artificial blood. Research article: [Erdosy et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05029-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Suspended pores boost gas solubility in water] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02224-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:35 Research Highlights ------------------------- Synthetic ‘nerves’ help mice to walk, and planets orbiting a star that’s due to go supernova. Research Highlight: [Stretchy synthetic nerve helps mice give ball a mighty kick] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02196-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [A massive planet circles a huge star doomed to explode] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02166-0?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 14:16 When did hominins get on their feet? ------------------------------------------ One of humanity's defining characteristics is our ability to walk on two legs. However, when this ability evolved remains a mystery. A paper out this week suggests that the species Sahelanthropus tchadensis was walking on two legs seven million years ago – but others dispute these findings. We hear about the research and the debate surrounding it. News: [Seven-million-year-old femur suggests ancient human relative walked upright] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02313-7) Research article: [Daver et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04901-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Standing up for the earliest bipedal hominins] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02226-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 21:45 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, modelling an enormous, extinct megalodon shark, and a potential way to break down ‘forever chemicals’. The Guardian: [Ancient megalodon shark could eat a whale in a few bites, research suggests] (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/aug/17/ancient-megalodon-shark-could-eat-a-whale-in-a-few-bites-research-suggests?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [How to destroy ‘forever chemicals’: cheap method breaks down PFAS] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02247-0?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

24 Aug 2022

30 MINS

30:43

24 Aug 2022


#591

Do protons have intrinsic charm? New evidence suggests yes

00:47 Evidence of a proton’s charm ---------------------------------- For decades, scientists have debated whether protons have ‘intrinsic charm’, meaning they contain elementary particles known as charm quarks. Now, using machine learning to comb through huge amounts of experimental data, a team have shown evidence that the charm quark can be found within a proton, which may have important ramifications in the search for new physics. Research article: [The NNPDF Collaboration] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04998-2?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Evidence at last that the proton has intrinsic charm] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02186-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:26 Research Highlights ------------------------- How sea sponges ‘sneeze’ to clean their filters, and why bonobos’ infantile behaviour helps them receive consolation after conflict. Research Highlight: [How a sponge ‘sneezes’ mucus: against the flow] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02132-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Bonobo apes pout and throw tantrums — and gain sympathy] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02135-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 13:52 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the repeated evolution of the crab body-shape, and why demanding work can lead to mental fatigue. Discover: [Evolution Only Thinks About One Thing, and It’s Crabs] (https://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/evolution-only-thinks-about-one-thing-and-its-crabs?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [Why thinking hard makes us feel tired] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02161-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

17 Aug 2022

22 MINS

22:03

17 Aug 2022


#590

Nature's Take: what's next for the preprint revolution

In this first episode of Nature's Take, we get four of Nature's staff around microphones to get their expert take on preprints. These pre-peer-review open access articles have spiked in number over recent years and have cemented themselves as an integral part of scientific publishing. But this has not been without its issues. In this discussion we cover a lot of ground. Amongst other things, we ask whether preprints could help democratise science or contribute to a loss of trust in scientists. We pick apart the relationship between preprints and peer-reviewed journals and tackle some common misconceptions. We ask how preprints have been used by different fields and how the pandemic has changed the game. And as we look to the future, we ask how preprints fit into the discussion around open access and even if they could do away with journals all together. Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

15 Aug 2022

24 MINS

24:31

15 Aug 2022


#589

Why low temperatures could help starve tumours of fuel

Cold exposure in mice activates brown fat to deny tumours glucose, and the future of extreme heatwaves. 00:45 How cold temperatures could starve tumours A team of researchers have found that exposing mice to the cold could starve tumour cells of the blood glucose they need to thrive. They showed that the cold temperatures deprived the tumours of fuel by activating brown fat – a tissue that burns through glucose to keep body temperature up. The team also showed preliminary evidence of the effect occurring in one person with cancer, but say that more research is needed before this method can be considered for clinical use. Research article: [Seki et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05030-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:59 Research Highlights Evidence of the world’s southernmost human outpost from before the Industrial Revolution, and how jumping up and down lets canoes surf their own waves. Research Highlight: [Bones and weapons show just how far south pre-industrial humans got] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02111-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [How jumping up and down in a canoe propels it forwards] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02097-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:24 The future of extreme heatwaves Climate scientists have long warned that extreme heat and extreme heatwaves will become more frequent as a result of climate change. But across the world these events are happening faster, and more furiously, than expected, and researchers are scrambling to dissect recent heatwaves to better understand what the world might have in store. News Feature: [Extreme heatwaves: surprising lessons from the record warmth] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02114-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

10 Aug 2022

21 MINS

21:54

10 Aug 2022


#588

Massive Facebook study reveals a key to social mobility

00:47 The economic benefits of social connections ------------------------------------------------- By looking at data gathered from billions of Facebook friendships, researchers have shown that having more connections with people from higher income groups could increase future incomes by 20%. They also show how such connections can be formed, and how schools and other institutions could help to improve peoples’ opportunities in the future. Research Article: [Chetty et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04996-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Article: [Chetty et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04997-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [The social connections that shape economic prospects] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01843-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Link to the data] (https://socialcapital.org/?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:06 Research Highlights ------------------------- How balloons could help measure quakes on Venus, and the parasitic fungus that tricks flies into mating with fly corpses. Research Highlight: [Balloon flotilla detects an earthquake from high in the sky] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02028-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [The fungus that entices male flies to mate with female corpses] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02027-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 13:40 Reviving pig organs hours after death ------------------------------------------- When someone dies, tissues start to irreversibly degrade, but recently this irreversibility has been brought into question by studies showing that some organs can be partially revived several hours after death. Now, working in pigs, researchers have shown it is possible to revive the functions of several organs at once. This could pave the way for improved organ transplantation, but ethicists advise caution. Research Article: [Andrijevic et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05016-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Improved organ recovery after oxygen deprivation] (https://www.nature.com/d41586-022-01995-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News: [Pig organs partially revived in dead animals — researchers are stunned] (https://www.nature.com/d41586-022-02112-0?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

03 Aug 2022

22 MINS

22:56

03 Aug 2022


#587

Coronapod: the open-science plan to unseat big Pharma and tackle vaccine inequity

Inequity has been a central feature of the COVID19 pandemic. From health outcomes to access to vaccines, COVID has pushed long-standing disparities out of the shadows and into the public eye and many of these problems are global. In this episode ofCoronapodwe dig into a radical new collaboration of 15 countries - co-led by the WHO, and modelled on open-science. The project, called the mRNA vaccine technology transfer hub, aims to create independent vaccine hubs that could supply the global south, and take on the giants of the pharmaceutical industry in the process. But the road ahead is long - the challenges are complex and numerous, and the odds are stacked against them. But at a time when stakes couldn't be higher, momentum is building and if successful, the tantalising possibility of an end to a dangerous legacy of dependence looms. Can it be done? And if so, what needs to change to make it happen? We ask these questions and more. News Feature: [The radical plan for vaccine equity] (https://www.nature.com/immersive/d41586-022-01898-3/index.html) This project was supported by the Pulitzer Center. Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

29 Jul 2022

35 MINS

35:17

29 Jul 2022


#586

How humans adapted to digest lactose — after thousands of years of milk drinking

00:45 Working out how the ability to digest milk spread ------------------------------------------------------- Humans have been drinking milk for thousands of years, but it seems that they were doing so long before the ability to digest it became prevalent. Then around 2000 years ago, this ability became common in Europe, presenting a mystery to researchers – why then? Now by analyzing health data, ancient DNA, and fats residues from thousands of ancient pots, scientists have worked out what caused this trait to suddenly spread throughout Europe. Research Article: [Evershed et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05010-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [The mystery of early milk consumption in Europe] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-02041-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:56 Research Highlights ------------------------- How genes stolen from outside the animal kingdom have altered insects’ abilities, and a dormant black hole beyond the Milky Way gives insights into these objects' origins. Research Highlight: [Genes purloined from across the tree of life give insects a boost] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01971-x?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [A quiet black hole whispers its origin story] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01970-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:21 Assessing the addiction potential for therapeutic ketamine ---------------------------------------------------------------- Ketamine has shown great promise as a fast-acting antidepressant, but there have been concerns about the risks of addiction relating to this therapeutic use. Now, a team have looked in mice to see whether ketamine causes the behavioural and neuronal changes characteristic of addictive substances. They find that ketamine likely has a low addiction risk, which could inform future prescribing decisions in humans. Research article: [Simmler et al.] (https://www.nature.com/s41586-022-04993-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [A short burst of reward curbs the addictiveness of ketamine] (https://www.nature.com/d41586-022-01948-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 17:51 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, a report shows a significant decline in Australia’s environment and ecosystems, and how adding a gene greatly increases rice yield. The Conversation: [This is Australia’s most important report on the environment’s deteriorating health. We present its grim findings] (https://theconversation.com/this-is-australias-most-important-report-on-the-environments-deteriorating-health-we-present-its-grim-findings-186131?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Science: [Supercharged biotech rice yields 40% more grain] (https://go.nature.com/3PGcbQ3) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

27 Jul 2022

27 MINS

27:56

27 Jul 2022


#585

How researchers have pinpointed the origin of 'warm-blooded' mammals

00:46 When did mammals start to regulate their temperature? ----------------------------------------------------------- The evolution of ‘warm bloodedness’ allowed mammals to live in a more diverse range of habitats, but working out when this occurred has been difficult. To try and pin down a date, researchers have studied the fossilised remains of ancient mammals' inner ears, which suggest that this key evolutionary leap appeared around 230 million years ago. Research Article: [Araujo et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04963-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Evolution of thermoregulation as told by ear] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01943-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 07:14 Research Highlights ------------------------- A new surgical glue that’s both strong and easy to remove, and southern fin whales return to Antarctica after being hunted to near extinction. Research Highlight: [This adhesive bandage sticks strongly — even to hairy skin] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01912-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [A feeding frenzy of 150 whales marks a species’ comeback] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01910-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:47 Structure of an enzyme reveals how its so efficient --------------------------------------------------------- Hydrogen dependent CO2 reductase is an enzyme that can convert CO2 from the air into formic acid that can be used as fuel. It also does this extremely efficiently, but nobody has been quite sure how. Now researchers have an idea based on a detailed structural analysis. Research Article: [Dietrich et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04971-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 17:51 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the findings of some big biodiversity reports, and how woodpeckers don’t end up with headaches from their pecking. Nature News: [More than dollars: mega-review finds 50 ways to value nature] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01930-6?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [Major wildlife report struggles to tally humanity’s exploitation of species] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01917-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Science: [Contrary to popular belief, woodpeckers don’t protect their brains when headbanging trees] (https://www.science.org/content/article/contrary-popular-belief-woodpeckers-don-t-protect-their-brains-when-headbanging-trees?utm_source=Nature+Briefing&utm_campaign=25a0242322-briefing-dy-20220715&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c9dfd39373-25a0242322-44425441?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

20 Jul 2022

29 MINS

29:16

20 Jul 2022


#584

Ancient mud reveals the longest record of climate from the tropics

00:46 A long-term record of climate in the tropics -------------------------------------------------- To understand the history of the Earth’s climate, researchers often rely on things like ice cores, which contain layered frozen insights of thousands of years of history. However, in the tropics long-term records like these have been absent. Now researchers have uncovered a sediment core in Peru which reveals around 700,000 years of climatic history. Research Article: [Rodbell et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04873-0?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Sediment study finds the pulse of tropical glaciers] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01841-6?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:40 Research Highlights ------------------------- The biological ‘helmets’ that protect shrimp from themselves, and why the colour of wine bottles matters. Research Highlight: [‘Helmets’ shield shrimp from their own supersonic shock waves] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01832-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Why white wine in plain-glass bottles loses its bouquet] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01849-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 12:38 The James Webb Space Telescope reveals its first images ------------------------------------------------------------- After more than two decades of development, the James Webb Space Telescope has broadcast its first images in spectacular detail. We discuss how we got here, what’s next and what these images mean for science. News: [Stunning new Webb images: baby stars, colliding galaxies and hot exoplanets] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01931-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 21:33 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, we discuss a crystal made out of starfish embryos. Video: [How starfish embryos become living crystals] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01933-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

13 Jul 2022

28 MINS

28:30

13 Jul 2022


#583

Higgs boson at 10: a deep dive into the mysterious, mass-giving particle

In this Podcast Extra, Nature's Lizzie Gibney and Federico Levi take a deep-dive into the Higgs boson, describing their experiences of its discovery, what the latest run of the Large Hadron Collider might reveal about the particle's properties, and what role it could play in potential physics beyond the standard model. Nature News: [Happy birthday, Higgs boson! What we do and don’t know about the particle] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01834-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature Editorial: [Particle physics isn’t going to die — even if the LHC finds no new particles] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01819-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

11 Jul 2022

22 MINS

22:18

11 Jul 2022


#582

Coronapod: detecting COVID variants in sewage

Since early in the pandemic, scientists have searched for signals of SARS-CoV-2 transmission by sampling wastewater. This surveillance method has provided vital information to inform public health responses. But the approach has never been particularly specific - pointing to broad trends rather than granular information such as which variants are spreading where. But now a team from the University of California have created two new tools to sample waste water in much greater detail - and spot variants and their relative concentrations up to two weeks faster than testing-based surveillance methods. In this episode ofCoronapod, we discuss the paper and ask how a system like this could help countries around the world respond to the COVID pandemic and beyond. News: [COVID variants found in sewage weeks before showing up in tests] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01874-x) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

08 Jul 2022

11 MINS

11:27

08 Jul 2022


#581

Higgs boson turns ten: the mysteries physicists are still trying to solve

00:46 Happy birthday, Higgs boson - looking back at a momentous milestone for physics ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ten years ago this week, scientists announced that they’d found evidence of the existence of the Higgs boson, a fundamental particle first theorised to exist nearly sixty years earlier. To celebrate this anniversary, we reminisce about what the discovery meant at the time, and what questions are left to be answered about this mysterious particle. Nature News: [Happy birthday, Higgs boson! What we do and don’t know about the particle] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01834-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature Editorial: [Particle physics isn’t going to die — even if the LHC finds no new particles] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01819-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:09 Research Highlights ------------------------- Clever clothes that can cool or warm the wearer, and finding hidden DNA from the endangered red wolf. Research Highlight: [‘Smart’ clothing flexes to provide relief from the heat] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01781-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [‘Ghost’ DNA from the world’s rarest wolves lingers in coyotes] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01813-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 13:27 Supporting scientists who stutter --------------------------------------- Stuttering is a speech condition that affects around 70 million people worldwide, which can make things like speaking in public, or even one-on-one incredibly daunting. We hear the experiences of one researcher of stuttering, who also has a stutter, as they explain the best way to offer support to others. Careers Feature: [The conference challenges faced by scientists who stutter] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01829-2?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 22:10 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, we discuss how having similar smells could spark a friendship, and how viruses can alter our odour to make humans more attractive to mosquitos. New Scientist: [You're more likely to become friends with someone who smells like you] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2325559-youre-more-likely-to-become-friends-with-someone-who-smells-like-you/?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [How some viruses make people smell extra-tasty to mosquitoes] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01764-2?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) Hosted on Acast. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for more information. ... Read more

06 Jul 2022

29 MINS

29:32

06 Jul 2022