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Business Daily podcast

Business Daily

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

 

#300

Miles Copeland's life in the music business

Lessons from nearly fifty years producing and managing bands, with industry veteran Miles Copeland III. From brilliantly promoting his brother's band The Police, to founding a record label for all the misfits in the industry: the Buzzcocks, the Cramps, The Go Go's, R.E.M., The Bangles, and many more; the American-born, Lebanon-raised record executive, and now the author of the memoir 'Two Steps Forward, One Step Back', tells the BBC's Ed Butler how he built his empire with music nobody else wanted. Producer: Frey Lindsay. (Picture: Stewart Copeland, Andy Summers and Sting from The Police at the A&M offices after signing a record deal. Their manager, Miles Copeland is 3rd from left. Picture credit: Richard E. Aaron/Redferns via Getty Images.) ... Read more

29 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:29

29 Jul 2021


#299

The billionaire space race

Why Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk are battling it out among the stars. Ed Butler speaks to Brad Stone, author of the book Amazon Unbound, about Amazon founder Jeff Bezos's lifelong obsession with space, and to Christian Davenport, space reporter for the Washington Post, about the growing rivalry between the worlds two richest men over government space contracts and the future of the space economy. Former astronaut Janet Kavandi tells us why, like Elon Musk, NASA has Mars colonisation in its sights. (Photo: Jeff Bezos among Blue Origin’s New Shepard crew after flying into space on July 20, 2021. Credit: Getty Images) ... Read more

28 Jul 2021

18 MINS

18:15

28 Jul 2021


#298

The great resignation wave

Has the pandemic encouraged more of us to quit our jobs? Rebecca Kesby speaks to Anthony Klotz, associate professor at Texas A&M University, who says the US is about to face a wave of resignations, as many people re-evaluate what they want from a job after months of lockdowns. Ben Kiziltug from the HR software company Personio tells us why companies who managed their staff poorly during the pandemic risk losing workers now. But Zeynep Ton from the MIT Sloan School of Management explains why there might not be a long-lasting shift in power from employers to employees. (Photo credit: Getty Images) ... Read more

27 Jul 2021

18 MINS

18:16

27 Jul 2021


#297

Just how bad is rental fashion?

Rental fashion is in the spotlight when it comes to climate footprint. A new study suggests it might not be the silver bullet as once thought, but environmental journalist Lucy Siegle cautions the study is too limited to give a blanket judgment on the rental industry overall. Meanwhile, Christina Dean, of the charity Redress, argues that the potential for rental fashion marks a revolutionary step in the way we think about our clothing. Eshita Kabra, founder of By Rotation, the world's first social fashion rental app, says people around the world could easily solve the fashion industry’s problem with the clothes already in their wardrobe. And sustainable stylist Susie Holland argues that there is a wealth of value stored up in second-hand and recycled clothing. (Picture: Clothes hanging in the wardrobe. Picture credit: Getty Image.) ... Read more

26 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:28

26 Jul 2021


#296

Business Weekly

In this episode of Business Weekly, we look at the use of vaccine passports in the tourism and hospitality industries. Owning a 'pass sanitaire' is now compulsory to visit certain sites in France and nightclubs in the UK have been told they can only admit people who’ve been double-jabbed come September. We also have a special report on the Champlain Tower in Miami, where nearly a hundred people died last month when the building collapsed. What lessons should be learned? And Jeff Bezos blasted into space this week, hot on the heels of fellow billionaire supersonic joyrider Richard Branson. We’ll ask why. Business Weekly is produced by Matthew Davies and presented by Lucy Burton. ... Read more

24 Jul 2021

50 MINS

50:15

24 Jul 2021


#295

Will the Tokyo Olympics pay off?

Japanese businesses are struggling with the lack of tourists during the Tokyo Olympics. Despite delaying the games by a year, the authorities have still been forced to hold the games without spectators, as Covid cases rise. Seijiro Takeshita at the University of Shizuoka explains why the Japanese were hoping for a successful Olympics, and why it’s now become so controversial. Also in the programme, we’ll hear from a number of businesses affected by the lack of tourists. And Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus at Hitotsubashi University, describes how big sponsors have resisted pressure from the Tokyo government not to withdraw support for the games. (Picture: The logo for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Picture credit: Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images) ... Read more

23 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:27

23 Jul 2021


#294

The future of the Afghan economy

What will the US withdrawal from Afghanistan mean for the economy? The relative security provided by US forces and others over the past 20 years not only helped many grow successful family enterprises but also attracted foreign investors and larger business ventures. Rebecca Kesby speaks to Saad Mohseni, Chief Executive of MOBI, a media company that launched the first private radio station playing pop music in Afghanistan, which had been banned under the Taliban. What does he make of the sudden withdrawal of American troops? Among those with the most to fear are businesswomen. Under the US influence women and girls enjoyed greater freedom, access to education and many built successful companies of their own including Ayeda Shadab who has her own fashion brand. In the past few weeks she has received several death threats just for running her own business. And Iskander Akylbayev, Executive Director of the Kazakhstan Council on International Relations, tells Rebecca that increased instability in Afghanistan may affect the whole regional dynamic. Photo: A vendor displays a traditional outfit at a shop in Koch-e Morgha street in Kabul on June 15, 2021. Credit: Getty Images) ... Read more

22 Jul 2021

18 MINS

18:19

22 Jul 2021


#293

The long shadow of Covid on kids' education

The pandemic has left an indelible mark on the education of children around the world. Today on Business Daily, the BBC's Nisha Patel speaks with young people in the UK and India about how their futures have been affected by missing education. We'll also hear from Maya Sukumaran, Principal of Gitanjali Senior School in Hyderabad, India, for her thoughts on how online learning is changing students' relationships and behaviour. And Hans Sievertsen, an economist at the University of Bristol, lays out some of the expected impacts to the economy of all this lost learning. (Picture credit: Getty Creative.) ... Read more

21 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:26

21 Jul 2021


#292

Vatican reforms see a cardinal on trial

Ten people, including an Italian cardinal, will face a Vatican trial for alleged financial crimes. Cardinal Angelo Becciu has become the highest-ranked cleric in the Vatican to be indicted over charges that include embezzlement and abuse of office. The charges relate to a multi-million-dollar property purchase with church funds in London. Ines San Martin, Rome reporter for Crux, outlines the charges and what we know about the trial so far. This will mark the first time such a high-ranking Vatican official will face trial over financial crimes, but Gerald Posner, an investigative journalist and author of God's Bankers: A History of Money and Power at the Vatican, explains financial scandals themselves are nothing new for the Vatican Bank. And Massimo Faggioli, Vatican historian and Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at Villanova University, explains how this trial sits among Pope Francis' larger efforts for reform. (Picture: Cardinal Giovanni Angelo Becciu and Pope Francis. Picture credit: Reuters.) ... Read more

20 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:27

20 Jul 2021


#291

Chefs call time on abusive practices

Is it time the old trope of the brilliant, angry chef gets retired for good? Michelin-starred chefs are often famous for their skill, precision and passion. But many of them are just as well-known for their tyrannical and belligerent behaviour towards staff. With ever more allegations surfacing of abuse and harassment in Michelin-starred restaurants, leaders in the industry are calling for the culture to change once and for all. Eric Rivera, owner and head chef at Addo in Seattle tells the BBC’s Tamasin Ford about the abuse he’s seen and experienced first-hand, and why he thinks it’s always white male chefs who get praised for this behaviour. Asma Khan, chef and owner of Darjeeling Express in London, says chefs should be stripped of their accolades if found to be abusive. Chef and TikTok star Poppy O’Toole says she’s worried that without positive change, an industry ravaged by Covid-19 might never fully recover. And Viviana Varese, chef and owner of Viva in Milan, tells Tamasin how she built an inclusive and supportive environment for her staff, while still achieving Michelin-star excellence. Producer: Frey Lindsay (Photo: Chef holding a pan in flames. Credit: Getty Images) ... Read more

19 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:27

19 Jul 2021


#290

Business Weekly

Global economies are starting to see the return of inflation after a long period of low prices and low interest rates. Central bankers seem pretty calm so far, but some economists are getting jittery. We’ll find out why prices are rising and what can be done to steady the global economic ship. As the EU announces dramatic plans to curb climate change we ask what more financial institutions can do to play their part. We’ll hear how the fight against HIV/AIDS has progressed in the 40 years since it was first described in a medical journal. With the Olympics just around the corner could shoes worn by some athletes be giving them an unfair advantage? We’ll be looking at so-called ‘mechanical doping’. Plus, reporting from the garden of England, our reporter looks at the company developing new varieties of strawberries. Business Weekly is produced by Clare Williamson and presented by Lucy Burton. (Image: A gas station attendant fills a car in Peshawar, Pakistan, Image Credit: European Pressphoto Agency) ... Read more

17 Jul 2021

49 MINS

49:33

17 Jul 2021


#289

Amazon's fake reviews problem

Online marketplaces are being flooded with bogus reviews. Is the whole model of ecommerce under threat? Rebecca Kesby speaks to Neena Bhati from UK consumer group Which? about the ways unscrupulous sellers are generating fake reviews to boost sales of their products, and Amazon seller Janson Smith tells us the impact fake reviews can have on legitimate small businesses that depend on Amazon for their sales. Saoud Khalifah, CEO of FakeSpot, decribes the scale of the bogus reviews problem, and the threat it poses to the integrity of the ecommerce model. (Picture: Graphic of a five-star review, Credit: Getty Images) ... Read more

16 Jul 2021

18 MINS

18:15

16 Jul 2021


#288

Carlos Ghosn speaks out

Carlos Ghosn was the superstar chairman of the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi alliance, one of the largest automakers in the world. Now, he’s an exile from the Japanese authorities in his home country of Lebanon. Ghosn sat down with the BBC’s Simon Jack to discuss everything that happened between these two points: from his shock arrest in a Tokyo airport charged with financial crimes, to prolonged legal battles and his dramatic escape from Japan. (Picture: Former Renault-Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn in Beirut on January 8, 2020. Picture credit: JOSEPH EID/AFP via Getty Images) ... Read more

14 Jul 2021

18 MINS

18:14

14 Jul 2021


#287

Why gin is still fizzing

From its early reputation as mothers’ ruin to its prime spot in upscale cocktail bars, we tell the story of the juniper-infused spirit. And as the gin craze in the US and the UK shows no sign of slowing, we ask where the next global hotspots will be. Dr Angela McShane of Warwick University tells Elizabeth Hotson how and why gin drinking became popular in the UK and Sandie Van Doorne, from Lucas Bols - which claims to be the oldest distillery brand in the world - explains how the Dutch spirit, genever, fits into the story. Sean Harrison of Plymouth Gin explains how the company is taking on the new contenders in the market and we hear from up-and-coming brands; Toby Whittaker from Whittakers Gin and Temi Shogelola of Black Crowned Gin. Plus, we hear from Emily Neill, Chief Operating Officer at the IWSR which provides data and analysis on the beverage alcohol market. And a programme about gin wouldn’t be complete without a cocktail; William Campbell-Rowntree, bar supervisor at Artesian in London’s Langham Hotel, gives his tips for the perfect tipple. Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson Producer: Sarah Treanor (Picture of a gin and tonic with garnish; Picture via Getty Images) ... Read more

13 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:28

13 Jul 2021


#286

Tokyo Olympics: Battle of the super shoes

As we head towards the postponed Tokyo Olympics, the world’s eyes will be on athletics. But huge controversy is brewing over a new type of super shoe which has led to a recent surge in track and field records. Ivana Davidovic asks whether runners' ability is becoming less and less important for success on the track? And what does that do the sport? US Olympian Mason Ferlic is worried that this is creating a division between the haves and the have nots and thinks that World Athletics should pander less to big brands and tighten regulation on running shoes. Canadian Olympian Madeleine Kelly talks about the unprecedented situation when rival brands allowed their sponsored athletes to run in Nike's super spikes, which are widely regarded as ahead of the pack at the moment. But they are not the only ones. Technology used to assist disabled athletes is now propelling their able-bodied counterparts to new heights. Running coach and former World Athletics official Peter Thompson - who also worked in shoe development for Nike and Hoka - says we are nowhere near the limit to where materials can go. He also sees these super shoes as "mechanical doping." While professor of sports innovation Mike Caine warns that to limit innovation would be a commercial disaster for any sport, as viewers and sponsors are attracted by tumbling records. (Photo: Male sprinter starts from blocks in athletics stadium. Credit: Getty Images) ... Read more

12 Jul 2021

18 MINS

18:13

12 Jul 2021


#285

Business Weekly

Authorities in China ordered Didi to stop taking new ride sharing customers, and banned the sale of the app, because of data sharing issues. Investors in the newly floated company are furious, but this isn’t the first kind of regulatory intervention China has made. So what’s behind this crackdown? As numerous sporting events take place this weekend we’ll be looking at the political power wielded by sports stars and what that means for the brands that sponsor them. We’ll head to a geo-thermal plant in Cornwall, UK, to find out whether the industry could provide secure, reliable renewable energy in a de-carbonised world. Plus, we’ll hear from the woman trying to make amends for her family’s part in slavery. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Clare Williamson. (Image: A vehicle of China's ride-hailing platform Didi Chuxing, Credit: Getty Images) ... Read more

10 Jul 2021

49 MINS

49:24

10 Jul 2021


#284

Climate change: the financial fight

When it comes to climate change, what is the world of finance doing? Manuela Saragosa speaks to Jan Erik Saugestad, executive vice president of Norwegian asset managers Storebrand, whose investments must meet certain environmental, social and governance standards. This week also saw finance ministers from the V20 group of countries most vulnerable to climate change meet virtually. We talk climate justice with former president of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, currently speaker of the country's parliament. Produced by Benjie Guy. (Picture: coins in a jar with plant on a table. Credit Getty Images.) ... Read more

09 Jul 2021

18 MINS

18:11

09 Jul 2021


#283

Bustling or bust: How is the City of London coping after Brexit?

It’s been six months since the UK’s transition period from the EU ended. While the two sides hammered out arrangements for how various goods-producing sectors would continue to trade post-Brexit, financial services was largely left out of negotiations. We hear from the boss of Euronext, the head of securities trading at the London Stock Exchange, the man who authored a government-commissioned report on reforming the city’s listings regime, and a host of others to find out whether Brexit has been good or bad for the industry. Presented by: Victoria Criag Produced by: Stephen Ryan, Nisha Patel, Jonathan Frewin ... Read more

08 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:26

08 Jul 2021


#282

The tyranny of merit

Can anyone make it in the modern western world with hard work and good education? No, says Harvard philosopher Michael Sandel in conversation with Ed Butler. He says liberal politicians have lied to us, which is why populist politics has taken root. So what's the solution to the failure of globalisation? (Picture: Michael Sandel addresses a theatre audience. Credit: http://justiceharvard.org) ... Read more

07 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:28

07 Jul 2021


#281

Player power

Footballers and other athletes are standing up to the sponsors who subsidise them. Ed Butler speaks to Laurence Halsted, a former British Olympic Fencer who wrote about his concerns about the Games in Rio de Janeiro, in 2016. Sports marketing consultant Tim Crow says the involvement of people's politics in sport makes the usual bonanza for sponsors at events a lot more problematic. Martyn Ziegler, chief sports reporter at The Times, thinks the Olympics may find itself under growing pressure as players blur the messages that brands and governments are hoping to promote. Produced by Benjie Guy. (Picture: Portuguese footballer Cristiano Ronaldo at a Euro 2020 press conference. Credit: Getty Images.) ... Read more

06 Jul 2021

17 MINS

17:28

06 Jul 2021