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Nature Podcast podcast

Nature Podcast

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information.

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information.

 

#567

Coronapod: 'viral ghosts' support idea that SARS-CoV-2 reservoirs could be behind long COVID

Millions of people around the world have been left managing the complex and amorphous syndrome that is long COVID. But the underlying cause of this myriad of symptoms is not clear. One hypothesis is that the virus is able to find a safe haven in the body from which it can bide its time and potentially re-emerge - a viral reservoir. Now researchers studying long COVID have found evidence of SARS-CoV-2 in a series of organs around the body, most notably the gut, months after the infection appears to have been cleared from the respiratory system. While there is still a long way to go before the reservoir hypothesis can be confirmed, these data provide compelling new support for the theory. In this episode ofCoronapod, we discuss how the studies were carried out, why the question of long COVID's cause is so difficult to crack, and what more needs to be done to get a firm answer. News: [Coronavirus ‘ghosts’ found lingering in the gut] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01280-3)  [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

13 May 2022

14 MINS

14:20

13 May 2022


#566

Retinas revived after donor's death open door to new science

00:57 Reviving retinas to understand eyes ----------------------------------------- Research efforts to learn more about diseases of the human eye have been hampered as these organs degrade rapidly after death, and animal eyes are quite different to those from humans. To address this, a team have developed a new method to revive retinas taken from donors shortly after their death. They hope this will provide tissue for new studies looking into the workings of the human eye and nervous system. Research article: [Abbas et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04709-x?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:05 Research Highlights ------------------------- A technique that simplifies chocolate making yields fragrant flavours, and 3D imaging reveals some of the largest-known Native American cave art. Research Highlight: [How to make a fruitier, more floral chocolate] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01225-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Cramped chamber hides some of North America’s biggest cave art] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01217-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 10:54 Did life emerge in an ‘RNA world’? ---------------------------------------- How did the earliest biochemical process evolve from Earth’s primordial soup? One popular theory is that life began in an ‘RNA world’ from which proteins and DNA evolved. However, this week a new paper suggests that a world composed of RNA alone is unlikely, and that life is more likely to have begun with molecules that were part RNA and part protein. Research article: [Müller et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04676-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [A possible path towards encoded protein synthesis on ancient Earth] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01256-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 17:52 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the ‘polarised sunglasses’ that helped astronomers identify an ultra-bright pulsar, and how a chemical in sunscreen becomes toxic to coral. Nature: [A ‘galaxy’ is unmasked as a pulsar — the brightest outside the Milky Way] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01226-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature: [A common sunscreen ingredient turns toxic in the sea — anemones suggest why] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01271-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

11 May 2022

25 MINS

25:20

11 May 2022


#565

Swapping in a bit of microbial 'meat' has big eco-gains

00:46 How a move to microbial protein could affect emissions ------------------------------------------------------------ It’s well understood that the production of meat has large impacts on the environment. This week, a team show that replacing 20% of future meat consumption with protein derived from microbes could reduce associated emissions and halve deforestation rates. Research article: [Humpenöder et al] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04629-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Mycoprotein produced in cell culture has environmental benefits over beef] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01125-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:21 Research Highlights ------------------------- How saltwater crocodiles’ penchant for pigs is driving population recovery in Australia, and solving the mystery of some eighteenth-century porcelain’s iridescent lustre. Research Highlight: [Pork dinners fuel huge crocodiles’ return from near-extinction] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01133-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [The nanoparticles that give a famed antique porcelain its dazzle] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01158-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 10:47 The neurons that help mosquitoes distinguish smell -------------------------------------------------------- Female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes strongly prefer human odours to those of animals, but how they distinguish between them is not well understood. Now, researchers have shown that human odours strongly activate a specific area in the brains of these insects, a finding that could have important implications for mosquito-control strategies. Research article: [Zhao et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04675-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 18:05 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, how climate change could affect virus transmission between mammals, and how the link between a dog's breed and its temperament may not be as close as previously thought. Nature: [Climate change will force new animal encounters — and boost viral outbreaks] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01198-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature: [Massive study of pet dogs shows breed does not predict behaviour] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01193-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Our Webby Award winning episode: [What’s the isiZulu for dinosaur? How science neglected African languages] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02264-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

04 May 2022

25 MINS

25:18

04 May 2022


#564

Coronapod: COVID and diabetes, what the science says

The true disability cost of the COVID-19 pandemic is still unknown, but more and more studies are adding to the list of potential fallout from even mild COVID 19 infection. In this episode ofCoronapodwe discuss a massive association study which links COVID-19 cases with an increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We delve into the numbers to ask how big the risk might be? Whether any casual relationship can be drawn from this association? And what might be in store from future research into COVID and chronic disease? News: [Diabetes risk rises after COVID, massive study finds] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00912-y) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

29 Apr 2022

09 MINS

09:34

29 Apr 2022


#563

How virtual meetings can limit creative ideas

00:56 How video calls can reduce creativity ------------------------------------------- As a result of the pandemic, workers around the world have become accustomed to meeting colleagues online. To find out if this switch from face-to-face meetings came at a cost to creativity, a team compared the number of ideas generated by workers collaborating either online, or in-person. They showed that people meeting virtually produced fewer creative ideas than those working face-to-face, and suggest that when it comes to idea generation maybe it’s time to turn the camera off. Research article: [Brucks & Levav] (https://go.nature.com/3KhSGdb) News and Views: [Virtual collaboration hinders idea generation] (https://go.nature.com/3Klj6e4) Video: [Why video calls are bad for brainstorming] (https://go.nature.com/3LlndIv) 08:08 Research Highlights ------------------------- Fragments from an ancient pyramid suggest earliest known use of a Maya calendar, and how sweet snacks could damage rare iguanas’ metabolism. Research Highlight: [Deer symbol hints at early adoption of Maya calendar] (https://go.nature.com/3vLI29h) Research Highlight: [Tourists’ sweet treats threaten rare iguanas’ health] (https://go.nature.com/38qgEWr) 10:34 Fish skin reveals a new type of cell division --------------------------------------------------- Researchers looking at the skin cells of zebrafish have discovered a new type of cell division, which doesn’t require DNA replication. DNA is usually essential for healthy cells, but the researchers think this puzzling finding may be a temporary measure to help the fish produce skin more rapidly during growth spurts. Research article: [Chan et al.] (https://go.nature.com/3OFFeDr) News and Views: [Stretched skin cells divide without DNA replication] (https://go.nature.com/3xYMS64) Video: [A new kind of cell division] (https://go.nature.com/3LlJSEl) 16:59 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, how laser-equipped submarines could help analyse gelatinous animals’ anatomy, and a push for a flagship mission to Uranus. The New Yorker: [Shedding Light on Untouchable Sea Creatures] (https://go.nature.com/3EPYtFM) Nature: [Next stop, Uranus? Icy planet tops priority list for next big NASA mission] (https://go.nature.com/3vjBIXx) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

27 Apr 2022

24 MINS

24:18

27 Apr 2022


#562

Audio long-read: The quest to prevent MS — and understand other post-viral diseases

Results from a huge epidemiological study found that infection by the Epstein-Barr virus increases the risk of developing multiple sclerosis 32-fold. This result, combined with emerging mechanistic insights into how the virus triggers brain damage, are raising the prospect of treating or preventing MS. These advances come at a time when researchers are more interested than ever in what happens in the months and years following a viral infection, and highlights the issues untangling the relationships between infectious diseases and chronic conditions. This is an audio version of our Feature: [The quest to prevent MS — and understand other post-viral diseases] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00808-x?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) . See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

25 Apr 2022

18 MINS

18:13

25 Apr 2022


#561

We could still limit global warming to just 2˚C — but there's an 'if'

00:46 What COP26 promises will do for climate --------------------------------------------- At COP26 countries made a host of promises and commitments to tackle global warming. Now, a new analysis suggests these pledges could limit warming to below 2˚C — if countries stick to them. BBC News: [Climate change: COP26 promises will hold warming under 2C] (https://go.nature.com/3rDX3bU) 03:48 Efficiency boost for energy storage solution -------------------------------------------------- Storing excess energy is a key obstacle preventing wider adoption of renewable power. One potential solution has been to store this energy as heat before converting it back into electricity, but to date this process has been inefficient. Last week, a team reported the development of a new type of ‘photothermovoltaic’ that increases the efficiency of converting stored heat back into electricity, potentially making the process economically viable. Science: [‘Thermal batteries’ could efficiently store wind and solar power in a renewable grid] (https://go.nature.com/381nDF7) 07:56 Leeches’ lunches help ecologists count wildlife ----------------------------------------------------- Blood ingested by leeches may be a way to track wildlife, suggests new research. Using DNA from the blood, researchers were able to detect 86 different species in China’s Ailaoshan Nature Reserve. Their results also suggest that biodiversity was highest in the high-altitude interior of the reserve, suggesting that human activity had pushed wildlife away from other areas. ScienceNews: [Leeches expose wildlife’s whereabouts and may aid conservation efforts] (https://go.nature.com/3uZaJAw) 11:05 How communication evolved in underground cave fish -------------------------------------------------------- Research has revealed that Mexican tetra fish are very chatty, and capable of making six distinct sounds. They also showed that fish populations living in underground caves in north-eastern Mexico have distinct accents. New Scientist: [Blind Mexican cave fish are developing cave-specific accents] (https://go.nature.com/3vvy63Q) 14:36 Declassified data hints at interstellar meteorite strike -------------------------------------------------------------- In 2014 a meteorite hit the Earth’s atmosphere that may have come from far outside the solar system, making it the first interstellar object to be detected. However, as some of the data needed to confirm this was classified by the US Government, the study wasn never published. Now the United States Space Command have confirmed the researchers’ findings, although the work has yet to be peer reviewed. LiveScience: [An interstellar object exploded over Earth in 2014, declassified government data reveal] (https://go.nature.com/3L685P1) Vice: [Secret Government Info Confirms First Known Interstellar Object on Earth, Scientists Say] (https://go.nature.com/3xH7CPB) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

20 Apr 2022

18 MINS

18:40

20 Apr 2022


#560

Coronapod: Infected immune cells hint at cause of severe COVID

Since the beginning of the pandemic there has been a debate amongst researchers about whether the body's immune cells can themselves be infected by SARS-CoV-2. Now two new studies show that they can - and what's more, the work has revealed a new mechanism for the massive inflammatory response seen in severe COVID. In this episode ofCoronapod, we dig into the papers, asking why it has taken so long to get an answer to this question? How immune cell infection could lead to severe disease? And whether this new mechanism could provide a new avenue for the development of therapeutics? News: [What triggers severe COVID? Infected immune cells hold clues] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00965-z) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

15 Apr 2022

11 MINS

11:16

15 Apr 2022


#559

Why do naked mole rats live as long as giraffes?

00:54 How Mammals’ mutation rates affects their lifespan -------------------------------------------------------- For biologists, a long-standing question has been why some animals live longer than others. This week a team have attempted to answer this, by measuring the rates that different animal species accumulate mutations. They show that longer-lived animals acquire mutations at a slower rate, which helps to explain why cancer risk does not scale with lifespan. Research article: [Cagan et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04618-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Mutational clocks tick differently across species] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00976-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 07:56 Research Highlights ------------------------- A clinical trial suggests a change to the treatment of a pregnancy ailment, and astronomers identify the largest known structure produced by a single galaxy. Research Highlight: [Ambitious trial inspires a rethink on a common ailment of pregnancy] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00981-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Even among ‘giant’ galaxies this one is record-setting] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00980-0?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 10:43 The war in Ukraine’s effects on global energy --------------------------------------------------- Many European countries are dependent on Russian fossil fuels for energy production. Following Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, these countries are looking to wean themselves off these fuels, which could have short- and long-term impacts on emissions and food production. Feature: [What the war in Ukraine means for energy, climate and food] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00969-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Editorial: [The EU can simultaneously end dependence on Russia and meet climate goals] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00920-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Editorial: [The war in Ukraine is exposing gaps in the world’s food-systems research] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00994-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 19:58 A new measurement of a particle’s mass hints at new physics ----------------------------------------------------------------- Last week, a new estimate of the W boson’s mass caused much excitement among physicists. The result suggests that this particle is heavier than theory predicts, a finding that could be the first major breach in the standard model of particle physics. However, measuring W bosons is notoriously tricky, and further work will be needed to confirm the finding. News: [Particle’s surprise mass threatens to upend the standard model] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-01014-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

13 Apr 2022

27 MINS

27:59

13 Apr 2022


#558

Five years in the coldest fridge in the known Universe

00:46 The very cool experiment looking for a proposed particle -------------------------------------------------------------- Physics tells us that when matter is created, antimatter should be as well. But while the Universe is full of matter, there’s surprisingly little antimatter to be found. To try and understand this imbalance, a team have built a detector kept just above absolute zero which they are using to look for a hypothesised, ultra-rare type of particle decay that could create matter without antimatter. Research article: [The CUORE Collaboration] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04497-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Cryogenic mastery aids bid to spot matter creation] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00836-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:43 Research Highlights ------------------------- Subsidence of coastal cities makes them more vulnerable to sea-level rise, and tackling ‘crazy ants’ with a parasitic fungus. Research Highlight: [Global cities are sinking — and humans are partly to blame] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00911-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Marauding crazy ants come to grief when a fungus comes to call] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00888-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 12:17 Solving the puzzle of the missing plasmids ------------------------------------------------ Bacteria are well known for their ability to share genes, which they often do using small circles of DNA called plasmids. But while plasmids are common in bacteria, a long-standing mystery has been why they are absent in a group of cholera-causing strains of Vibrio cholerae. Now, a team might have solved this mystery, by discovering two previously unknown DNA defence systems that eliminate plasmids, hidden in the bacteria's genomes. Research article: [Jaskólska et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04546-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Bacterial defence systems degrade plasmid invaders] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-d41586-022-00871-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 18:41 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, what smelling jars from an Egyptian tomb has revealed about ancient burial practices, and the latest report from the IPCC. Science: [Ancient smells reveal secrets of Egyptian tomb] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00903-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature: [IPCC’s starkest message yet: extreme steps needed to avert climate disaster] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00951-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

06 Apr 2022

25 MINS

25:51

06 Apr 2022


#557

Audio long-read: A more-inclusive genome project aims to capture all of human diversity

While current maps of the human genome provide researchers with a wealth of information, many argue that they do not adequately capture humanity’s vast diversity. Now, a team are trying to build a more complete and representative map that shows the varieties of sequence that can be found in different populations. However, given the failings of other projects, some geneticists focused on the needs of Indigenous communities are wary of the initiative. This is an audio version of our Feature: [A more-inclusive genome project aims to capture all of human diversity] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00726-y) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

05 Apr 2022

18 MINS

18:40

05 Apr 2022


#556

Winding roads could make you a better navigator

00:47 Your ability to find your way may depend on where you grew up ------------------------------------------------------------------- Researchers have long been trying to understand why some humans are better at navigating than others. This week, researchers show that where someone grew up plays an important role in their ability to find their way; the more winding and disorganised the layouts of your childhood were, the better navigator you’ll be later in life. Research article: [Coutrot et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04486-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:57 Research Highlights ------------------------- How boas can squeeze without suffocating themselves, and why being far from humans helps trees live a long life. Research Highlight: [How boa constrictors squeeze and breathe at the same time] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00833-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Where are Earth’s oldest trees? Far from prying eyes] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00832-x?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:39 How coastal storminess is changing ---------------------------------------- Coastal flooding causes billions of dollars in damage each year. Rising sea levels are known to be a key driver, but the importance of another factor, storm surges, is less clear. Typically after accounting for increasing sea level, they’re not thought to make much of an impact. However new research suggests that this may not be the case. Research article: [Calafat et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04426-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 16:10 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, a brain implant allows a person who is completely paralysed to communicate, and penguin-like bone density suggests Spinosaurus may have hunted underwater. Science: [In a first, brain implant lets man with complete paralysis spell out thoughts: ‘I love my cool son.’] (https://www.science.org/content/article/first-brain-implant-lets-man-complete-paralysis-spell-out-thoughts-i-love-my-cool-son?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) National Geographic: [Spinosaurus had penguin-like bones, a sign of hunting underwater] (https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/spinosaurus-had-penguin-like-bones-a-sign-of-hunting-underwater?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Video: [A swimming dinosaur: The tail of Spinosaurus] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDhofM81RQE) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

30 Mar 2022

27 MINS

27:37

30 Mar 2022


#555

Milky Way's origin story revealed by 250,000 stars

In this episode: 00:45 Accurately ageing stars reveals the Milky Way’s history ------------------------------------------------------------- To understand when, and how, the Milky Way formed, researchers need to know when its stars were born. This week, a team of astronomers have precisely aged nearly a quarter of a million stars, revealing more about the sequence of events that took place as our galaxy formed. Research article: [Xiang and Rix] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04496-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [A stellar clock reveals the assembly history of the Milky Way] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00768-2?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:53 Research Highlights ------------------------- Archaeologists reveal an ancient lake was actually a ritual pool, and how the Moon’s phase affects some birds' altitude. Research Highlight: [Ancient ‘harbour’ revealed to be part of fertility god’s lavish shrine] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00737-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [These birds fly high when the full Moon hangs in the sky] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00738-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 12:34 Uncovering Yellowstone’s hot water plumbing ------------------------------------------------- Yellowstone National Park’s iconic geothermal geysers and volcanic landmarks are well studied, but very little was known about the ‘plumbing system’ that feeds these features. Now a team of researchers have mapped the underground hydrothermal system, showing the specific faults and pathways that supply the park. Research article: [Finn et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-04379-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 19:27 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, 0why an Australian university has been suspended from winning a research foundation’s fellowships, and the ongoing debate about the cause of ‘COVID toes’. Nature: [Funder bars university from grant programme over white-male award line-up] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00751-x?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature: [Are ‘COVID toes’ actually caused by the coronavirus?] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00707-1?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

23 Mar 2022

28 MINS

28:44

23 Mar 2022


#554

Coronapod: How vaccine complacency is plaguing 'COVID zero' strategies

A handful of states around the world have pursued 'COVID zero' strategies. Through a combination of intensive lockdowns, travel restrictions and comprehensive test and trace systems, regions like Tonga, New Zealand, Taiwan, mainland China and Western Australia managed to keep the virus at bay. But now many of these countries are facing new outbreaks on a scale they have not yet seen, and it is being driven in part by vaccine hesitancy. In this episode ofCoronapodwe discuss how a successful public health campaign can breed new problems when it comes to public perception of risk, and ask how vaccine complacency might be avoided in the future. News: [‘COVID zero’ regions struggle with vaccine complacency] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00554-0/) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

18 Mar 2022

13 MINS

13:50

18 Mar 2022


#553

The coin toss of Alzheimer's inheritance

Marty Reiswig is fit and healthy, but every two weeks he is injected with the experimental drug gantenerumab and has monthly MRI scans. He submits to this because a rare genetic mutation runs in his family that predisposes them to early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. We spoke to him about his experience on the trial, and why he chose to continue trialling the drug even after formal clinical trials were discontinued. Produced and narrated by Lorna Stewart. More on this story: News Feature: [Could drugs prevent Alzheimer’s? These trials aim to find out] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00651-0) Resources for those affected by Alzheimer's: [Alzheimer's association] (https://www.alz.org/help-support/resources) [Alzheimers.gov] (https://www.alzheimers.gov/) [Alzheimer's society] (https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

17 Mar 2022

15 MINS

15:23

17 Mar 2022


#552

The vest that can hear your heartbeat

00:45 A flexible, wearable, fabric microphone --------------------------------------------- Inspired by the ear, a team of researchers have developed an acoustic fibre that can be woven into fabrics to create a sensitive microphone. This fabric microphone is capable of detecting human speech and heartbeats, and the team think it could be used to develop new, wearable sensors for long-term health monitoring. Research article: [Yan et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04476-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [A smart sensor that can be woven into everyday life] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00691-6?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:38 Research Highlights ------------------------- How a shark’s posture lets you know if it’s asleep, and the desert dust that helps cirrus clouds form. Research Highlight: [The secrets of shark sleep] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00645-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Wispy clouds are born of dust in the wind] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00587-5?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:31 How AI helped Togo target financial aid --------------------------------------------- Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, the government of Togo needed to distribute financial aid to citizens most in need of assistance. As running a nationwide survey to find out people’s financial situations was impossible, they turned to machine learning to discover how best to distribute aid. Research article: [Aiken et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04484-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 19:02 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. Using machine learning to find meteorite fragments in a desert, and using radiocarbon dating to detect forged paintings. Physics World: [‘Huge leap’ as scientists report first drone-assisted space rock recovery after observed meteorite fall] (https://physicsworld.com/a/huge-leap-as-scientists-report-first-drone-assisted-space-rock-recovery-after-observed-meteorite-fall/?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature: [Police rely on radiocarbon dating to identify forged paintings] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00582-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

16 Mar 2022

27 MINS

27:17

16 Mar 2022


#551

The AI that deciphers ancient Greek graffiti

00:46 The AI helping historians read ancient texts -------------------------------------------------- Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence that can restore and date ancient Greek inscriptions. They hope that it will help historians by speeding up the process of reconstructing damaged texts. Research article: [Assael et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04448-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [AI minds the gap and fills in missing Greek inscriptions] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00641-2?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Video: [The AI historian: A new tool to decipher ancient texts] (https://youtu.be/rq0Ex_qCKeQ?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Ithaca platform] (http://Ithaca.deepmind.com?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:53 Research Highlights ------------------------- Pollinators prefer nectar with a pinch of salt, and measurements of a megacomet’s mighty size. Research Highlight: [Even six-legged diners can’t resist sweet-and-salty snacks] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00591-9?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Huge comet is biggest of its kind] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00588-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:10 Rewilding Argentina ------------------------- This week Nature publishes a Comment article from a group who aim to reverse biodiversity loss by reintroducing species to areas where they are extinct. We speak to one of the Comment’s authors about the project and their hopes that it might kick start ecosystem restoration. Comment: [Rewilding Argentina: lessons for the 2030 biodiversity targets] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00631-4?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 21:02 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, giant bacteria that can be seen with the naked eye, and how record-breaking rainfall has caused major floods in Australia. Science: [Largest bacterium ever discovered has an unexpectedly complex cell] (https://www.science.org/content/article/largest-bacterium-ever-discovered-has-unexpectedly-complex-cells?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) New Scientist: [Record flooding in Australia driven by La Niña and climate change] (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2309783-record-flooding-in-australia-driven-by-la-nina-and-climate-change/) The Conversation: [The east coast rain seems endless. Where on Earth is all the water coming from?] (https://theconversation.com/the-east-coast-rain-seems-endless-where-on-earth-is-all-the-water-coming-from-178316) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

09 Mar 2022

27 MINS

27:51

09 Mar 2022


#550

Coronapod: why stopping COVID testing would be a mistake

As many countries start to ease or even remove COVID restrictions entirely, there are growing concerns from researchers that this will lead governments to take their eye off the ball and crucially stop collecting and reporting vital data. In this episode ofCoronapodwe discuss calls from two researchers to improve COVID testing and data reporting. What do they want done differently? Why does it matter? And what could such changes mean for the future of the pandemic and public health more broadly? World View: [Tracking COVID-19 infections: time for change] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00336-8) World View: [Commit to transparent COVID data until the WHO declares the pandemic is over] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00424-9) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

04 Mar 2022

16 MINS

16:50

04 Mar 2022


#549

COVID stimulus spending failed to deliver on climate promises

00:47 G20 nations fail to cut emissions in COVID stimulus packages ------------------------------------------------------------------ The G20 economies spent $14 trillion dollars on recovery packages to escape the global recession driven by the COVID-19 pandemic. Many governments made pledges to deliver emissions reductions as part of these packages. This week, a team of researchers have analysed the spending to see if these promises were kept. Comment: [G20’s US$14-trillion economic stimulus reneges on emissions pledges] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00540-6?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 09:34 Research Highlights ------------------------- An artificial nerve cell triggers a Venus flytrap’s snap, and a fossil shows that pterosaurs in the Jurassic period were larger than previously thought. Research Highlight: [Venus flytrap snaps shut at synthetic neuron’s command] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00491-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [The surprisingly huge reptile that prowled the Jurassic skies] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00506-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 12:10 How knowing a little about someone changes how anonymous you feel ----------------------------------------------------------------------- This week, a team of researchers have used lab-based studies to show how learning a little about a stranger makes a person feel that the stranger knows something about them. The team took this work out of the lab and into New York City, where they showed that providing residents with knowledge about community police officers temporarily reduced crime. Research article: [Shah & LaForest] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04452-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) News and Views: [Letters and cards telling people about local police reduce crime] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00152-0?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 23:18 The experiences of Ukrainian researchers following the Russian invasion ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Following Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine on 24 February, we hear about the experiences of Ukranian researchers as the conflict continues, and the outpouring of condemnation from the wider academic world. News: [Global research community condemns Russian invasion of Ukraine] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00601-w?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

02 Mar 2022

30 MINS

30:26

02 Mar 2022


#548

Audio long-read: The race to save the Internet from quantum hackers

Almost everything we do on the Internet is made possible by cryptographic algorithms, which scramble our data to protect our privacy. However, this privacy could be under threat. If quantum computers reach their potential these machines could crack current encryption systems — leaving our online data vulnerable. To limit the damage of this so called 'Q-day', researchers are racing to develop new cryptographic systems, capable of withstanding a quantum attack. This is an audio version of our feature: [The race to save the Internet from quantum hackers] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00339-5) Never miss an episode: Subscribe to the Nature Podcast on [Apple Podcasts] (https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/nature-podcast/id81934659) , [Google Podcasts] (https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cDovL3d3dy5uYXR1cmUuY29tL25hdHVyZS9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcy9uYXR1cmUueG1s) , [Spotify] (https://open.spotify.com/show/2MydwKJpiKwiNRdxIzvFIt) or your favourite podcast app. Head [here] (http://rss.acast.com/nature) for the Nature Podcast RSS feed See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

28 Feb 2022

23 MINS

23:21

28 Feb 2022


#547

Dinosaur-destroying asteroid struck in spring

00:47 Pinpointing the season when an asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs --------------------------------------------------------------------- Around 66 million years ago, an enormous asteroid struck the Earth, leading to the end of the time of the dinosaurs. In a new paper, a team of scientists looked at evidence from fossilised fish, and suggest it happened in springtime in the Northern Hemisphere. Research article: [During et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04446-1) 08:42 Research Highlights ------------------------- Transparency shrinks the gender pay-gap in academia, and how Tutankhamen’s meteorite-metal dagger was forged. Research Highlight: [Gender pay gap closes after salary information goes public] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00434-7) Research Highlight: [How a space rock became King Tut’s dagger] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00436-5) 11:01 How climate change is affecting nighttime wildfires --------------------------------------------------------- Cool, damp nights are a critical barrier to fire progression around the world. But a recent study has revealed that the duration and intensity of nighttime fires has increased in many places, as a result of climate change. The researchers say this trend is likely to continue, hampering efforts to control blazes. Research article: [Balch et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-04325-1) 18:56 Briefing Chat ------------------- We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, how transgenic, fluorescent fish found their way into Brazil’s watercourses, and the ecological impact of a giant oil spill in Peru. Science: [Transgenic glowing fish invades Brazilian streams] (https://www.science.org/content/article/transgenic-glowing-fish-invades-brazilian-streams) Nature News: [Unprecedented oil spill catches researchers in Peru off guard] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00333-x) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

23 Feb 2022

24 MINS

24:42

23 Feb 2022


#546

Tongan volcano eruption leaves scientists with unanswered questions

Scientists scramble to understand the devastating Tongan volcano eruption, and modelling how societal changes might alter carbon emissions. In this episode: 00:46 Understanding the Tongan eruption On the 15th of January, a volcano in the South Pacific Ocean erupted, sending ash into the upper atmosphere, and unleashing a devastating tsunami that destroyed homes on Tonga’s nearby islands. Now scientists are trying to work out exactly what happened during the eruption — and what it means for future volcanic risks. News Feature: [Why the Tongan eruption will go down in the history of volcanology] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00394-y?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 08:49 Research Highlights The genes associated with reindeers’ roaming behaviour, and how fossilised puke has thrown up new insights into pterosaurs’ stomachs. Research Highlight: [A reindeer’s yearning to travel can be read in its genes] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00357-3?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Research Highlight: [Petrified puke shows that ancient winged reptiles purged] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00361-7?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 11:29 Modelling societal changes to carbon emissions A team of researchers have modelled what humans might do in the face of climate change, and looked at how societal, political and technological changes could alter future emissions. Research article: [Moore et al.] (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04423-8?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) 18:12 Briefing Chat We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, China alters its guidelines for gene-edited crops, and how Guinea worm infections have been driven down from millions of cases a year to just 14. Nature News: [China’s approval of gene-edited crops energizes researchers] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00395-x?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) Nature News: [Just 14 cases: Guinea worm disease nears eradication] (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00385-z?utm_source=naturepod&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shownotes) [Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.] (https://go.nature.com/get-the-nature-briefing) See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

16 Feb 2022

24 MINS

24:48

16 Feb 2022


#545

Coronapod: How African scientists are copying Moderna's COVID vaccine

Vaccine inequity continues to be one of the greatest challenges in the pandemic - with only 10% of those in low- and middle-income countries fully vaccinated. One of the biggest hold-ups is a lack of vaccine manufacturing capacity in poorer nations. But now, researchers at the WHO technology-transfer hub have completed the first step in a project aimed at building vaccine manufacturing capacity in the Global South, by successfully replicating Moderna's COVID vaccine without assistance from the US-based biotech company. In this episode ofCoronapod, we ask how they did it? What happens next? What the legal ramifications might be and what this could mean for the future of vaccine manufacture in low- and middle-income countries? Both during the pandemic and beyond.News:South African scientists copy Moderna's COVID vaccineNews:The fight to manufacture COVID vaccines in lower-income countriesEditorial:Africa is bringing vaccine manufacturing homeSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

11 Feb 2022

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11 Feb 2022


#544

RNA test detects deadly pregnancy disorder early

RNA in blood shows signs of pre-eclampsia before symptoms occur, and the issues of urine in our sewage and what can be done about it. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

09 Feb 2022

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09 Feb 2022


#543

Coronapod: what people get wrong about endemic COVID

The word endemic is often mistakenly used to describe a rosy end to the pandemic where COVID-19 becomes a mild, but ever-present infection akin to the common cold. But this is by no means guaranteed and the reality could be much less favourable. In this episode ofCoronapodwe get the evolutionary virologist's take - asking what endemicity might really look like, and what control we still have in shaping the future of SARS-CoV-2.World View:COVID-19: endemic doesn’t mean harmlessSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

04 Feb 2022

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04 Feb 2022


#542

Weirdly flowing water finally has an explanation: 'quantum friction'

How quantum friction explains water’s strange flows in carbon nanotubes, and the latest from the Nature Briefing. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

02 Feb 2022

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02 Feb 2022


#541

Coronapod: Why T cells have been overlooked

Much of the coverage of COVID immunity often focuses on antibody response and for good reason - these small, y-shaped proteins can detect, and in some cases neutralise, viruses like SARS-CoV-2. But as variants like Omicron evolve to evade antibodies, the role of another part of the immune system, T cells, has been brought into sharper focus. These immune cells work in a different way to antibodies, attacking infected cells rather than the virus itself, which can make their response broader and more robust. Now, research is showing that, unlike antibodies, T cell potency is not impacted by the mutations in variants like Omicron. In this episode ofCoronapod, we ask why T cells are so often overlooked, and what role they might be playing in our protection from the coronavirus.News:‘Killer’ immune cells still recognize Omicron variantSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. See <a style='color:grey;' target='_blank' rel='noopener noreferrer' href='https://acast.com/privacy'>acast.com/privacy</a> for privacy and opt-out information. ... Read more

28 Jan 2022

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28 Jan 2022